Research from the Dunham Lab Wins Cozzarelli Prize

Congratulations to Dr. Christine Dunham and colleagues on their recent publication in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This manuscript has won the journal’s Cozzarelli Prize, which recognizes one outstanding contribution each year to each of the six disciplines of the National Academy of Sciences and celebrates “scientific excellence and originality”.

The manuscript entitled “Mechanism of tRNA-mediated +1 ribosomal frameshifting” discusses ribosomal frameshifting, a perturbation of the protein assembly process. With an enhanced understanding of this process, we can begin to understand more about how proteins are synthesized as well as how some antibiotics can hijack this process and re-engineer it for new applications.

To read more about this, click [here]!

Francesco Evangelista Receives Grant for Quantum Information Science Research

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced $218M in funding for research in the emerging field of Quantum Information Science.

Francesco Evangelista, recipient of the 2017 Dirac Medal and the 2018 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, is the lead PI for $3.9M of this funding for his research on “Quantum Chemistry for Quantum Computers.” The award is the first that Emory has received to study quantum computing.

The Quantum Information Science program seeks to lay the foundation for future innovation in the realm of computing and information processing. The awards, made in conjunction with the White House Summit on Advancing American Leadership in Quantum Information Science, are led by scientists at 28 higher learning institutes and 9 DOE national laboratories. Research funded by the awards will span a range of topics from the new generation of quantum computers to using quantum computing for understanding cosmic phenomena.

The abstract for Dr. Evangelista’s “Quantum Chemistry for Quantum Computers” appears below:

“Over the past fifty years, quantum chemistry has had a transformative impact on chemistry and materials science by enabling the computational prediction of properties and reactivity of molecules and materials. Two factors have made this success possible: the development of efficient theories of electronic structure and the steady growth of computing power. Nevertheless, quantum chemistry methods are currently unable to tackle strongly correlated molecules and materials, owing to the exponential complexity of the fundamental physics of these systems. Quantum computers manipulate information using quantum mechanical principles and offer a solution to this problem. With the rapid development of quantum computing hardware and algorithms, there is a realistic expectation that quantum computers will outperform their classical counterparts within the next decade. However, the first generation of quantum computers is unlikely to have a transformative impact on chemistry and materials science unless their power is leveraged by combining them with new algorithms specifically designed to take advantage of quantum hardware. The objective of this research is to create the next generation of quantum chemistry methods for strongly correlated molecules and solids that will run on the first generation of quantum computers. This research will also develop standard benchmarks for testing the accuracy and computing power of new quantum hardware and will validate prototypes of quantum computers in collaborations with industry partners. More generally, this project paves the way to applications of quantum computers to study challenging strongly correlated systems critical to the mission of the DOE such as transition metal catalysts, high-temperature superconductors, and novel materials that are beyond the realm of classical simulation.”

Congratulations, Dr. Evangelista!

Check out the video to learn more about the amazing research happening in the Evangelista lab!

Jen Heemstra and Bill Wuest Named Scialog Fellows

Bill Wuest. Photo by Jessica Lily Photography for Work+Play.
Jen Heemstra. Photo by Jessica Lily Photography for Work+Play.

Associate Professors Dr. Jen Heemstra and Dr. Bill Wuest have both been named Scialog Fellows for the Chemical Machinery of the Cell. Scialog, supported by the Research Corporation for Scientific Advancement and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation,  aims to advance human knowledge by supporting and empowering early career scientists. Fellows work in community with other scientists in their theme area to learn and discover through the give-and-take of community building among multidisciplinary teams.

The Scialog on the Chemical Machinery of the Cell is based on the conviction that the time is right to bring together chemists and biologists to spark collaborations and develop interdisciplinary

Bill Wuest. Photo by Jessica Lily Photography for Work+Play.
Bill Wuest. Photo by Jessica Lily Photography for Work+Play.

projects that will catapult us to a deeper understanding of chemical machinery and reactions in the intact cell. The group will explore questions such as “How does the cell organize reactions in functionally distinct compartments that are not bound by membranes?” and “What combination of new chemical tools including chemical probes, optical techniques, and quantum methods can bring about molecular resolution of the chemical machinery in intact, living cells?”

Jen and Bill will have the opportunity to engage with other Chemical Machinery of the Cell fellows at the upcoming Scialog conference in Tucson, Arizona.

Congratulations, Jen and Bill!

 

Craig Hill Elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry

Craig L. Hill, Goodrich C. White Professor of Chemistry, has been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). RSC Fellows must have spent five years or more in a senior position and be judged to have contributed work of impact in the chemical sciences. Professor Hill’s research encompasses fundamental structural and reactivity studies, catalysis, functional nanomaterials and solar energy conversion. He has over 20,000 citations with a current h index of 71. In addition to his membership in the RSC, Dr. Hill is an elected member of the Academia Europea, a Fellow of the American Associate for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a nominator for the Nobel Prizes in Chemistry, and an ACS Herty Medal Winner, among other accomplishments.

Congratulations, Dr. Hill!

Widicus Weaver Receives CAREER Award

Congratulations to Susanna Widicus Weaver for receiving an NSF CAREER Award. From the NSF website:

CAREER: The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.