New York Bar Exam Rescheduled

NOTICES:

*NEW April 6, 2020*

COVID-19. UPDATE

The Board’s office is closed until further notice as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. Staff members are not presently available to answer phone calls. However, the Board continues to closely monitor the situation. The health and safety of applicants, our staff and the proctors who administer the bar exam are of paramount importance to the Board.

Updated information will be posted on this website as it is available.

JULY 2020 BAR EXAM: The New York Court of Appeals announced on March 27, 2020 that the New York State Bar Examiation will not be administered on July 28-29, 2020 as previously scheduledClick here to read the press release from the Court of Appeals.


The examination will be rescheduled to WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9-10, 2020. The application period for the rescheduled examination is presently scheduled to open on May 5, 2020 at 12:00 AM and to close on May 30, 2020 at 11:59 PM.

Additional information regarding the impact of COVID-19 on the July 2020 bar exam is available on NCBE’s website at: http://www.ncbex.org/ncbe-covid-19-updates/

NCBE Will Support Two Fall Bar Exam Dates

The National Conference of Bar Examiners has announced that it will make its materials available for two separate bar exam administrations this fall, in addition to the usual July dates:

To provide needed flexibility for jurisdictions and candidates, in addition to preparing materials for a July bar exam, NCBE will make bar exam materials available for two fall administrations in 2020: September 9-10 and September 30-October 1. Each jurisdiction will determine whether to offer the exam in July, in early September, or in late September.

NCBE also continues to update jurisidiction-specific information on its website:

NCBE continues to monitor the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation closely. The health and safety of bar applicants and of our employees and volunteers are of paramount importance to us. We will update this page as new information becomes available.

Click below to see which jurisdictions have made announcements about the July 2020 bar exam. 

 July 2020 Bar Exam: Jurisdiction Information

For answers to frequently asked questions, see the FAQs below this statement.

For ongoing information, go here: http://www.ncbex.org/ncbe-covid-19-updates/

It goes without saying that this is a rapidly changing situation, and bar jurisdictions are updating their decisions, deadlines and processes almost every day. The National Conference of Bar Examiners updates July 2020 Jurisdiction Information frequently; check that here. This blog will not cover all changes to all jurisdictions. Always check at www.ncbex.org and then at a specific bar jurisdiction’s official website for the most accurate, updated and authoritative information.

Bar Readiness, Remote Version

Welcome back to the Spring semester, Emory Law!  Even though we are not with you physically, we are still available and ready to assist you as you prepare for the bar exam.  Professor Rich Freer has recorded an introductory lecture regarding bar preparation, which you can view here. We have also rescheduled our series of MBE subject matter workshops (see schedule below). At these sessions, Rhani Lott 10L (with input from Dean Brokaw and the Dean’s Teaching Fellows) will walk you through the MBE’s scope of coverage as outlined by the National Conference of Bar Examiners. The sessions will be recorded, but we encourage you to take part live so you can ask questions.

Wednesday, April 1: 12:15pm

Wednesday, April 8: 6:30pm

Monday, April 13: 12:15pm

Wednesday, April 15: 6:30pm

We also encourage you to review the information here: Academic Engagement & Student Success: Bar Readiness; and to bookmark and subscribe to this blog, Emory Law Bar Readiness, so that you receive new bar-related blog posts. As always, go directly to the website of the jurisdiction where you plan to take the bar exam for specifics and deadlines. You can find a listing of those websites at www.ncbex.org.

Bar Readiness Update, March 13, 2020

Dear students: the bar information session with Georgia bar officials that was scheduled for Monday, March 16, is cancelled due to university-wide changes because of COVID-19 (more information HERE). We are in the process of revising our planned Spring semester bar readiness programming for delivery online; we will provide details as soon as we can. Please make sure to read the weekly On The Docket, which will resume on Monday, March 16, and all Emory emails.

Meanwhile, if you are graduating in May and plan to take a bar exam in July 2020, you can make great use of this extra week of spring break to get ahead on your individual bar readiness. Please remember that getting or keeping job opportunities in the legal profession depends on your taking and passing the bar exam as soon as possible after graduation, so everything you can do right now to focus on bar readiness, including using the extra week out of class, will directly improve your options and your chances for success.

If you don’t already have a copy of the book “Pass The Bar!“, I highly recommend it. Although it was published before some changes to the MBE, it is still the most useful single-volume guide I have found to supplement your commercial bar review course. It has “action checklists” for different timeframes leading up to the exam itself; Checklists 1 and 2 are now relevant to the July bar. The biggest changes in the MBE, not reflected in the book, are the addition of Civil Procedure to the MBE subjects and the increase in the number of experimental questions to 25. Otherwise, the advice in the book is very sound.

If your commercial bar review course is making “early start” materials available by now, I strongly advise you to work on those during the extra break. If you haven’t yet signed up for a bar review course, you should do that right away, even if you’re not sure what state you’ll work in after you graduate. Most courses will let you switch states if you need to. Remember that more than half of all state jurisdictions now use the Uniform Bar Exam (UBE) which gives you a portable score. For details, go to www.ncbex.org, where you can find general and jurisdiction-specific information.

Stay well, and stay tuned for more information about this spring’s bar readiness programming!

