Join the CRC Emory Freezer Challenge!

By: Elena Jordanov (EC ’18)

The Carbon Reduction Challenge (CRC) was started at the Georgia Institute of Technology by climatologist, Dr. Kim Cobb, over 11 years ago. The Challenge began as a course for students to take part in, pushing them to think of new initiatives to decrease carbon emissions in the atmosphere and develop cost-benefit analyses to incentivize Georgia Tech to engage in these initiatives.

In the past couple years, CRC evolved beyond the classroom via undergraduate and graduate students’ co-op programs with companies in the Greater Atlanta area.  As increased involvement and success of the student-led CRC occurs, it will be demonstrated that carbon reduction initiatives are feasible for large companies, universities, and developed cities to implement.

This past Spring 2018 semester was the first semester Emory University joined the challenge.  Through connections between Emory’s Climate Analysis and Solutions Team’s (ECAST) Daniel Rochberg and Dr. Cobb, the first CRC team at Emory was developed. The team includes Elena Jordanov (B.S. in chemistry, minor in philosophy), Miranda Mitchell (B.S. in environmental science, B.A. in political science) and Ken Wakabayashi (B.A in chemistry, B.S. in environmental science).

The Emory CRC team has partnered with the Office of Sustainability Initiatives (OSI) and developed an initiative to reduce carbon dioxide emissions through refrigerator and freezer management.  Project Drawdown, a multi-national research effort that assessed the viability and effectiveness of possible strategies for decreasing potential global carbon dioxide emissions, ranked refrigerant management as the #1 strategy.  After auditing a subset of the freezers and refrigerators in the Chemistry Department’s Atwood and Emerson buildings, the team estimates that at least 5.5% of these buildings’ total CO2 emissions results from powering cold storage equipment.  The two buildings together emit 650,000 lbs of CO2 per month, and spend $38,000 each month on the energy creating these emissions.

In order to decrease these emissions, the CRC team has created an Emory Freezer Challenge, based off of the North American Freezer Challenge.  In this challenge, chemistry labs will compete to implement fridge and freezer management strategies each month and gain the most points. To begin, a pilot challenge will take place from May 20th-August 31st in order to get feedback from Principal Investigators and lab managers on what works and does not work about the Emory Freezer Challenge.  The Emory Freezer Challenge is 100% voluntary, and labs can get a substantial amount of points by choosing any management methods that work best for them.  The Challenge has also been designed to not give labs with more equipment the advantage during the competition; labs get points for enrolling each of their equipment and supplying the manufacturer’s label.  The label contains the power consumption information that are used in baseline energy consumption calculations.

One innovative aspect about the Emory Freezer Challenge is that the team will obtain a holistic picture of the total CO2 emissions produced from the Chemistry Department’s equipment by supplying energy consumption meters to labs that volunteer to use them.  The team has been funded for a limited supply of meters and thus 3-4 meters will be implemented in laboratory equipment that are representative samples of different types of equipment, such as -80 and -20 freezers, 4 degree fridges and refrigerator-freezer cabinets.

Due to this structure, the first labs to volunteer for the Emory Freezer Challenge and to have a meter in their lab are more likely to win the most points.  Labs who apply for Tier 1, Tier 2, and Tier 3 are all eligible for a meter. Follow the link below to sign up your lab and join the Emory Freezer Challenge!

Sign up: https://goo.gl/forms/mdiPxIY3jztsq7hk1

Above is a great example of a before and after equipment organization from the Quave lab in the School of Medicine.  On the left, you can see a more disorganized, frosted freezer. On the right, all samples are organized in racks, which the CRC team is happy to provide.  The new, managed freezer has also been defrosted, which greatly increases the efficiency of the freezer. Also, making sure all equipment is full impacts the efficiency of a freezer or refrigerator.  Placing foam blocks or ice packs where there is free space in a refrigerator or freezer, as well as consolidating as many samples as possible into one equipment, are all viable options for improving freezer and refrigerator management.

By properly managing samples within lab equipment, the goal is to not only make refrigerators and freezers more efficient, but lab members as well.  By having a proper inventory of where items are and prioritizing accessibility, lab members will increase their efficiency during experiments.

Getting Green Lab Certified is a lot easier than most think.  Follow this link to get more information on how you can do it, and be eligible for funding to implement sustainability innovations in your lab!  The Blakey Lab and Wuest Lab in Chemistry have done it; you can too!

Green Labs at Emory

Anyone can be a part of the CRC team, including undergraduates, graduate students, and post-docs.  If interested, please email crcemory [at] gmail [dot] com or fill out the form below!

Sign Up: https://goo.gl/forms/pzkOjA8jMv7jibaX2

 

Chemistry Major Michelle Stofberg Featured in ACS “Lab Tales” Book

Michelle Stofberg
Michelle Stofberg

Chemistry major Michelle Stofberg (EC ’17) is featured in a new book from the American Chemical Society, The Power and Promise of Early Research from the ACS Symposium Series. Michelle’s story about her first experiences in the lab appears in the chapter “Lab Tales: Personal Stories of Early Researchers.” Michelle describes her first encounters with laboratory research at Emory in her own words, including Introductory Chemistry II with Dr. Nichole Powell at Emory’s Oxford College and laboratory work with Brenda Harmon. Currently, Michelle is an undergraduate researcher in the Liebeskind Lab. Michelle was also a summer SURE researcher at Emory.

