Video Streaming Options at Emory

Looking for ways to stream videos this fall?

Current Emory students, faculty, and staff have access to a wide variety of streaming video resources, from documentaries to music to popular studio films. While not a comprehensive list, these are some of Emory’s most popular streaming services:

Academic Video Online (AVON): Best for documentaries in history, art, and other humanities.

Kanopy: Mixture of Hollywood blockbusters, global cinema, and popular documentaries. Some highlights include a number of films in the Criterion Collection and selections from The Great Courses.

Swank: While primarily used for Course Reserves, Swank has a selection of Hollywood films, and even some recent releases!

Film Platform: Modern documentaries with a social justice and politics emphasis.

Some quick tips and tricks:

  • If you’re having trouble streaming, try opening the page in an incognito or private browser window.

  • Not all films on these sites show up in discoverE, so take a look on each site individually to confirm their available titles.

  • Selections change frequently, so be sure to check back for new titles!

  • Contact reference librarians for more help searching and discovering streaming resources at Emory.

In addition, check out LITS Films and Videos page for more information!

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Summer Reading, Vol.12: Roger Sangburm Nam

As the summer intercession comes to a close, Pitts wraps up its Summer Reading Recommendation blog series by consulting a brand new face to the Emory and Candler faculty! Roger S. Nam will join us this fall as professor of Hebrew Bible. Dr. Nam formally served as dean and professor of biblical studies at Portland Seminary at George Fox University in Oregon. A financial analyst before turning his attention to biblical studies, Nam focuses his research on the economies of the ancient Near East and the book of Ezra-Nehemiah, applying traditional historical-critical methods within social-scientific frameworks. He has also served as a pastor in Seoul, Korea. 

While Dr. Nam notes that fiction isn’t typically on his reading list, he admits that his friends’ ravings about Pachinko by novelist Min Jin Lee were warranted. This New York Times Bestseller set in the early 1900s follows the story of teenaged Sunja, the daughter of a crippled fisherman, whose decision to abandon her home and to reject her son’s powerful father sets off a dramatic saga that echos down through the generations. Readers can find this profound story of love, sacrifice, ambition, and loyalty at Emory libraries or at local public libraries.

If you’d rather set down your book and pick up the remote, Dr. Nam recommends the Hulu series Taste the Nation with Padma Lakshmi. Take a journey across America with this award winning cookbook author, host and executive producer to explore the rich and diverse food culture of various immigrant groups. From indigenous communities to recent immigrant arrivals, Padma uncovers the roots and relationship between one’s food, one’s humanity and one’s history. Stream this show on Hulu to find out exactly how “a (wheat flour) burrito is tradition wrapped in colonization.”

For those long drives or flights, Dr. Nam suggests one of his favorite Freakonomics podcasts, No Stupid Questions with Stephen Dubner and Angela Duckworth. During each episode, Dubner as a journalist and writer and Duckworth as an academic and researcher ask each other questions leading to lively conversations on research, literature, philosophy, and history. Whether you’re inquiring if charisma can be taught, or if familiarity really breeds contempt, you’re in for a wild but intelligent ride. Looking to the future, Dr. Nam “holds hope that hallway conversations at Candler will be this much fun and productive.” Listeners can subscribe to the series on Apple PodcastsStitcherGoogle PodcastsSpotify, or use the R.S.S. feed.

Thanks for joining us on this exciting ride through recommendations in literature, non-fiction, podcasts, documentaries, and more! Remember that these posts remain available on the Pitts Librarians’ Blog to revisit whenever you’re searching for something new to add to the shelf. We’d like to thank each and every one of our contributors for sharing their suggestions and finds, and we look forward to hearing from more library and Candler faculty and staff next summer! 

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Summer Reading, Vol.11: Khalia Williams

For reading recommendations this week, we consulted Assistant Dean of Worship and Music, Assistant Professor in the Practice of Worship, and Co-Director of the Baptist Studies Program, Khalia J. Williams! An ordained minister, Khalia serves as an associate minister and First Lady at the historic Providence Missionary Baptist church in Atlanta. With a deep passion for the intersection of worship, womanist theology and embodiment, she is a lead consultant for multiple denominations in the area of liturgical transformation.

