Welcome to the Fall 2018 Entering Graduate Class!

We are excited to announce the names of our 2018 entering cohort. This group of early career scientists is distinguished by their broad research experience and training, including summer REUs and participation in programs including:

  • DAAD-Rise Fellowship
  • Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP)
  • Emory STEM Research Symposium
  • Barry Goldwater Scholarship
  • McNair Scholars
  • NIH Initiative to Maximize Student Development (IMSD)

A majority of the class has at least one paper published or under review. Many students have experience with mentoring, including undergraduate TA, tutoring, and Peer Leader appointments. As a group, these students also share long-term engagement in volunteer projects and STEM outreach. While a majority of the class is joining Emory directly from their undergraduate careers, a handful  are moving on to the PhD track from post-grad laboratory careers. Several will be the first in their family to earn a PhD.

In addition, this class includes:

  • a former zookeeper/science educator
  • a pair of former college roommates
  • a Starbucks “Coffee Master”
  • a “Most Athletic” award winner
  • an Emory College alum and the child of an Emory College alum

Each of these students has their own story to tell and incredible potential to draw on Emory resources to forge an amazing scientific career.

Entering Class of 2018

Ryan Allen
Villanova University

Paul Beasley
Earlham College

Tamra Blue
Georgia State University

Ting Cheng
Peking University

Adrian Demeritte
St. John’s University

Zackery Dentmon
Mercer University

Christella Dhammaputri
Emory University

Ordy Manuela Gnewou
Lehman College

Ayda Gonzalez de la Nuez
Bard College

Amber Harris
James Madison University

Sheng He
Dalian University of Technology

Cecilia Hendy
College of Charleston

Michael Hollerbach
College of Charleston

Yuesong Hu
Lanzhou University

Renke Huang
Southern University of Science and Technology

Alyssa Johnson
College of Charleston

Diane Karloff
Duke University

Sara Konecny
Georgia Institute of Technology

David Laws
Coastal Carolina University

Maizie Lee
California State University – Fresno

Qinyi Lu
University of Science and Technology

Andrew Mahoney
Gettysburg College

Brea Manuel
Louisiana State University – Baton Rouge

Sam Mckinnon
Mississippi State University

Quincy McKoy
University of Richmond

Duong Nguyen
Mount Holyoke College

Selma Piranej
Loyola University – Chicago

Jessalyn Rogers
Western Washington University

Chase Schultz
Alma College

Jack Sharland
Bowdoin College

Racheal Spurlin
North Carolina State University

Jiayue Sun
Syracuse University

Tiffany Trieu
University of Central Florida

Ailing Yu
Lanzhou University

Cassandra Zaremba
Xavier University

 

Chemistry Postdocs Featured in the Science Writers Committee Quarterly Newsletter

The Science Writers Committee (SWC), part of the Postdoctoral Fellows Association (PDA),  is a group of postdocs with a knack for writing. In addition to disseminating information and announcements for the PDA, the SWC publishes a quarterly newsletter, each with a unique topic of interest. This Spring 2018 edition of the newsletter focused on Infectious Diseases and featured articles from Michelle Kim, Claire Jarvis, and Kim Clarke.

“The postdoc science writers magazine is a great venue to practice a different, important style of science communication,” says Claire, co-chair of the committee with Michelle Kim and editor of the newsletter. “As PhDs and postdocs we’re taught to write about our research in a very technical, formulaic way for publications or grants: we become very fluent in that language. To actually communicate our science to the public, we need to deprogram ourselves.” In addition, she hopes the magazine will give postdocs the confidence to communicate science to a diverse audience. “Some of the writers tried to downplay their writing abilities with me before they started…then they produced great pieces!”

Click here to check out the full newsletter.

Want to get involved with the science writers? Contact the PDA at emorypda [at] gmail [dot] com!

GRExit: Why We’re Dropping the GRE

The Science Commons Atrium in Emory’s Atwood Chemistry Center.

What is GRExit? A silly term for a big decision. Starting in Fall 2019, Emory’s Department of Chemistry is joining the “GRExit” wave by dropping the GRE test from our graduate application process.

The GRE (or “Graduate Record Exam”) administered by the Educational Testing Service has been a factor in graduate school admissions since the 1950s. At Emory, we have long required the test as one piece of a package intended to allow us to gauge how well students might do in our program. We are committed to the practice of whole file review, meaning we review all of the materials a student submits instead of using any one factor to “weed out” students from our applicant pool. In the past, we relied on this practice to mitigate any outsize impact on GRE scores. However, we were still faced with interpreting scores as a piece of the puzzle….and over time, our graduate committee found that it was very hard to look past particularly high or low scores as they reviewed the remainder of a file.

