Congratulations, Dr. Marika Wieliczko!

Marika Wieliczko defended her thesis, “Innocent and Non-innocent Countercation Interactions in Transition Metal Oxidation Catalysts” on Wednesday, April 5th, 2017. Marika’s thesis committed was led by Craig L. Hill with Cora MacBeth and Brian Dyer as additional members.

During her time at Emory, Marika was a founding member of SciComm, the graduate student science communications group. She was also an organizing member of the recent “Sickle & Flow” benefit concert that raised money for research into sickle cell disease.

Following graduation, Marika will be based in Washington, D.C. where she has a position in editorial development for the Royal Society of Chemistry in North America. Specifically, she will be working with the inorganic, nano, materials, and chemical engineering as well as general chemistry journals. 

Congratulations, Marika!

Previously:

Chemistry Graduate Students Raise Awareness with Sickle and Flow Concert

Chemistry Graduate Students Raise Awareness with Sickle and Flow Concert

Close up of Sickle & Flow ATL Flyer
Close up of Sickle & Flow ATL Flyer

Chemistry graduate students helped to raise awareness of sickle cell disease with “Sickle & Flow,” a hip hop benefit concert. The concert took place on Saturday, June 18th in Edgewood. Proceeds raised from the concert–which featured Command, Bassmint Fresh, Ariel Simone, and many more–will benefit the Sickle Cell Foundation of Georgia.

IM Atlanta highlights the contributions of Marika Wieliczko (Hill Group) to the concert:

Working together with the team at SciComm, [Matthew] Lewis [Emory MD/PhD Candidate] and Wieliczko began to reach out to different artists and musicians to discuss the different ways they could leverage Atlanta. The thought was that in order to better connect the scientific and medical communities with the public, they needed to tap into the culture that drives the city forward. “The nightlife, the music, the history of this place is so incredible,” says Lewis. “There are a lot of young people and a high proportion of African-Americans. We got to thinking: what if we could combine that youth culture, that music and arts vibe that is so strong in Atlanta, and try to partner with these organizations together and celebrate the lives of people affected by sickle cell?”

Other Emory chemistry students volunteered their efforts to help make Sickle & Flow happen including Becky Bartlett (Conticello Group), Carson Powers (Widicus Weaver Group), and Keon Reid (Kindt Group).

[Full Article in IM Atlanta]

[Emory SciComm on Facebook]