Khalia’s first reading recommendation is no surprise in consideration of her pivotal role as a leader the church and higher education. She share’s Shelly Hart’s (Director of Academic Administration and Registrar) endorsement of Another Way: Living and Leading Change on Purpose written by leaders of the Forum for Theological Exploration, Stephen Lewis, Matthew Wesley Williams, and Dori Baker. This book offers practices to facilitate change through a holistic approach to leadership. The authors propose a 21st century model that honors the self, the community, and even the stranger as we work together for purposeful change in the midst of turbulent times. Find a copy of this book online in both paperback and ebook formats!

If you’d prefer a fictional saga, Khalia recommends Marion Zimmer Bradley’s The Mists of Avalon. This book follows the tumult and adventures of Camelot’s court through the eyes of the women who bolstered the king’s rise and schemed for his fall. This the great Arthurian epic filled with a diverse cast of characters will keep you hooked as Christianity takes over the island-nation of Britain. Find this book online or on the shelves at Emory or at your local public library!

Khalia’s last pick is the acclaimed post-apocalyptic novel from award-winning author Octavia Butler, Parable of the sower. Set in a time of global climate change and economic crises that led to social chaos in the early 2020s, this story follows fifteen-year-old Lauren Olamina who lives inside a gated community with her preacher father, family, and neighbors, sheltered from the surrounding anarchy. This powerful fight for survival in any environment full of dangers leads to the birth of a new faith and a startling vision of human destiny. This book is available at Emory Libraries, your local public library, or online for purchase.

Next week we will wrap up our summer reading series with recommendations from Candler’s incoming Professor of Hebrew Bible, Roger S. Nam! Catch up on the whole series on the Pitts Librarians blog.

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Summer Reading, vol. 10: Bo Adams

This week we explored the shelves of someone who is no stranger to Candler School of Theology, the Graduate Division of Religion, or Emory Libraries, Director of Pitts Theology Library and Margaret A. Pitts Assistant Professor in the Practice of Theological Bibliography Richard (Bo) Manly Adams, Jr.! Trained as a New Testament scholar, a software developer, and a librarian, Bo Adams has guided Pitts Theology Library as it moves into an increasingly digital future through remote learning and research, collection access, and virtual outreach. Bo’s recommendations for summer reading and listening are ancillary with his talents, interests, and vision for the library.

If you fancy fiction, Bo recommends Neal Stephenson’s latest novel Fall, or, Dodge in Hell (William Morrow, 2019). Stephenson, a prolific author of science fiction and technology thriller, explores what it means to be and stay alive through a story of a man who dies but is kept “alive” through the attempt to scan and upload the contents of his brain. Stephenson’s fast-paced story, which draws upon fields as diverse as transhumanism, religion, history, and sociology, invites readers to consider the connection of our minds to our bodies, the notion of the human as a social being, and our responsibility and control over the created world we inhabit. Be prepared, however, as Bo warns “this book is long!” Find it on the shelves at Emory, at your local public library, or online for purchase

If you’re looking to listen on a long road trip or flight, Bo suggests of of his favorite podcasts, the NPR series “Tiny Desk Concerts.” This collection of intimate concerts is recorded in the office of All Things Considered host Bob Boilen. Bo has listened often to the concert of John Prine, who recently died due to COVID-19 complications. This 4-song concert was recorded in March 2018, and shows the genius and humor of Prine, one of America’s great songwriters and story tellers. NPR also just released a tribute to Prine, with performances by Margo Price, Jeremy Ivey, Courtney Marie Andrews, John Paul White, Nathaniel Ratcliff, and Brandy Clark, all performing Prine classics.

As we move into the final weeks of the summer intercession, find even more summer resource suggestions from Candler and Pitts faculty and staff, including podcasts, films, and more, on the Pitts Librarians’ Blog!

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Pitts Scholars Projects: Religion & Psychology Research Guide by Shelby Hal

Pitts continues to highlight projects completed by the 2019–20 Pitts Scholars cohort in the areas of research, pedagogy, and community engagement. The Pitts Library Scholar program offers exceptional doctoral and masters students the opportunity to participate in the discussions that guide the future of the library, and this year marked the third iteration of the program since its launch in 2016.

This week we highlight rising third year MDiv Shelby Hall’s project, a LibGuide on Religion and Psychology to assist Emory students in Candler courses and the broader community in interdisciplinary research. The online research guide includes essential publications in psychology and religion. It also includes centers of research at Emory dedicated to the study of this intersection and related fields.

