We’re Hiring: Assistant Professor of Chemistry (2 positions)

New laboratory space in the Atwood Addition.

The Department of Chemistry at Emory University invites applications for two tenure-track faculty positions at the rank of Assistant Professor; one open to all areas of chemistry and one with a focus in inorganic chemistry, broadly defined. The successful applicant will be expected to teach at the undergraduate and graduate levels, to build and maintain a vibrant and impactful externally-funded independent research program, and to participate in faculty governance of the department and university. The appointee will join the department during an exciting period as we grow into new and renovated research space and advance our commitment to the teacher-scholar model of excellence in both the classroom and laboratory

Application review will begin on September 15; to ensure full consideration, all materials should be received by October 15. 

Application Instructions

Please submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statement of research interests, teaching philosophy, and a statement addressing past activities and future plans to advance equity, inclusion, and diversity in your professional career.

Ready to apply? Visit our ad on Interfolio to submit your materials: https://apply.interfolio.com/53372

Questions? chemsearch [at] emory [dot] edu

Congratulations, 2017-2018 Graduates!

On Monday, May 14th, the Department of Chemistry celebrated the graduation of 63 undergraduate chemistry majors and 16 new PhDs. Congratulations to all of our graduates!

Jonah M. Adler
Raviteja Alla
Yusur Alsalihi
Eric Andreansky, Ph.D.
Rebecca Anne Bartlett, Ph.D.
Nia Nicole Bilal
Nika Braiman
Yulei Cao
Mandy Chan
Yuan Chang, Ph.D.
Bryant Chica, Ph.D.
Lekha Chilakamarri
Emily Bridget Crawford
Marika Deliyianni
Wallace Derricotte, Ph.D.
Long Di
Jose Armando Espinoza
Richard Xin Feng
Divine Joseph Francis
Up Next: Graduate School
Kyle E Giesler, Ph.D.
Akash R Gogate
You Na Ha
Ian I Heaven
Gillian G Hecht
Up Next: Graduate School at Columbia University Mallman School of Public Health(Future plans to attend medical school)
Daisha Holton
Up Next: PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences (Job offer for Teach for America in Houston)
Lillian Theresa Hough
Heejin Hur
Jessica Anna Hurtak, Ph.D.
Currently: Postdoc in the Tan Laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan
Cheston Husein
Ban-Seok Jeong, Ph.D.
Lisa Wang Jin
Yao Jing, Ph.D.
Verka Elena Williams Jordanov
Se Min Jung
Shashank Kalanithi
Parisa Keshavarz-Joud
Up Next: Research Technician with the Lutz Lab at Emory
(Future plans to attend graduate school for chemistry)
Carly Ryan Kies
2017-2018 Excellence in Undergraduate Educational Support Award (1st Year Mentor)
Up Next: Campus ministry in Australia for a year
Mooeung Kim, Ph.D.
Vishaal Kondoor
Georgia Kossoff
Carli Brooke Kovel
2018 Bobby Jones Scholar
Sang Don Kwan
Up Next: Medical school in Korea
Thomas Lampeter
Adonias C Lemma
2017-2018 Excellence in Undergraduate Educational Support Award (1st Year Lab TA)
Up Next: Emergency Department Medical Scribe with the Emory University Hospital
Yichen Li
Up Next: Grow Trainee in Manufacturing Department for BASF in Shanghai, China
Kuangbiao Liao, Ph.D.
Up Next: Senior Scientist at Abbvie Inc.
Yuhgene Liu
Samir Martin
Garett Michael
Charles Modlin, Ph.D.
Eddy Cristian Ortega
Analia Parana
Lilanni Perez
Thomas Nicholai Preiser
Chengyang Qian
Zheng Qiao
Ashwin Ragupathi
Up Next: Research Technician at MSKCC (Future plans to attend medical school)
Shambavi Jay Rao
Rolando Felipe Rengifo, Ph.D.
Adam M Ring
2017-2018 Excellence in Undergraduate Educational Support Award (2nd Year Lab TA)
Gabriela Rodriguez Bengochea
Daniel Rodriguez
Daniel Cristian Salgueiro
2017-2018 Outstanding Chemistry Major Award
2017-2018 Undergraduate Award in Organic Chemistry
Vivek Sawhney
Noah Allen Setterholm, Ph.D.
Nilang Nandlal Shah
Zoe Simon
Up Next: PhD in Chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh
Houston Hartwell Smith
2015 Recipient of the Early Career Achievement Research Grant
2017-2018 Excellence in Undergraduate Research Award
2017-2018 ACS P-Chem Award
Andrew Donald Steele, Ph.D.
Leann Quertinmont Teadt, Ph.D.
Matthew John Tucker
Catherine Urbano
Up Next: Medical School at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Katherine June Woolard
2016 Excellence in Undergraduate Education Award (General Chemistry Lab)
Benjamin Aaron Yosen
Junchu Zeng
Up Next: MS in Operations Research at Columbia University
Qingwan Zhang
Xiancong Zhang
Xiaoyi Zhang