Added to that impression, we had access to data on students who accept our admissions offer and matriculate. We haven’t found the GRE to be a very good indicator for student success in the first year of our program. Our sample size is small compared to the large number of students who take the test, but there is more research out there that we can rely on. For instance, consider the following:

Research has also consistently shown that the GRE introduces bias into the review process, disadvantaging women, minorities, and students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Some references of note:

We are very concerned about minimizing bias in our admissions process. Our entire graduate admissions team undergoes training about the role of implicit bias in their day-to-day life (a program that draws heavily on the book Blindspot.) We have also piloted the use of a shared evaluation form to help faculty review applications with the same questions in mind. And we are always considering new ways to minimize bias in our review process. With issues of efficacy, predictive value, and bias in mind, removing the GRE from our process seemed like the right path. It’s a decision we may revisit if new research or testing options make the GRE more useful. But for now, we are confident that “GRExit” is the way to go.

What does this mean for you as an applicant? Simply put, you do not have to take the GRE to apply to the Emory chemistry graduate program. We will still practice whole file review – we look forward to reading your personal statements, seeing your faculty of interest selections, and hearing the perspective of your recommenders. We also love when students submit the optional video statement!

Because we are committed to this path, we will not be accepting test scores in the application even if you want to report them. If we receive scores from some students but not from others, we reintroduce potential biases from this test, particularly as we suspect that students are understandably more likely to submit high scores. We will carefully review all of the information that we do request and feel confident in our ability to make a thorough review of each application without the assistance of GRE scores.

As another tangible benefit, we hope this will lessen the financial burden of the application process. You do not need to pay to send your scores to Emory, to take test prep classes or buy test prep books, or to sit the test itself.

What do you think about GRExit? Does it make you more or less likely to apply to Emory? Are you planning to take the GRE for other applications? Are you happy to skip it?

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Please feel free to share your comments and, as always, to contact our program if you have any questions.

Planning to apply? Visit chemistry.emory.edu/apply. Applications open September 1st, 2018 and are due by December 1st, 2018 for entry in Fall 2019.

Want to learn more about chemistry @ Emory? Fill out an inquiry form to join our mailing list!

Congratulations, 2017-2018 Graduates!

On Monday, May 14th, the Department of Chemistry celebrated the graduation of 63 undergraduate chemistry majors and 16 new PhDs. Congratulations to all of our graduates!

Jonah M. Adler
Raviteja Alla
Yusur Alsalihi
Eric Andreansky, Ph.D.
Rebecca Anne Bartlett, Ph.D.
Nia Nicole Bilal
Nika Braiman
Yulei Cao
Mandy Chan
Yuan Chang, Ph.D.
Bryant Chica, Ph.D.
Lekha Chilakamarri
Emily Bridget Crawford
Marika Deliyianni
Wallace Derricotte, Ph.D.
Long Di
Jose Armando Espinoza
Richard Xin Feng
Divine Joseph Francis
Up Next: Graduate School
Kyle E Giesler, Ph.D.
Akash R Gogate
You Na Ha
Ian I Heaven
Gillian G Hecht
Up Next: Graduate School at Columbia University Mallman School of Public Health(Future plans to attend medical school)
Daisha Holton
Up Next: PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences (Job offer for Teach for America in Houston)
Lillian Theresa Hough
Heejin Hur
Jessica Anna Hurtak, Ph.D.
Currently: Postdoc in the Tan Laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan
Cheston Husein
Ban-Seok Jeong, Ph.D.
Lisa Wang Jin
Yao Jing, Ph.D.
Verka Elena Williams Jordanov
Se Min Jung
Shashank Kalanithi
Parisa Keshavarz-Joud
Up Next: Research Technician with the Lutz Lab at Emory
(Future plans to attend graduate school for chemistry)
Carly Ryan Kies
2017-2018 Excellence in Undergraduate Educational Support Award (1st Year Mentor)
Up Next: Campus ministry in Australia for a year
Mooeung Kim, Ph.D.
Vishaal Kondoor
Georgia Kossoff
Carli Brooke Kovel
2018 Bobby Jones Scholar
Sang Don Kwan
Up Next: Medical school in Korea
Thomas Lampeter
Adonias C Lemma
2017-2018 Excellence in Undergraduate Educational Support Award (1st Year Lab TA)
Up Next: Emergency Department Medical Scribe with the Emory University Hospital
Yichen Li
Up Next: Grow Trainee in Manufacturing Department for BASF in Shanghai, China
Kuangbiao Liao, Ph.D.
Up Next: Senior Scientist at Abbvie Inc.
Yuhgene Liu
Samir Martin
Garett Michael
Charles Modlin, Ph.D.
Eddy Cristian Ortega
Analia Parana
Lilanni Perez
Thomas Nicholai Preiser
Chengyang Qian
Zheng Qiao
Ashwin Ragupathi
Up Next: Research Technician at MSKCC (Future plans to attend medical school)
Shambavi Jay Rao
Rolando Felipe Rengifo, Ph.D.
Adam M Ring
2017-2018 Excellence in Undergraduate Educational Support Award (2nd Year Lab TA)
Gabriela Rodriguez Bengochea
Daniel Rodriguez
Daniel Cristian Salgueiro
2017-2018 Outstanding Chemistry Major Award
2017-2018 Undergraduate Award in Organic Chemistry
Vivek Sawhney
Noah Allen Setterholm, Ph.D.
Nilang Nandlal Shah
Zoe Simon
Up Next: PhD in Chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh
Houston Hartwell Smith
2015 Recipient of the Early Career Achievement Research Grant
2017-2018 Excellence in Undergraduate Research Award
2017-2018 ACS P-Chem Award
Andrew Donald Steele, Ph.D.
Leann Quertinmont Teadt, Ph.D.
Matthew John Tucker
Catherine Urbano
Up Next: Medical School at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Katherine June Woolard
2016 Excellence in Undergraduate Education Award (General Chemistry Lab)
Benjamin Aaron Yosen
Junchu Zeng
Up Next: MS in Operations Research at Columbia University
Qingwan Zhang
Xiancong Zhang
Xiaoyi Zhang

