Huw Davies Receives the Herbert C. Brown Award for Creative Research in Synthetic Methods

Congratulations to Dr. Huw Davies for being named the recipient of the Herbert C. Brown Award for Creative Research in Synthetic Methods given by the American Chemical Society for 2019. This award recognizes  outstanding and creative research involved in the discovery and development of novel and useful methods for chemical synthesis.

National award winners were honored at a ceremony in conjunction with the 257th ACS National Meeting on Tuesday, April 2nd, 2019 in Orlando, Florida.

Congratulations, Dr. Davies!

Dr. Dennis Liotta Receives the Alfred Burger Award in Medicinal Chemistry

Dr. Dennis Liotta received the American Chemical Society Alfred Burger Award in Medicinal Chemistry for 2018 for inventing antiviral drugs taken by more than 90% of persons infected with HIV in the United States. The award, established in 1978 by GlaxoSmithKline, recognizes outstanding contributions to research in medicinal chemistry. Dr. Liotta will be presenting an award address at the spring meeting of the ACS Division of Medicinal Chemistry.

This award is the most recent in Dr. Liotta’s impressive collection of accolades. He is the recipient of the Thomas Jefferson Award, the highest award given by Emory University,  the 2005 Herty Medal, sponsored by the GA Section of the ACS, the 2011 IP Legends Award, sponsored by Georgia State University College of Law and J. Mack Robinson College of Business, and the 2003 Biomedical Industry Growth Award, sponsored by the Georgia Biomedical Partnership. In addition, Dr. Liotta was elected to the National Academy of Inventors in 2014 and the Medicinal Chemistry Hall of Fame in 2010, and he received Honorary Doctor of Science degrees from both the University of Queensland and Queens college.

Congratulations, Dr. Liotta!

ChEmory Awarded Travel Grant for the 225th ACS National Meeting

ChEmory, Emory’s undergraduate American Chemical Society Student Chapter, was recently awarded the National Meeting Travel Grant for the 255th ACS National Meeting. The meeting this year, which will take place in New Orleans, LA between March 18th and 22nd, is titled “Nexus of Food, Energy, and Water”. The $300 grant award will provide financial support to members of ChEmory who will be traveling to New Orleans to attend the national meeting.

Congratulations, ChEmory!!

2017 National Chemistry Week: Chemistry Rocks!

This week, October 22nd -28th, the American Chemical Society will be celebrating the 30th Anniversary of National Chemistry Week. The goal of National Chemistry Week is to promote the value of chemistry in everyday life. ACS members and science enthusiasts are encouraged to spread awareness of chemistry by organizing events for ACS local sections, schools, businesses, and the general community.

In 1987, former ACS President Dr. George Pimentel organized a national event to celebrate the impact of chemistry. This single day of celebrating science evolved into an annual week-longevent where the scientific community engages in education and outreach. The events of the week are accompanied by the publication of Celebrating Chemistry, a booklet designed to engage and educate children in the basic principles of chemistry and to inspire the next generation of future scientists.

The theme of National Chemistry Week for 2017 is “Chemistry Rocks!”, which focuses on geochemistry. Topics include the chemistry of salt, the types of rock within the Earth’s crust, and the difference between a rock, a mineral, and a gemstone. Some activities in Celebrating Chemistry include growing crystals from Epsom salt and testing mud samples for clay content.

Previous topics of National Chemistry Week include “Solving Mysteries Through Chemistry”, “Chemistry Colors Our World”, “The Sweet Side of Chemistry—Candy”, and “Energy: Now and Forever”. Next year, events will focus around outer space in “Chemistry Out of this World”.

To spark widespread interest and appreciation for chemistry is a goal also shared with our graduate student social and service organization, Pi Alpha Chemical Society (PACS). On Thursday, October 26th, PACS and Graduation Generation, a collaborative family-school-university-community partnership, will host an outreach event at Toomer Elementary School involving 20-minute science demonstrations for kids in third through fifth grade. In addition, ChEmory, our undergraduate chemistry club will host a series of events in honor of National Chemistry Week including an alumni career seminar, science demonstrations, and periodic table cupcake baking!

Outreach opportunities like those presented by PACS, ChEmory, and National Chemistry Week give us the chance to share our love of chemistry and science with the community. Through education and outreach, we can cultivate an appreciation for chemistry and inspire the next generation to become as passionate as we are.

Interested in learning more about National Chemistry Week? Check out the ACS website! If you are interested in getting involved with the PACS outreach event, contact Elaine Liu.

 

ChEmory events this week:

Tuesday, October 24th

Demo Show: 6:30-7:30 pm at Memorial Student Center E208

            Wednesday, October 25th

ChEmory at Wonderful: 12-2 pm in Asbury Circle

Periodic Table Cupcake Baking: 7-8 pm in the LSM Kitchen

            Thursday, October 26th

Periodic Table Cupcake Decorating: 7-8 pm in the LSM Kitchen

ChEmory Recognized by the ACS

ChEmory students pose at their booth during the ACS meeting in San Fransisco.
ChEmory students pose at their booth during the ACS meeting in San Fransisco.

