Six Weeks to Go! A Plan, and Pets

Six Weeks to Go! A Plan, and Pets

Six weeks from today, most of you will be almost through your first day of the bar exam. Now is a great time to reassess your bar preparation plan and make any adjustments. If you haven’t yet established a productive daily routine, you should do that this week. You should treat bar study as a fulltime job if you aren’t working: getting up every morning at the time you will need to get up on the actual exam days, attending class (in person if that is an option, to reduce distractions), practicing good self-care, studying new material and reviewing older materials daily, keeping up with bar course assignments, and doing practice questions.

For most of this work, you should try to work in 60-90 minute blocs of time, then take a 5-10 minute break; human brains struggle to stay mentally focused for longer than 60-90 minutes at a time. Track your progress by using your bar course’s system to log your work; keeping up will help you stay motivated and on track. I recommend staying comfortably ahead of your cohort’s completion statistics, as those include people who have stopped studying and/or don’t plan to take the bar, so they pull down the averages.

Speaking of practice questions, some bar experts believe you should aim for doing AT LEAST 2000 practice MBE questions by the end of bar preparation. If you did the diagnostic workshops we held in February, you did 100 practice MBE questions in each workshop, and those count as long as you assessed your performance on them. Add up how many you’ve already done by now, and figure out how many more you need to do to reach 2000 by the weekend before the bar, then divide that up by how many days you have left and assign yourself that number to do every day, using all the resources of your commercial bar course and other supplements you may have. If your course offers spaced-repetition exercises or practice questions, that is an effective learning technique.

Profs. Riebe and Schwarz recommend doing MBE practice questions in sets of 34 per session, as that is how many you should ultimately be able to do in one hour on the real exam (100 questions per 3-hour session, morning and afternoon). One approach when you’re practicing is to start by seeing how long it takes you to finish 34 with a high level of accuracy; it will likely be more than one hour! Work on balancing accuracy, timing, and endurance, and develop a rhythm by daily practice. The goal is to work up to finishing 34 practice questions in one hour with a high percentage of correct answers. “High” is anything above 65-70%.

If you’re still reinforcing your knowledge of substantive law in some subjects, it’s fine to do your 34-question sets in one subject for now. After you do them, review both correct and incorrect answers to understand why each is right or wrong. As your recall and knowledge get stronger, you must shift toward doing mixed-subject practice sets. For instance, if you’re able to finish 34 practice questions in a single subject, in one hour, with 65% or more correct, you’re definitely ready for mixed question sets (you may be ready sooner). Don’t panic if your accuracy drops quite a bit when you go from single-subject sets to mixed-subject sets — it will! Pushing through that stage and persisting is where a lot of learning occurs. Keep doing the mixed sets, those are what you will see on the bar itself, and you WILL get better.

If you’ve persisted this far and you’re still reading, here is your reward: Happy Tails volunteers and their lovely dogs return to the law school tomorrow, Wednesday, June 19, to offer some puppy love and pet therapy. They’ll be in the Law Student Commons from 12:30-1:30 pm, so please join us! Doing something rewarding for yourself at the end of every productive day should also become part of your routine. You can do this!

 

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