A big thanks and congratulations to Shelby on a project well done! Stay tuned for more Pitts Scholars Projects highlights from the 2019–20 cohort.

 

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Summer Reading, vol. 9: Abigail Chewning

If you’re a student employee at Candler School of Theology, you’ll probably recognize this week’s contributor to the summer reading recommendation series! Abigail Chewning not only coordinates student employment at Candler, but also performs admissions data analysis and CRM system management among other duties. Abigail gives us a great mix of suggestions that that appeal a variety of interests.

Abigail’s first recommendation is “a quick and easy read that will honestly make you laugh and cry with every page turn.” Born a Crime by South African comedian, political commentator, and television host Trevor Noah is a New York Times bestseller. This collection of stories follows Noah’s unlikely path from apartheid South Africa to the desk of The Daily Show that began with a criminal act: his birth. Emory users can access this audiobook through Overdrive or purchase in another format online

Another book Abigail “couldn’t put down” this summer is Susannah Cahalan’s Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness. Also a New York Times bestseller, this book reads like a nonfiction thriller and is written by the victim of a rare and terrifying disease who miraculously survives. Read or listen to her harrowing story online through Emory or through your local public library.

Abigail’s third suggestion, A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America by Ronald Takaki, was “hailed by critics and academics everywhere as a dramatic new retelling of our nation’s past.” This book engages the voice of non-Anglo peoples of the United States, and consequently Abigail deems it a “mandatory reading for all Americans.” Find this book on the shelves at Emory at your local library, or online for purchase.

Among all her suggestions, Abigail’s “all-time favorite book” is the acclaimed The Glass Castle: A Memoir by Jeannette Walls. Remaining on the New York Times bestseller list for over seven years, this memoir documents a fight by the children of Rex and Rose Mary Walls to carve out a successful life on their own terms. Find this book at Emory, or watch the story unfold in the 2017 major motion picture.

For those who like to laugh and learn about new and unique topics, Abigail concludes her suggestions on a lighter note with the podcast Getting Curious by Jonathan Van News. This American hairdresser, podcaster, and television personality invites the listeners to ask those questions they’ve always wondered about in a variety of fields, from political theory to amphibiology. Jonathan engages with experts weekly to explore all things under the sun, and you can too through Apple Podcasts and other audio platforms!

Stay tuned for next week’s recommendations from Director of the Library, Richard (Bo) Manly Adams, Jr! 

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Pitts Closed for Independence Day Weekend (Friday July 3–5)

Pitts Theology Library will be closed from Thursday, July 2 at 2pm through Sunday, July 5 in observance of Independence Day. The Library will resume its current operations and services on Monday, July 6. Have a safe and pleasant holiday weekend! Declaration of Independence Scroll

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Pitts Scholars Projects: ‘Ethics & Health Libguide’ by Seulbin Lee

Despite interruptions to the academic year, the 2019–20 Pitts Scholars cohort continued to explore library projects in the areas of research, pedagogy, and community engagement. The Pitts Library Scholar program offers exceptional doctoral and masters students the opportunity to participate in the discussions that guide the future of the library, and this year marked the third iteration of the program since its launch in 2016.

This week we highlight rising third year MDiv Seulbin Lee’s project, an online research guide that sketches a map of ethics and health by identifying introductory resources and germane theologians in the field. Seulbin’s libguide provides various modes of pursuing the topic including feminist/womanist ethics, Catholic social ethics, philosophical ethics, and social ethics. Recommended works discuss a variety of topics from genetic technology so global health to chaplaincy. This resource comes at a critical time when scholars must navigate theological and ethical questions arising from the current health crisis. Visit the guide online to get started, and congratulations to Seulbin and her project advisor, Brady Beard, for this remarkable work on a timely subject!

Stay tuned for more Pitts Scholars Projects highlights from the 2019–20 cohort!

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Summer Reading, vol. 8: Caitlin Russell

Who better to consult for summer reading suggestions this week than the librarian whose speciality is assessing and acquiring books, academic journals, and more for the library! Caitlin Russell, Acquisitions, Serials, and Assessment Librarian at Pitts, works hard to develop Pitts’ collections in addition to setting up access to purchased resources for Emory patrons. Caitlin’s suggestions this summer revisit her interest in Ancient Greek mythology, which she studied alongside Roman studies in her undergraduate program. The books she recommends “take new twists (and more than a few historical liberties) on familiar myths to create narratives that are both thought-provoking and highly readable.”

