Checklist For The Next Five Weeks

Here is a basic checklist you can use to assess your progress to date and make any necessary adjustments to your bar study routine. The bar exam starts five weeks from today. You still have time for self-assessment, feedback on practice questions, and adjustments to your study plan to keep your chances of passing first time as high as possible! Make the most of it!

  1. Review the bar study schedule you put in place at the start of your review course. Are you able to stick to it and stay on track? Does it include enough time for review AND doing practice questions? If not, consider revising it.
  2. Start shifting time from reading material to answering practice questions, both MBE and essays. Do what your course recommends for MPT questions.
  3. Acclimate yourself to the bar exam’s schedule by getting up and studying at the time of day when you will take the exam.
  4. Make sure you’re getting enough sleep and managing wellness/stress by eating right, taking reasonable study breaks and getting some exercise, even if just a 30-minute daily walk. Mens sana in corpore sano.
  5. Identify areas of strength and weakness among subjects, using all the tools your course provides. Target your weaker subject areas with more review and practice questions. Don’t avoid doing questions in your weaker subjects, that’s where you need the most practice.
  6. Increase the number of practice questions you do daily, with the goal of having done at least 2000 MBE practice questions and 5 or more released essay questions from the jurisdiction where you will take the bar, in addition to essay and MPT questions offered by your course, by the date of the bar exam.
  7. Check directions, instructions, technology and logistics for the bar exam site where you will be tested. Remember that in Georgia, Emory Law provides lunch on both days for all bar-takers at the GICC. Check especially to understand what you can and cannot take into the bar exam; enforcement is very strict and every year, there are examinees who are not allowed to take the bar or are disqualified because they overlooked instructions.
  8. If you will use a laptop, check now to make sure it is up to date and in top working order, with no viruses or bootleg software that could cause problems during the bar exam. Make sure it will get charged and stay charged during the exam and be sure to bring all necessary/allowed items such as chargers.
  9. Keep calm and carry on!

Congratulations to February Bar-Passers!

We just got the pass list for the February Georgia bar exam, and other states’ results are starting to come in. Congratulations to the 31 Emory Law grads who passed the Georgia bar in February! Those of you who will take it in July — take heart! You too can do this.

Shown above, with permission: Al Haidar, December 2015 grad, at his swearing-in.

Bar Exam Risk Factors

A number of factors may put you at risk for not passing the bar exam. According to Professors Riebe and Schwartz, in their book “Pass the Bar!”, these include:

  • Low LSAT score, low law school GPA or low class rank
  • Not taking a bar review course
  • Low grades in bar-tested courses, or not having taken them
  • Working or other time commitments like caregiving during the weeks before the bar
  • Nontraditional student status
  • Life crisis or major life event (good or bad) when you are preparing for the bar
  • Record of weak test skills, in essay and/or multiple-choice format
  • Lack of realistic, effective study and exam-taking strategies
  • Excessive fear or anxiety

However, every one of these risk factors can be addressed by taking specific remedial actions, which are listed and discussed in the book. And as the authors note:

Although each of the factors puts students at risk, none of them prevents students from passing. Many students have several of these risk factors yet still pass their bar exams. The factors merely reflect common characteristics of students who have failed in the past. By being aware of the risk factors and acting to minimize their effects, you can increase your likelihood of passing your bar exam.

If one or more of these risk factors applies to you, please make sure to take full advantage of ALL opportunities to do practice questions and attend workshops to learn more and better test-taking strategies for the bar!

Pass The Bar! Action Checklists and More

Two of the leading lights in law school academic assistance, Denise Riebe and Michael Hunter Schwartz, have a very helpful guidebook for law students called “Pass The Bar!“. It is a comprehensive guide to bar readiness, starting as early as 12 months before you start taking a bar review course after graduation. It includes action checklists, self-assessment tools, a decision grid to help you choose which commercial course to take, information about various aspects of bar exams, practice questions and sample answers, and appendices with all kinds of additional information and resources to help students get ready for this high-stakes test.

I highly recommend this book to all students who will graduate this spring, i.e. in six months. The very first action checklist covers the period 6-12 months before you start your post-graduation course, so now is a great time to get the book (available directly from Carolina Academic Press in hard copy or for Kindle, or from Amazon. com and other booksellers). Yes, you have exams coming up, but it’s important to start getting familiar with the skills you will need for success on the bar, while you still have one more semester in law school to address any deficits and strengthen them with help. Start working on that checklist now, and feel free to come ask anyone in the Office of Academic Engagement and Student Success if you have questions.

Swearing-In Ceremony for Alumni in Georgia

We look forward to welcoming dozens of young Emory Law alumni next week as they get sworn into the Georgia Bar in the place where it all began with Welcome Week: Tull Auditorium! Tuesday, November 10, 6-7:30 pm, with a reception for the new bar members and their families to follow. This is a great annual tradition and a highlight of the law school’s year. Class of 2016, this will be many of you next year!

Congratulations!

Congratulations to the Emory Law graduates who just got the good news that they passed the Georgia bar exam! We’re really proud of you and we hope to see many of you back at Emory Law in early November, to get sworn into the bar with your classmates. Look for an email invitation from our office of Alumni Relations. Congratulations again!

Emory Law Graduation