An excerpt from “Lab Tales”:

Sharing my research experiences with others helped me appreciate just how extraordinary these research opportunities were and reflect on how much I have learnt. As I explained before, a researcher studies unknowns. This task seemed rather daunting to me at first; however, I soon realized that there was something spectacular about delving into the unfamiliar. I saw the beauty of challenging the unknown and the joy of discovery. Of course, I do not mean discovery as a stagnant, completed act, but as a fluid, ongoing process. In other words, research is wonderful for it is a challenging process of understanding and learning. It challenges you to face your weaknesses and bolster your strengths; it forces you to consider the world through a different, inquisitive lens; it helps you realize your passions; and it lets you grow as a student and as an individual.
Congratulations, Michelle!
[Lab Tales] (subscriber access)

Chemistry Course “How Do We Know That? 2,500 Years of Great Science Writing” Featured by Emory News

Doug Mulford teaching chemistry in the new Atwood chemistry building. Photo by David Johnson for Univ. Marketing.
Doug Mulford teaching chemistry in the new Atwood chemistry building. Photo by David Johnson for Univ. Marketing.

Doug Mulford’s Fall 2016 course, “How Do We Know That? 2,500 Years of Great Science Writing”, has been featured by Emory News as a “critical” course offering a fresh perspective on high profile issues. From the article:

How Do We Know That? 2,500 Years of Great Science Writing

Instructor: Douglas Mulford, senior lecturer, Chemistry

Cool factor: What did Darwin actually say? Einstein? Mendel? Should we clone humans? Can chocolate cause weight loss? What is the placebo effect anyway and why do I care? Was Galileo just a really big nerd? (Yes!) The course will look at how humans learn by looking at the original words of scientists throughout history. Occasional demonstrations, explosions and liquid nitrogen ice cream provided.

Course description: This is not a science class but scientific learning will be the framework for this study. This discussion-based first-year seminar will focus on how humans have learned knowledge throughout the history. Discourse will examine humans’ ways of discovery by looking at 2,500 years of great science writing to discover how science is done and how human knowledge as a species grows.

Department and school: Chemistry in Emory College

[Full Article]

Chemistry Staff Recognized at the ECAS Service Awards

Stephenie Thioubou (center) received recognition for ten years of service at the 2-16 ECAS Service Awards. Photo by Emory University Department of Chemistry.
Stephenie Thioubou (center) received recognition for ten years of service at the 2016 ECAS Service Awards. Pictured with (l-r) Todd Polley, Felicia Allen, Ethel Ellington, Stefan Lutz. Photo by Emory University Department of Chemistry.

Chemistry staff were recognized for service milestones at yesterday’s Emory College of Arts and Sciences Service Awards held in the Science Commons Atrium. The awards were presented by interim Dean Michael Elliot. Bruster’s ice cream was served and each milestone awardee received an Emory blanket and a certificate in recognition of their years of service.

Milestone Awardees:

Yimin Wang (5 years)

Huanyu Zhao (5 years)

Stephenie Thioubou (10 years)

Demetra Jackson (15 years; Dean’s Office)

Bing Wang (15 years)

Joonbum Park (20 years)

Congratulations!

Dean Robin Forman (l) pictured with Tim Stephens.
Dean Robin Forman (l) pictured with Tim Stephens.

The event also offered ECAS staff an opportunity to thank Dean Robin Forman for his service before he leaves for a new position at Tulane.

 

Emory College Computing Support Seeks Senior Desktop Consultant for the Department of Chemistry

"New Website Soon Come" is a CC BY-SA 2.0 licensed photo by aesop on Flickr
“New Website Soon Come” is a CC BY-SA 2.0 licensed photo by aesop on Flickr

Update 09/21/16: This position has been filled.

Emory College Computing support is hiring a Senior Desktop Consultant to provide service to the Department of Chemistry. The full job advertisement is reproduced below. Candidates must visit Emory’s job search portal to apply (search for position number 62914BR.).

Senior Desktop Consultant

830030:ECAS: Infrastructure

62914BR

Job Description

JOB DESCRIPTION:

Emory College Computing Support is actively seeking a Senior Desktop Consultant to service our Chemistry department. This lead position will serve as the primary contact and technical consultant for Chemistry faculty, staff and researchers.

The individual will provide proactive and reactive multi-platform software and hardware support for desktop, workstations and mobile devices. This includes the secure connectivity to campus networks and services. Technology tools will consist of but are not limited to ServiceNow, Active Directory, Heat LANRev, Bomgar remote, Microsoft Deployment Tools, PrintFleet and DeployStudio.

In addition to the care and support of productivity equipment, this position will be the primary contact person for technology enabled teaching spaces and institutional technology teaching tools. As a lead member of Emory College Computing Support, this position will assist in mentoring junior members of the team and will be expected to participate in technology projects that support Emory College.

Strong written and verbal communication, an ability to quickly solve problems, and a focus on leading IT solutions toward sustainable paths will be successful skills to have.

FORMAL JOB DESCRIPTION: Analyzes, designs, recommends, and implements micro-based Local Area Networks. Installs and configures Local Area Network servers and related hardware and software. Analyzes, designs, recommends and implements workstation connectivity. Consults with and assists with system enhancements and modifications. Provides technical support, documentation, project implementation management, and design modifications to meet business objectives. Troubleshoots desktop and connectivity problems.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Five years of information technology experience OR a bachelor’s degree and three years of information technology experience.