 

Congratulations, 2017-2018 Award Winners!

Congratulations to all of our 2017-2018 award winners!

 Undergraduate Student Awards

Outstanding Chemistry Major:

Daniel Salgueiro

Excellence in Undergraduate Research:

Houston Smith

Excellence in Undergraduate Educational Support:

Analytical: Frances Connor

1st Year Mentor: Carly Kies

2nd Year Mentor: Brett Weingart

1st Year Lab TA: Adonias Lemma

2nd Year Lab TA: Adam Ring

Outstanding 1st year Chemistry Student:

Alex Tang

Sarah Hanson

Early Career Achievement Research Grant:

Nathan Harper (Widicus Weaver)

ACS P-Chem Award

Houston Smith

Undergraduate Award in Analytical Chemistry       

Liz Enyenihi

Undergraduate Award in Organic Chemistry

Daniel Salgueiro

William Jones Scholarship

Sam Zinga

Laura Briggs

Dian Ruby Ding

Paul Greenstein

Graduate Student Awards

Quayle Outstanding Student Award

Pui Yan “Victor” Ma (Salaita)

Quayle Senior Student Award

Colleen Keohane (Wuest)

Qiuyang Li (Lian)

Quayle Student Achievement Award

Benjamin Fontaine (Weinert)

Qi Yu (Bowman)

Amy Solinski (Wuest)

Ziwei Guo (Kindt)

Shannon Rivera (Weinert)

Ally Boyington (Jui)

Outstanding TA Award

Analytical:

Alexia Prokopik (Dyer)

Ha An Nguyen (Dunham)

Physical:

Nicholas Stair (Evangelista)

Organic:

Amber Scharnow (Wuest)

Cameron Pratt (Jui)

General:

Victoria Snider (Hill)

Elaine Liu (MacBeth)

Physical:

Carson Powers (Widicus Weaver)

Emory Report: Chemistry synthesizes radical overhaul of undergraduate curriculum

The Emory Report features a story on chemistry’s new undergraduate curriculum, Chemistry Unbound.

For the science dedicated to studying how properties interact and change, chemistry has been static for decades in how it is taught.

That changes this fall, as Emory College of Arts & Sciences positions itself as a leader in teaching undergraduates the “central science” that links biology, physics and more with a revamp of its entire undergraduate chemistry curriculum.

While some colleges have changed individual classes, Emory is the first major research university to completely overhaul how it teaches chemistry, from introductory courses to capstone senior seminars

Read the entire article at the Emory Report.

We’re Hiring: Graduate Program Coordinator

Graduate students at an outreach event at Fernbank Museum. Photo provided by Pi Alpha Chemical Society.
Graduate students at an outreach event at Fernbank Museum. Photo provided by Pi Alpha Chemical Society.

The Department of Chemistry is seeking a graduate program coordinator for the Department of Chemistry.  To apply, please visit the Emory Careers portal. The position number is 71103BR.