 

Congratulations, 2017-2018 Award Winners!

Congratulations to all of our 2017-2018 award winners!

 Undergraduate Student Awards

Outstanding Chemistry Major:

Daniel Salgueiro

Excellence in Undergraduate Research:

Houston Smith

Excellence in Undergraduate Educational Support:

Analytical: Frances Connor

1st Year Mentor: Carly Kies

2nd Year Mentor: Brett Weingart

1st Year Lab TA: Adonias Lemma

2nd Year Lab TA: Adam Ring

Outstanding 1st year Chemistry Student:

Alex Tang

Sarah Hanson

Early Career Achievement Research Grant:

Nathan Harper (Widicus Weaver)

ACS P-Chem Award

Houston Smith

Undergraduate Award in Analytical Chemistry       

Liz Enyenihi

Undergraduate Award in Organic Chemistry

Daniel Salgueiro

William Jones Scholarship

Sam Zinga

Laura Briggs

Dian Ruby Ding

Paul Greenstein

Graduate Student Awards

Quayle Outstanding Student Award

Pui Yan “Victor” Ma (Salaita)

Quayle Senior Student Award

Colleen Keohane (Wuest)

Qiuyang Li (Lian)

Quayle Student Achievement Award

Benjamin Fontaine (Weinert)

Qi Yu (Bowman)

Amy Solinski (Wuest)

Ziwei Guo (Kindt)

Shannon Rivera (Weinert)

Ally Boyington (Jui)

Outstanding TA Award

Analytical:

Alexia Prokopik (Dyer)

Ha An Nguyen (Dunham)

Physical:

Nicholas Stair (Evangelista)

Organic:

Amber Scharnow (Wuest)

Cameron Pratt (Jui)

General:

Victoria Snider (Hill)

Elaine Liu (MacBeth)

Physical:

Carson Powers (Widicus Weaver)

Congratulations, Dr. Noel Xiang’ An Li!

Photo credit: Dr. Shaoxiong Wu

On Wednesday, April 25th, Noel Xiang’ An Li successfully defended his thesis, “Amyloid-beta strain amplification and their connection to tau in Alzheimer’s Disease”. Noel’s thesis committee included his thesis advisor, Dr. David Lynn, and members Dr. Stefan Lutz, Dr. Vincent Conticello, Dr. Lary Walker (Emory Neurology), and Dr. Yury Chernoff (GA Tech Biological Sciences).

Noel is applying for jobs in the pharmaceutical/biotech industry while wrapping up some experiments in the Lynn Lab.

Congratulations, Dr. Li!

Congratulations, Dr. Andrew Steele!

On Friday, April 13th, Andrew Steele successfully defended his thesis, “Natural Products Enabling Biological Discovery: Promysalin and Baulamycins”. Andrew’s thesis committee included his thesis advisor, Dr. William Wuest, and members  Dr. Huw Davies and Dr. Dennis Liotta.

Since moving with the Wuest Group to Emory, Andrew has published two papers, bringing his publication count to five. Andrew will be starting a post-doctoral position at Scripps in Florida where he will be working in the lab of Dr. Ben Shen.

Congratulations, Dr. Steele!

Congratulations, Dr. Yao Jing!

On Wednesday, March 28th, Yao Jing successfully defended her thesis, “Structure-Activity Relationship and Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship of GluN2C/D Subunit Selective Antagonists of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor”. Yao’s thesis committee included her thesis advisor, Dr. Dennis Liotta, and members  Dr. Frank McDonald, Dr. Stephen Traynelis, and Dr. Emily Weinert.

Yao is currently searching for a job with an eye toward healthcare data science.

Congratulations, Dr. Jing!