First, Caitlin recommends The Penelopiad by Margaret Atwood, which tells the story of Odysseus and Penelope from the perspective of Penelope’s 12 handmaids, who Odysseus hanged upon his return to Ithaca. The book is structured around a handmaids’ chorus that reflects the style of a classical Greek play, and the content provides insight into how Penelope might have handled her household during Odysseus’ absence. Find this book at Emory, your local library, or online for purchase in a variety of formats!

While Ursula K. Le Guin is best known for science fiction, Caitlin appreciates on of her publications that diverges from that genre called Lavinia. This book follows the tale of Aeneas’ wife as described by Virgil in The Aeneid, fleshing out a character that history has left as a line drawing. Using her signature storytelling talents, Le Guin refocuses on Lavinia’s life and makes the more well-known characters play a supporting role to her story. This book is available at Emory libraries, local public libraries, and for purchase online. 

Madeline Miller’s 2018 publication, Circe, received greater acclaim, but her lesser-known (although still award-winning) 2012 book Song of Achilles is another one of Caitlin’s must reads. In Song of Achilles, Miller tells the story of Patroclus, companion to the famed Achilles. The book explores themes of fate, love, and interactions between gods and mortals within a compelling narrative leading up to the Trojan War. Emory users can find this novel at the Woodruff and Oxford College libraries, local libraries, or purchase in a different format online.

Finally, Caitlin recommends a book that asks the question, “What if Theseus’ battle with the Minotaur took place in the era of the Kardashians?” The resulting novel, Lifestyles of Gods and Monsters by Emily Roberson, is an engaging re-telling of the legend in which Ariadne is a reluctant participant in the family reality show and the annual Labyrinth Contest is the biggest event on television. Visit your public library to check out this book, or buy a copy online!

Find even more summer resource suggestions, including podcasts, films, and more, on the Pitts Librarians’ Blog!

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Summer Reading, vol. 7: Shelly Hart

This week Pitts consulted a Candler staff member who specializes in educational administration, keeping the ship afloat as students enroll, access academic records, and plan their course roadmaps for a variety of programs. Shelly Hart, Director of Academic Administration and Registrar, not only engages with students through the registrar office, but also by actively highlighting edifying resources pertinent to the Candler community!

Shelly’s first recommendation is a must read for aspiring leaders, both in Candler and beyond! Another Way: Living and Leading Change on Purpose written by leaders of the Forum for Theological Exploration, Stephen Lewis, Matthew Wesley Williams, and Dori Baker offers practices to facilitate change through a holistic approach to leadership. The authors propose a 21st century model that honors the self, the community, and even the stranger as we work together for purposeful change in the midst of turbulent times. Find a copy of this book online in both paperback and ebook formats!

If you’re looking for a work of fiction, one of Shelly’s recent favorites is Lisa See’s novel The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane. This book tells the stories of two girls, a very young mother, Li-yan, from a remote village in the tea mountains of China and her estranged daughter. The story follows Li-yan’s search to reclaim her daughter after the child disappeared into the international adoption machine in China, through which she has become Halley, the daughter of a white family in California. As mother and daughter grow up in vastly disparate circumstances, they experience divergent realities while at the same time continuing to long for a reuniting. Shelly notes that this book reveals interesting cultural details about a remote part of China and explores the experiences of both parents and adoptees involved in international and intercultural adoption. Find this item in the Emory catalog, at your local library, or online for purchase

If you’re looking to listen, Shelly recommends researcher and New York Times best-selling author Brene Brown’s podcast Unlocking Us. While originally planned to launch at South x Southwest 2020, this podcast instead premiered at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown.  Brown’s discussion partners include a range of writers, thinkers, artists, and others, including Sue Monk Kidd, Ibram X. Kendi, Alicia Keys, Tarana Burke, Reese Witherspoon, Kerry Washington, and Celeste Ng. Episodes offer “conversations that unlock the deeply human part of who we are, so that we can live, love, parent, and lead with more courage and heart.” Listen to this inspirational content online for free at https://brenebrown.com/podcast/introducing-unlocking-us/.

Summer recommendations from Pitts and Candler faculty and staff don’t stop here! Find more suggestions at pitts.emory.edu/blog.

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