Program Coordinator-Emory College: Chemistry

831010:ECAS: Chemistry

71103BR

Job Description

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS

Experience with the following:

  • Student orientation
  • Student advising
  • Grad course scheduling
  • Course registration
  • Student payroll – coordinate for Department and RAS financial offices
  • Teaching Assistant placement
  • Research rotation placement and mentor choice
  • Student awards and recognition
  • Maintaining records of student progress
  • Annual reports
  • Career placement for internal assessments
  • Program grant applications

FORMAL JOB DESCRIPTION

  • Primary duties are organizing, coordinating, and planning operational facets of a program and its related activities which include, but are not limited to the following: establishing long-term operational objectives, researching factors that may impact the success of the program, and working with individuals or groups to research and document program requirements in order to provide appropriate input into the development of strategic plans.
  • Develops work plans to accomplish program goals and objectives and monitors progress toward their achievement.
  • Conducts research and gathers information to develop various publications.
  • Develops promotional materials which may include content for reports, briefings, newsletters, grants or other written information related to the program.
  • Assists in developing and coordinating program-related conferences, conventions, or meetings.
  • Monitors expenditures and may participate in the budget planning process and prepare financial reports.
  • May assist in identifying funding resources and developing fund-raising strategies and initiatives.
  • Prepares operational and statistical reports.
  • Conducts training, represents the program at meetings and conferences, and networks with affiliated groups.
  • May supervise assigned project staff, interns and/or volunteers.
  • Performs related responsibilities as required.
  • This is not an administrative support position.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

Bachelor’s degree in a field related to the program and two years of related experience, or an equivalent combination of education, training and experience.

Operating Unit/Division

Emory College

Full/Part Time

Full-Time

Regular/Temporary

Regular

Minimum Hourly Rate $

19.086538

Midpoint Hourly Rate $

25.576923

Minimum Annual Rate $

39700

Midpoint Annual Rate $

53200

This position involves:

Not Applicable

We’re Hiring: Emory College Seeks Accountant for the Department of Chemistry

"Numbers Everywhere" is a CC BY-S.A. 2.0 licensed photo by Flickr user Bridget Coila.
“Numbers Everywhere” is a CC BY-S.A. 2.0 licensed photo by Flickr user Bridget Coila.

The Department of Chemistry is seeking an accountant. (Our current accountant, Stephenie Thioubou, is retiring! Good luck, Stephenie! We will miss you!) To apply, please visit the Emory Careers portal. The position number is 69858BR.

Accountant-Emory College-Chemistry Department

831010:ECAS: Chemistry

69858BR

Job Description

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Proficient in Word, Excel and Outlook. Willingness to learn new software solutions.
  • Experience in basic accounting: accounts receivables, accounts payables, & general journal entry knowledge: 2 years of recent experience.
  • Independent, problem-solving abilities, detail-oriented, highly organized, with strong communication skills.
  • Ability to multi-task.
  • Effective interpersonal skills and flexibility.

FORMAL JOB DESCRIPTION:

  • Performs routine professional accounting duties requiring limited independent judgment.
  • Monitors, audits and reconciles departmental accounts.
  • Researches and creates new accounts and codes.
  • Prepares journal transactions, balances accounts, reconciles errors and takes corrective action.
  • Assists in the preparation and monitoring of departmental budgets.
  • Advises management of cash deficits.
  • Prepares audit schedules in support of internal and external audits.
  • Maintains databases and assimilates financial and statistical data.
  • Prepares routine operational and statistical reports.
  • May assist with computer operations for the department.
  • May maintain departmental grants and monitor petty cash activity.
  • May coordinate invoice preparation, payables and/or receivables.
  • Performs related responsibilities as required.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field OR equivalent combination of experience, education, and training.

Operating Unit/Division: Emory College

Full/Part Time: Full-Time

Regular/Temporary: Regular

Minimum Hourly Rate $19.086538

Midpoint Hourly Rate $25.576923

Minimum Annual Rate $39700

Midpoint Annual Rate $53200

 

Love Your Major Week: Celebrating ChEmory

For Love Your Major Week, we’re highlighting our undergraduate chemistry majors in a series of blog posts. Interested in declaring a chemistry major? See Ms. Ethel Ellington in Atwood Hall 380 for assistance!

A ChEmory member shows off the cornstarch dance pit at Mole Day.
A ChEmory member shows off the cornstarch dance pit at Mole Day.

ChEmory is Emory’s award-winning American Chemistry Society club. They’ve been recognized with the ACS Green Chapter Award for three years running and in 2013, they were featured as an Outstanding Chapter with a photo on the cover of the ACS magazine. ChEmory holds a general meeting each month during the school year where members can explore chemistry in-depth. Past meetings have included a look at the chemistry behind molecular gastronomy, jewelry making using chemical etching, and instruction in chemistry demos.

