Dennis Liotta Receives Honorary Doctorate from the University of Ottawa

Congratulations to Dr. Dennis Liotta for receiving an honorary Doctor of Science degree from the University of Ottawa. Honorary doctorate degrees acknowledge the value of the abilities and experiences of the recipient and are awarded for significant contributions made by the recipient to the University of Ottawa, their profession, or society. Upon receiving the honorary degree, Dr. Dennis Liotta delivered a speech to the graduating class of the University.

“We can’t afford to sit and wait for others to change the world — we have to do it ourselves. The good news is that we all have the capacity to make the world a better place. All that is required is that we be proactive and persistent on an issue or cause that we’re passionate about. So, this is my challenge to all of you here today. Examine your own lives, identify a problem compatible with your skills and pursue it. If it’s something you’re passionate about and you’re willing to persevere, I guarantee you that you’ll find a way of doing it well. Remember, however, that this is marathon, not a sprint. So, don’t ever lose sight of your goals and your dreams.”

Click [here] to read the whole speech.

Congratulations, Dr. Liotta!

Huw Davies to Receive the Herbert C. Brown Award for Creative Research in Synthetic Methods

Congratulations to Dr. Huw Davies for being named the recipient of the Herbert C. Brown Award for Creative Research in Synthetic Methods given by the American Chemical Society for 2019. This award recognizes  outstanding and creative research involved in the discovery and development of novel and useful methods for chemical synthesis.

National award winners will be honored at a ceremony in conjunction with the 257th ACS National Meeting on Tuesday, April 2nd, 2019 in Orlando, Florida.

Congratulations, Dr. Davies!

2018 Atlanta Mini Symposium on Theoretical and Computational Chemistry

On Saturday, September 8th, the Emory University Department of Chemistry teamed up with Georgia Tech to host the 2018 Atlanta Mini Symposium on Theoretical and Computational Chemistry. The event, organized by Francesco Evangelista (Emory) and David Sherrill (Georgia Tech) brought together theoretical and computational chemists across metro-Atlanta for connection and collaboration. Attendees heard talks from invited speakers and spent the afternoon sharing ideas with fellow chemists in the field. The group plans to make the conference an annual event for the local theoretical chemistry community.

Tianquan (Tim) Lian Named New Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Chemical Physics

Dr. Tianquan (Tim) Lian pictured with current JCP Editor-in-Chief, Marsha Lester. Photo: @AIP_Publishing

Beginning in January 2019, Tianquan (Tim) Lian will take over the role of Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Chemical Physics, a flagship journal of the American Institute of Physics (AIP). The highly cited, peer-reviewed archival journals of AIP help to lay the foundation for the field of physics. Currently, Dr. Lian serves as Co-Editor-in-Chief of Chemical Physics and is a member of the Advisory Editorial Boards for Chemical Physics Letters and Spectrochimica Acta A.

Congratulations, Dr. Lian!

Alumni Spotlight: Dr. Anne Gorden, a Scholar in Translation

“It was kind of like there were two of me! On Monday, Wednesday, Friday I was doing chemistry and laboratories, and on Tuesday and Thursdays I studied the classics.” says Dr. Anne Gorden (EC’ 96) about her undergraduate experience at Emory. Her desire to study chemistry dated back to high school. Learning that her AP credits left her with space in her schedule opened up the opportunity to choose another field, too. So, between chemistry lectures and labs, (including undergraduate research with Emeritus Professor Al Padwa), Anne began taking classes in English, literature, classics, and Spanish. By the time she graduated, she had earned enough credits to double major in Chemistry and Literature.

Early in her academic career, Anne recognized the value of merging the fields of science and language. As an undergraduate, she had the unique chance to TA for a Quantitative Analysis course. She found that she needed to be creative and deliberate with her choice of words to effectively teach complex scientific concepts to a diverse student population. “You have to think about your audience when you’re putting together a presentation as a way to make it more approachable,” says Anne. Her ability to translate dense scientific topics into a language that everyone could understand mirrored her work in comparative literature, a field that explores culture, theory, and history across literary, disciplinary, and linguistic boundaries.

Anne opted to continue her education at the University of Texas at Austin, where she earned her PhD in Organic Chemistry working with Prof. Jonathan Sessler. Her graduate research focused on developing organic compounds for selective detection of actinides. Although the research laboratory  was based in Austin, Anne spent about half of her graduate career traveling to Los Alamos National Laboratory to test her compounds. Once again, Anne was a scholar in translation, bridging her chemical interests in organic chemistry to an in actinide and lanthanide chemistry, ultimately steering her towards a postdoctoral appointment with the same theme at the University of California in Berkeley with Prof. Kenneth Raymond.

Now, as an Associate Professor in Chemistry and Biochemistry at Auburn University, Professor Gorden is making great use of all aspects of her education. Research faculty spend a lot of time writing. Grants, manuscripts, course curriculum, reference letters… the list goes on. Fortunately for Dr. Gorden, her literature degree helped prepare her for the writing that accompanies her current position.

Before being hired, however, Professor Gorden remembers recognizing that she bridges the fields between organic and inorganic chemistry. The seemingly opposite fields can seem as unrelated as… well… chemistry and literature. Instead of viewing her situation as being split between two fields, she began to view it as an opportunity, as she had done back in undergraduate days at Emory. The two independent chemistry disciplines inform each other, making each more dynamic and well-rounded, just as her training in chemistry and literature do.

As a mentor, Professor Gorden aims to help her students reach their goals by presenting as many opportunities as possible. She serves as an advisor for the Association of Women in Science at Auburn University and helps to provide undergraduate women with a platform for support and networking. For Anne, the most important thing for graduate students is to be guided by passion and scientific creativity. “You have to find the spot that you fit in,” she says, “where there is a project that really inspires you, and where you are going to get the skills, the tools you need for your career.”