ChEmory, Emory’s undergraduate chemistry club, has been recognized by the American Chemical Society as a Commendable chapter for 2016-2017. This places ChEmory in the top 10-20% of all undergraduate ACS chapters.

2017-2018 is also shaping up to be an excellent year for ChEmory. The club has been awarded two ACS grants for activities–a Community Interaction Grant and a New Activities Grant.

Congrats to the ChEmory officers and members for all their hard work!

Bill Wuest Receives 2017 ACS Infectious Diseases Young Investigator Award

Bill WuestBill Wuest has been named one of three recipients of the 2017 ACS Infectious Disease Young Investigator Award given by ACS Infectious Diseases and the ACS Division of Biological Chemistry.  Winners received a plaque, an award of $1,000, and up to $500 in travel reimbursement to attend the 2017 ACS Fall National Meeting in Washington, D.C., and present at an ACS Division of Biological Chemistry symposium in their honor. In addition, they were honored at the ACS Infectious Diseases Young Investigator Awards Symposium during the meeting.

Brooke Howell interviewed Dr. Wuest regarding the honor.

What’s next in your research?

With my group’s recent move to Emory University, I felt that this would be an ideal time to expand our research focus beyond bacterial biofilms and look into other areas antibacterial research. More specifically, we are looking to expand our “narrow-spectrum” research program with a focus on Pseudomonad-specific therapies in collaboration with the CF-Atlanta group. Likewise, we also plan to work closely with the Antibiotic Resistance Center here at Emory to further investigate mechanisms of antibiotic resistance development by both using our current, and continuing to develop, chemical probes.

Read the full article in the ACS Axial.

ChEmory Students Reflect on Attending the ACS Meeting in San Fransisco

ChEmory students pose at their booth during the ACS meeting in San Fransisco.
ChEmory students pose at their booth during the ACS meeting in San Fransisco.

For the past three years, the Department of Chemistry has been pleased to sponsor undergraduate travel to the annual American Chemistry Society meeting in San Fransisco for members of ChEmory, our undergraduate ACS club. The travel awards are generously funded by the J. Sam Guy Memorial Fund. Four students who attended this year share their reflections below:

Katie Woolard

As a chemistry major, it is always inspiring to attend the National ACS meeting whenever I can. This year I had the opportunity to network with other scientists and meet a few other students who are attending the same graduate program as I am in the fall. This year I took extra time to talk with vendors in the Expo Hall to better understand the machines that go into a lab as well as job opportunities at different chemical companies after graduate school. I always make a point to attend the Kavli Lectures, as they are interesting topics that are made  accessible to all knowledge levels through TED-talk style presentations. In addition to the Kavli Lectures, I took time to go to several talks on organic synthesis and natural product synthesis, as this is what I hope to focus on when I get to graduate school. These talks helped give me a better understanding of the chemistry that goes into these projects and fed my passion for research.

Jessica Southwell

I represented ChEmory at the American Chemical Society national meeting in San Francisco. I enjoyed meeting students from other ACS chapters, and learning about their programs. I also had the opportunity to go to a few lectures including one on CRISPR and some in the LGBT* graduate symposium, which was a good intersection of chemistry and my sociology minor.

Lucas Man

The ACS conference was a good opportunity for me to speak with graduate school to which I received acceptance letters for more specific information that I could not get easily get off of the internet. In addition, I found the lecture from DOW on the state of the academic system, and their solution to the funding problem, to be enlightening. I also found the job fair interesting, even though none of the jobs ended up being a good fit. The job fair gave me insight to what jobs in industry look for and what day to day life in the workforce outside of academia was like. Getting the opportunity to see the city was also a great experience.

Daniel Salgueiro

Attending the ACS conference in San Diego was an eye-opening experience for me. The demo exchange allowed is to interact with other undergraduates to see how they implement outreach programs in their home town, and how many ways there are to visually demonstrate chemistry. Additionally, I was able to network with graduate school recruiters and learn what PHD and master’s program admissions are looking for in a candidate. However, I did more than just networking on this trip. I attended multiple lectures on hot new research topics, as well as lectures involving the intersectionality of one’s own identity and their research. All in all, it was an amazing experience where I learned about how integral chemistry is to our lives.

Student Spotlight: For Julia Gensheimer, Chemistry is a Passion

Julia Gensheimer in an ACS chemistry t-shirt that she designed.
Photo: Julia wears a t-shirt she designed for a contest prior to the 2016 ACS meeting. Julia’s design—designed in ChemDraw – won over 70% of the votes in an online contest to choose a conference t-shirt. “It began as chemistry doodles that I thought looked like letters,” says Julia. The shirt was for sale during the ACS conference in Philadelphia.

“I can’t imagine doing chemistry anywhere else!”

That was what Julia Gensheimer (EC ’19) told her mother after going on a tour of the new addition to Emory chemistry’s Atwood Hall. With its soaring atrium, shiny new labs, and innovative teaching space, it’s easy to see how the Atwood Addition could get a student excited about chemistry. However, Julia’s tour took place in the summer of 2015, while the building was still being built.