ChEmory students learn to make balloon animals at a monthly meeting for use in liquid nitrogen demos.
ChEmory students learn to make balloon animals at a monthly meeting for use in liquid nitrogen demos.

ChEmory has also been a featured part of the Atlanta Science Festival each year since it began in 2013. Last year, they were part of the parade that took place downtown during the Exploration Expo making chemistry ping pong ball clouds.

Not all ChEmory students are chemistry majors, but everyone in ChEmory loves sharing chemistry with the community! ChEmory frequently visits local elementary schools to share science demos. And every year, ChEmory reminds the Emory community of the fun behind the chemistry with their National Chemistry Week demo show and Mole Day Party.

The Periodic Table of Cupcakes on Mole Day
The Periodic Table of Cupcakes on Mole Day

 

Doug Mulford’s Scientific Writing Course Featured in the Dooley Report

Doug Mulford teaching chemistry in the new Atwood chemistry building. Photo by David Johnson for Univ. Marketing.
Doug Mulford teaching chemistry in the new Atwood chemistry building. Photo by David Johnson for Univ. Marketing.

Doug Mulford’s freshman seminar is featured in this week’s Dooley Report, the weekly ebulletin sent to all Emory students. From the article:

“If you have a better understanding of the history of knowledge, you realize the things we think are true now are going to change, and you have to be open to that new learning,” says Douglas Mulford, senior lecturer of chemistry and the director of undergraduate studies for Emory’s chemistry department.

Mulford’s first-year seminar, “How Do We Know That: 2,500 years of Great Science Writing,” aims to help students develop those skills by delving into scientific claims of the past and present as well as the ethics that go with scientific advancement.

Part science literature and part critical thinking, the course is one of several first-year courses offered under Emory’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP), “The Nature of Evidence: How Do You Know?”

Read the full story online at the Dooley Report.

Research Spotlight: Analytical Chemistry Out of the Lab and Into the WaterHub

Students in their laboratory safety gear outside the WaterHub.
Students in their laboratory safety gear outside the WaterHub.

By: Laura Briggs (EC ’19)

Sometimes, being in an academic lab setting can feel a bit pointless. Instructors and TAs are there to help you every step of the way, procedures are laid out for you step-by-step, and everyone pretty much knows what the “right” result should be. I understand that this method helps you learn techniques and reinforce concepts, but it definitely isn’t what I’ve experienced in a real research setting.

Dr. Jeremy Weaver’s analytical chemistry lab has been a fun and fulfilling change of scenery from step-by-step lab work. Our class visited the WaterHub with sample collection bottles and got a hands-on look at the real science that goes on there (I talk more about the WaterHub experience here). Then, we took the samples back into the lab to do some real research.

Dr. Weaver famously says that analytical chemistry is the class where data accuracy and precision matter the most. But for the WaterHub project, he took a more open-ended approach. He didn’t give us a procedure to follow; instead, we spent a week scouring the Internet and the scientific literature to figure out what to do. And when we asked if a certain procedure would work, Dr. Weaver encouraged us to go for it, give it a shot, and see what happened.

Using the techniques we learned in lab, including gas chromatography, titrations, and spectrophotometry, we determined (somewhat successfully) the phosphate and aluminum concentrations of the water, along with “water hardness” – a fancy term for the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and a few other ions in a water sample. These are values that water quality testers would measure during a routine check of water quality.

Of course, without a surefire procedure to follow, it took a couple of tries to work out the kinks. My portion of the project was to determine the phosphate concentration of the WaterHub samples using UV/Vis spectrometry. The concept behind this technique is simple – you add an agent to your sample that creates a color change, and the degree to which the color appears corresponds to the concentration of the sample. The first time I added my coloring agent to each sample, absolutely nothing happened – even when I knew that there was a ton of phosphate in the sample!

The process of research, as we learned, is full of troubleshooting and setbacks. But eventually, I found the amount of phosphate in the WaterHub water! Boy, did I feel accomplished because I found the procedure and performed the experiments myself. Even in an academic lab setting, it is possible to conduct real research, answer real questions, and engage with the Emory community on a larger level. Dr. Weaver’s WaterHub project brought the esoteric techniques of quantitative analytical chemistry and gave them new life through a real-life application.

