Muscle Memory and Bar Readiness

Muscle Memory and Bar Readiness

I’m reposting this from the Law School Academic Support blog because it is such sound advice, from a longtime academic success educator: Muscle Learning and Bar Prep Success. If you came to Study Smarter as a 1L, to the session when I teach how to outline, you’ll know that I do believe deep learning is like weight-lifting: your brain only gets stronger when you do the heavy lifting and do the written work yourself, just as your muscles only get stronger when you actually lift the weights instead of reading about someone else’s weightlifting.

Muscle memory is also one reason why I suggest doing at least some of your (thousands of) practice MBE questions using pencil and paper, such as on the tests found in Emanuel’s Strategies and Tactics for the MBE, a book you can buy online (I’ve put a copy in the law library for you to look at if you wish). Not only does the Emanuel’s book use actual released MBE questions licensed from NCBEX, but practicing on paper with the kind of pencils you will use on the real MBE can only help; it certainly won’t hurt. If getting familiar with that helps your brain earn you one or two more points, that can mean the difference between passing and failing the bar exam. So use all the strategies available to you to fight for every point. Given the many changes in the MBE in recent years, it is NOT safe to aim for the minimum passing score — you should overshoot. You don’t have to ace this, but you do want a comfortable margin of points above the minimum score, to make sure you pass.

Please remember, as I’ve posted before, that our analysis of Emory Law’s bar passage rates over the last couple of years tells us that if you are an Emory JD student with a cumulative law school GPA below 3.2, regardless of LSAT or undergraduate GPA, you are at some risk of not passing the bar the first time you take it. If your Emory Law GPA is below 3.05, you are at higher risk of a poor outcome on the bar. Law school GPA is not the only risk factor an individual student might have; for more information, see the handouts outside Dean Brokaw’s office that have a chart of risk factors and how to address them. MOST IMPORTANTLY — RISK IS NOT DESTINY. You can dramatically improve your odds, in spite of any risk factors you may have, by identifying and addressing them strategically and thoroughly. We see this every year — students whose diligent, intelligent, disciplined summer study overcomes risk factors like low LSAT scores or GPAs, so that they pass the bar on their first attempt.

You’ll be hearing from us more often here as the bar gets closer; Jennie and I are here during the summer and we’re always happy to offer guidance and/or sympathy. Sometimes we have snacks.

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