Twitter: @anniegorden

Congratulations, Dr. Lara Patel!

On Monday, July 16th, Lara Patel successfully defended her thesis, “Changes in state: From phase transitions to nucleation and aggregation”. Lara’s thesis committee included her thesis advisor, Dr. James Kindt, and members Dr. Joel Bowman and Dr. Francesco Evangelista.

During her time at Emory, Lara contributed to the publication of four manuscripts:

1.  Patel, L. A.; Kindt J. T., Simulations of NaCl aggregation from solution: Solvent determines topography of free energy landscape. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2018. (Submitted)

2. Zhang, X.; Patel, L. A.; Beckwith, O.; Schneider, R.; Weeden, C.; Kindt, J. T., Extracting aggregation free energies of mixed clusters from simulations of small systems: Application to ionic surfactant micelles. J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2017, 13 (11), 5195–5206. (DOI: 10.1021/acs.jctc.7b00671)

3. Patel, L. A.; Kindt, J. T., Cluster free energies from simple simulations of small numbers of aggregants: Nucleation of liquid MTBE from vapor and aqueous phases. J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2017, 13 (3), 1023–1033. (DOI: 10.1021/acs.jctc.6b01237)

4. Patel, L. A.; Kindt, J. T., Coarse grained molecular simulations of DPPC vesicle melting. Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 1765-1777. (DOI: 10.1039/C5SM02560E)

Congratulations, Dr. Patel!

Congratulations, Dr. Morgan Vaughn!

On Wednesday, July 18th, Morgan Vaughn successfully defended her thesis, “Enzyme Dynamics Elucidated via Temperature Jump Fluorescence Spectroscopy”. Morgan’s thesis committee included her thesis advisor, Dr. Brian Dyer, and members Dr. Stefan Lutz and Dr. Vincent Conticello.

During her time at Emory, Morgan was awarded a Dean’s Teaching Fellowship and was selected as an ARCS Scholar. In addition, she served for a year and a half as the president of Emory’s graduate chapter of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) and is the proud author of a JACS Communications paper that was featured in JACS Spotlights.

Looking forward, Morgan plans to pursue a career in facilitating science communication in the classroom, to the general public, and/or among scientists.

Congratulations, Dr. Vaughn!

Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Jose Soria Named “Emory Williams Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award” Winner

As Senior Lecturer for the Department of Chemistry, Dr. Jose Soria has taught lectures and laboratories ranging from introductory 100-level courses to 400-level advanced courses. His sees the classroom as a space for scientific discussion and the sharing of ideas, an approach which has been well-received by his students and undergraduate TAs. Dr. Soria’s dedication to his student’s and unique teaching style were recently recognized with the Emory Williams Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching Award. The award is given in recognition of a record of excellence in teaching, contributions to curriculum development in the awardee’s academic discipline, and pedagogical innovation.

As a young child growing up in Mexico, Dr. Soria was curious about science. He recalls playing with fireworks and doing “experiments” with his neighbors during his grade school years before he even knew what chemistry was. In middle school chemistry courses, he was fascinated by the changing structures and properties of compounds. After taking his first laboratory class, he was totally captivated.

Dr. Soria earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in chemistry from Universidad Nactional Atonoma before moving to the United States to pursue is doctorate degree here at Emory University. Following graduation, Dr. Soria opted to apply for his green card, allowing him to stay at Emory to complete a postdoc in the lab of Dr. Dennis Liotta. During this time, he became interested in teaching. He took a part-time position at a local two-year college where he could teach classes in the evenings. His experiences in the classroom lead him to apply for more permanent teaching positions, ultimately landing him back at Emory as a member of chemistry’s lecture-track faculty.

His classroom now is based primarily on free-flowing discussions. “When I go into the classroom, I have a plan of what we are going to discuss, but the way that it is discussed is not planned. It is not rehearsed because each community, each group, is different,” says Dr. Soria. He values creating a space that encourages students to speak up about their ideas, ask their questions, and grow as scientists together. Reflecting on an early experience during his teaching career, Dr. Soria explains that a group of minority students approached him and expressed their appreciation for the way he explained his research. That interaction influenced the way he continues to structures his class, with a focus on making the complex concepts more approachable through discussion and application.

Dr. Soria’s willingness to mentor also resonates with his students. “I think the thing that really stands out to me about Dr. Soria’s teaching style is his dedication to mentoring his students. When I told him I was going to be applying for grad schools, he asked to meet up with me so that we could talk about the process, what I should look for in a school, what questions I should ask, and what kinds of programs would be the best fit for me,” says recent chemistry graduate Daniel Salgueiro (EC’18, Blakey Group). “All in all, Dr. Soria is a very supportive and helpful professor, and I recommend all of his classes to anyone who asks me.”

Dr. Soria’s most recent undergraduate TAs, Eddy Ortega (EC’18, Liebeskind Group) and Nilang Shah (EC’18, Levin Group) also have wonderfully positive things to say about his teaching. “Dr. Soria values the environment of his class, the spirit of discussion, and teamwork,” says Eddy. “He loves pushing students to achieve their full potential and promotes students to give concise and well thought answers,” added Nilang.

Dr. Soria remembers seeing a colleague win the Williams Award twelve years ago and thinking “I want to be like him”. He worked hard to build his credentials since then, developing the courses that are now so greatly appreciated by his students. Support for his ideas from chemistry chairs—five in his career, so far!—and collaboration with other faculty and staff have also contributed to his development. The supportive community has helped Dr. Soria during his ongoing project of building a supportive, and now award-winning, classroom.