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Laura BriggsLaura Briggs is a sophomore majoring in chemistry and dance. Laura is a Woodruff Scholar and the Vice President of the Emory Swing Dance Club. She is also a member of the Emory Dance Company and hosts a weekly, science-themed radio show. Laura is a research assistant in the Weinert lab, where she studies really cool bacteria that attack potatoes. Laura plans to pursue either a Ph.D. in biochemistry or a master’s in science writing.

To learn more about the WaterHub, check out this link from Campus Services!

http://www.campserv.emory.edu/fm/energy_utilities/water-hub/

First Person: Discovering the WaterHub at Emory

Analytical chemistry students listen to a tour guide at the WaterHub at Emory.
Analytical chemistry students listen to a tour guide in the front hall of the WaterHub at Emory.

By: Laura Briggs (EC ’19)

I didn’t know that the WaterHub existed until this semester, which is a shame because it’s right in my backyard. From my dorm room at 15 Eagle Row, I can see the greenhouse and the mysterious metal trapdoors embedded in the grassy area near Peavine Creek Drive. But it wasn’t until my analytical chemistry lab trekked across campus, collection bottles and safety goggles in hand, that I learned how awesome the WaterHub really is.

One of the first things you see when you enter the WaterHub is a banana tree, happily flourishing among the greenery in the heat and humidity. Besides providing me with a bit of joy, the tree is working full-time for a greater cause. Its roots are the centerpiece of a hydroponic reactor beneath the greenhouse that harnesses the natural design of plants to provide efficient and stable water treatment.

As our tour guide explained to the class, the WaterHub recycles up to 400,000 gallons of water every day, meeting almost 40% of Emory’s total water needs. Don’t worry, though- our guide reassured us that repurposed sewage is not coming out of the water fountains. Instead, the recycled water heats and cools buildings and helps flush toilets in some of Emory’s dorms.

How does this Cinderella transformation occur? The treatment process begins with a series of moving bed bioreactors to settle out and digest the – um – solid components of sewage. These large tanks contain a floating plastic netting system where bacteria can settle and grow into compact communities called biofilms.

Different kinds of bacteria proliferate in different bioreactors, and the WaterHub puts each of them to work cleaning various components of the wastewater. Oxygen levels control the types of bacteria that flourish. One bioreactor is completely anaerobic, encouraging the growth of bacteria that can “denitrify” the water, reducing dangerous nitrates into harmless nitrogen gas. Other bioreactors have different oxygen conditions, and the microbes that grow there perform other functions.

The next step in the process also relies on nature; a vast network of plant roots dips down into a series of hydroponic reactors, providing maximum surface area for more junk-eating microbes to inhabit. Alongside the plants, there’s also an artificial system of textile webbing to provide additional filtration.

At this point in the treatment system, the water is pretty clear, and almost all contaminants have been removed. Still, the process isn’t over. Water passes through a clarifier and a filter, removing any remaining solids, nutrients, and color from the water. Finally, any straggling biological contaminants are zapped away with a combination of chlorine and ultraviolet (UV) light. Our class sampled this fully-repurposed water to test for various contents (Here is my blog post exploring this process in-depth!)

The WaterHub – once a mystery to me – is a brilliant marriage of sustainability, engineering, chemistry, and biology right on Peavine Creek Drive! Thanks to Dr. Weaver’s analytical chemistry lab course, I can now look out my dorm room window and appreciate the source of the water that heats the building on these cold winter nights – and the beautifully-evolved natural processes that keep it clean.

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Laura BriggsLaura Briggs is a sophomore majoring in chemistry and dance. Laura is a Woodruff Scholar and the Vice President of the Emory Swing Dance Club. She is also a member of the Emory Dance Company and hosts a weekly, science-themed radio show. Laura is a research assistant in the Weinert lab, where she studies really cool bacteria that attack potatoes. Laura plans to pursue either a Ph.D. in biochemistry or a master’s in science writing.

To learn more about the WaterHub, check out this link from Campus Services!

http://www.campserv.emory.edu/fm/energy_utilities/water-hub/