New California Performance Test on July 2017 Bar Exam

The State Bar of California has previously announced that it will include a new California “Performance Test” on its bar exam, starting in July 2017.  The new CA PT will be 90 minutes long, and there only will be one CA PT,  instead of two MPTs (Multistate Performance Test) as in the past. According to the California bar admissions website, http://admissions.calbar.ca.gov/:

General Bar Examination The examination will be administered over two days with the following components:

1. One morning session during which three one-hour essay questions will be administered;

2. One afternoon session during which two one-hour essay questions and one 90-minute Performance Test will be administered; and

3. Morning and afternoon sessions consisting of three hours each, during which 100 multiple choice items for each session will be administered [the Multistate Bar Examination (MBE)].

The current understanding among law schools is that there will not be many differences in format between the new CA PT and the MPT, but there may be differences in the instructions. All of this is subject to change once the California State Bar releases more information. Check www.calbar.ca.gov  and admissions.calbar.ca.gov regularly and be ready to read the new instructions very carefully.

Deadline For Regular Registration for November MPRE is 9/15

If you are planning to take the MPRE in November 2016 (it is offered three times/year), the deadline for regular registration is this Thursday, September 15. Detailed information about how and when to register, fees, deadlines, etc. is on the National Conference of Bar Examiners website. From that website:

The Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) is a two-hour, 60-question multiple-choice examination developed by NCBE that is administered three times per year. It is required for admission to the bars of all but three U.S. jurisdictions (Maryland, Wisconsin, and Puerto Rico). (In addition, Connecticut and New Jersey accept successful completion of a law school course on professional responsibility in lieu of a passing score on the MPRE.) Because MPRE requirements vary from one jurisdiction to another, examinees are advised to check with the bar admission agency in the jurisdiction to which they seek admission before registering for the MPRE. Passing scores are established by each jurisdiction.

Remember that from now on, you will have various deadlines and requirements to meet for purposes of registering for, preparing for and taking a bar exam. It is your responsibility to research and keep up with those requirements, including by getting information directly from official sources. The only authoritative official source of information about the bar exam and bar admission in a given jurisdiction is that jurisdiction’s own Office of Bar Admissions or Board of Examiners website. Please make sure to bookmark the one for the state where you plan to take a bar exam, create an online account if that is available, and check both regularly. If you’re taking the November MPRE, good luck!

Important Changes To The MBE For 2017

The National Conference of Bar Examiners alerted law school deans yesterday about another change to the MBE starting in 2017 (they had previously announced an expansion of the scope of topics that might be tested in the category of Real Property). The 2017 MBE will still contain 200 questions, but unlike prior years, when 190 of those were actually scored and 10 were unscored experimental questions, the new MBE will only score 175 questions and 25 will be unscored experimental questions.

This means that each individual multiple choice question will count a bit more than in the past; and cumulatively, it will be more important for a bar taker to answer each one correctly. What this means for you, as an individual test-taker, is that test-taking skills and strategies will become even more important. In addition to paying attention to the added scope of Real Property topics and making sure you study the new topics, it will be more important than ever for you to do as many practice MBE questions as possible and review what strategies were most effective for you.

We will be offering (again) free MBE workshops for graduating students in the spring semester, so please plan to take advantage of at least one of those. You can come to all of them at no cost to you. Also, be sure to ask bar review course vendors for details about their MBE practice questions, such as how many of them are actual former MBE questions released by NCBEX, and how many will address the added subjects in Civil Procedure (added in 2015) and Real Property. Be aware that older MBE review materials will likely not include those new topics, including some that are on reserve for your use in the MacMillan Law Library.