“It was exciting to have an exclusive tour for students interested in chemistry,” says Julia of the hard-hat tour of the construction site led by chemistry Director Todd Polley.

Julia’s ability to see potential in the unknown brought her to Emory and it’s part of what makes her such a successful chemistry major. Julia is excited about what chemistry offers—and what it doesn’t.  “In the lab, you are looking for an answer to some research question and if you answer that question, you ask another one! You search and you re-search,” says Julia. “There is always something to discover.”

As a freshman, Julia enrolled in CHEM 221Z, an accelerated course for students with AP credit. The class was taught by Jose Soria and Dennis Liotta. Julia was excited to be working with top researchers as a freshman and the course further fueled her interest in chemistry. Dennis Liotta says, “Julia has excelled at everything she’s done at Emory. As far as I’m concerned, she’s a future superstar.”

“Julia is great,” agrees Stefan Lutz, Julia’s sophomore biochemistry instructor. “She is an enthusiastic student and a hard worker.”

While Julia is a rising star (and a self-described “chemistry fangirl”) that doesn’t mean coursework and research come easy. In fact, says Julia, “chemistry doesn’t come naturally to me at all!” Like many students, Julia found organic chemistry challenging, but the community she built in the classroom carried her through. “They are some of my best friends,” she says of her organic classmates, “We formed a little organic chemistry family and continue to take classes with each other. We study together and support one another.”

A "Sciku" submitted by Julia during the 2017 Atlanta Science Festival. The poem was selected as a first-round winner for the Sciku contest.
A “Sciku” submitted by Julia during the 2017 Atlanta Science Festival. The poem was selected as a first-round winner for the Sciku contest.

Outside the classroom, Julia has been involved in research in the Rafi Ahmed Lab in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology since February 2016. She’s building on experience she gained in high school after spending two summers in the lab of Dr. Michael Jensen at the Ben Towne Center for Childhood Cancer Research in Seattle.

How did a high schooler end up traveling across the country to get involved in cutting-edge cancer research?

She asked.

“I saw an advertisement about a cancer treatment without radiation or chemotherapy, known as immunotherapy at Seattle Children’s. The initiative was led by Dr. Michael Jensen and in minutes, I became his number one fan. So, I emailed him. To my surprise and utter joy, I received a reply and got the internship! I flew from my small town in Kentucky to Seattle where I volunteered full-time in the Jensen laboratory.”

The lab invited Julia back the next summer for ten weeks (funded in part by Emory’s Civic Scholars Program) where she completed an independent project. Her time in the Jensen lab also sparked another interest: triathlons.

Of course, in chemistry you can work hard and achieve. But triathlons—you must have an aptitude for those, right? Or at least experience?

“Maybe,” says Julia. “I did a triathlon my sophomore year of high school because I competed on the swim team at the time. After a triathlon hiatus, my lab members convinced me to participate in a triathlon relay over the summer. I enjoyed it so much that I joined Emory’s club triathlon team and finished my second triathlon last September. I will race again in the spring! I’m a terrible runner though so I really have to train for that part.”

Taken together, Julia’s accomplishments tell a story about a student who isn’t afraid to try, to test, to take risks. “I wouldn’t be happy if I wasn’t constantly challenged in some way.” Her next challenge? A summer research experience in the Ahmed Lab continuing her work in cancer immunology.

She isn’t exactly sure what she wants to do next – maybe a career in chemistry and biology research, most likely on the MD/PhD track. Or possibly on some track that hasn’t been built yet. Because if anyone can find the next cool thing and take off in pursuit, it’s going to be Julia Gensheimer.

Love Your Major Week: Celebrating ChEmory

For Love Your Major Week, we’re highlighting our undergraduate chemistry majors in a series of blog posts. Interested in declaring a chemistry major? See Ms. Ethel Ellington in Atwood Hall 380 for assistance!

A ChEmory member shows off the cornstarch dance pit at Mole Day.
A ChEmory member shows off the cornstarch dance pit at Mole Day.

ChEmory is Emory’s award-winning American Chemistry Society club. They’ve been recognized with the ACS Green Chapter Award for three years running and in 2013, they were featured as an Outstanding Chapter with a photo on the cover of the ACS magazine. ChEmory holds a general meeting each month during the school year where members can explore chemistry in-depth. Past meetings have included a look at the chemistry behind molecular gastronomy, jewelry making using chemical etching, and instruction in chemistry demos.

ChEmory students learn to make balloon animals at a monthly meeting for use in liquid nitrogen demos.
ChEmory students learn to make balloon animals at a monthly meeting for use in liquid nitrogen demos.

ChEmory has also been a featured part of the Atlanta Science Festival each year since it began in 2013. Last year, they were part of the parade that took place downtown during the Exploration Expo making chemistry ping pong ball clouds.

Not all ChEmory students are chemistry majors, but everyone in ChEmory loves sharing chemistry with the community! ChEmory frequently visits local elementary schools to share science demos. And every year, ChEmory reminds the Emory community of the fun behind the chemistry with their National Chemistry Week demo show and Mole Day Party.

The Periodic Table of Cupcakes on Mole Day
The Periodic Table of Cupcakes on Mole Day