Info Session on the Bar Exam

Come find out everything you always wanted to know about the bar exam but might have been afraid to ask! (Don’t be afraid — be informed!). On Monday, March 16, 2020, the Director of Bar Admissions for the State Bar of Georgia and one of the Bar Examiners (the people who write and grade bar essay questions) will visit Emory Law to give an overview of the bar exam and answer students’ questions. Much of the information will be relevant to jurisdictions other than Georgia. Join the Office of Academic Engagement & Student Success from 12:15-1:45 pm in Rm. 1E, on March 16. Reminders will be in On The Docket.

Remember also to keep track of deadlines for the jurisdiction wherever you plan to take the bar; always check directly on that jurisdiction’s own official bar admissions website. You can get to that through the website of the National Conference of Bar Examiners.

Pizza will be served during the March 16 info session; feel free to bring your beverages and your questions!

Bar Readiness; Or, What I Did Over My Winter Break

Dear Class of 2020: Congratulations on finishing the fall semester! As you look ahead to the rest of your time here, you will have much to celebrate even before graduation. Don’t forget to use this time also to make sure you are ready to make the most out of your commercial bar review course after graduation. There is much you can and should do NOW to improve your bar readiness and your chances of first-time success on the bar exam in July!

First, check to make sure you are aware and on top of all bar-related deadlines and requirements for the bar exam in the state where you plan to take it.  Each state has its own rules and processes, even if they use some of the same tests, and the state bar admissions offices put the burden on you to know, understand, and follow their particular requirements. A good place to start is www.ncbex.org, the website of the National Conference of Bar Examiners, but always check directly on the state bar’s own website in case of any changes. You will also find on the state bar’s website information about the subjects that state can test, what kind of performance test it may give, whether there is an additional component that you take separately from the bar exam (e.g., the MPRE, or the online New York law course), and even past essay questions and sample answers. If you plan to seek exam accommodations, start that process now, it can take a long time.

Second, I highly recommend the book “Pass The Bar!” by Riebe and Schwartz. Although it was published before a few changes in the MBE, so you have to update the information about what subjects are tested and how many questions are experimental, for instance, it remains the best comprehensive guide and planning tool I have found, including especially its “Action Plan Checklists.” Also, subscribe to or come back to check out our blog, “Emory Law Bar Readiness” (link is on the Office of Academic Engagement pages on the law school website, www.law.emory.edu); it contains a lot of useful information as well as links to additional resources.

Third, now is the time to confirm your choice of a commercial bar review course, if you haven’t done that already. You should have that in place by the end of your fall semester. This will allow you to start getting familiar with the course materials and figuring out where your individual weaknesses might be, with plenty of time to remedy any gaps in your recall or understanding of bar-tested subjects. You can add bar-tested subjects to your schedule during the drop/add period in the first week of classes in January, if you think that’s necessary.

Fourth, start NOW to plan ahead for your post-graduation study period. Assess your own readiness in a systematic way, and plan to take the MBE diagnostic tests and overview workshops we will offer in the spring semester.  Assess candidly whether you have any particular risk factors (a chart of risks and how to remedy them is available outside the Office of Academic Engagement). Plan how you will use the time between now and July to address those. Make a plan to handle your time, finances, and other needs during the bar study period (May through end of July).

We look forward to working with you on your readiness to take and conquer the bar exam next summer! Best wishes for your holiday season – Dean Brokaw

Change in Process to Apply for Accommodations on the MPRE

The National Conference of Bar Examiners has announced the following change to its process for approving accommodation requests on the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam (“MPRE”):

IMPORTANT: The process for requesting MPRE test accommodations is changing. Beginning with the March 2020 MPRE, candidates must apply for accommodations prior to registering and scheduling a test appointment. A detailed explanation of the application process is provided below; please read it carefully. NCBE is now accepting requests for accommodations for 2020 administrations of the MPRE.

Details are on the website of the National Conference of Bar Examiners. As a reminder, requests for ADA-related accommodations on the bar exam itself, as distinct from the MPRE, are reviewed and decided separately by each jurisdiction. Applicants should read the relevant portion of the state bar admissions website for the jurisdiction where they plan to take the bar exam, well in advance, as it can take a long time to collect all the required documentation. All of those websites can be reached through the website of the National Conference of Bar Examiners, www.ncbex.org.

Reminder: State Bar visit this week

We will be offering a number of bar readiness programs for graduating students, and the first will be on Wednesday, Sept. 18, from 12:15-1:45 pm, when the Director of Bar Admissions for the State Bar of Georgia will come in person to explain the character and fitness application process. Details are in On The Docket and in flyers on the electronic bulletin boards. In Georgia, you do this in your fall semester; each state has its own deadlines, which you must look up and enter into your planners. You can start here: Comprehensive Guide to State Bar Requirements. For example, the deadline to register for the November MPRE is this week, and the test is transitioning from paper to computer; you must go to www.ncbex.org for specific information about the MPRE.

If you haven’t yet read at least some of the book “Pass the Bar!”, discussed in my June email, I highly recommend it; the planning guide/timeline I sent all graduating students via email is based in part on the action checklists in that book. They start at the beginning of your last year of law school, i.e. now if you plan to graduate in May and take a bar exam in July.

The information presented this week by Georgia bar officials will be relevant to other states also, since most character and fitness reviews by bar admissions staff and committees involve similar concerns, so don’t miss this unique opportunity to hear directly from top bar officials. Pizza will be available at Wednesday’s program but feel free to bring your own lunch if you wish. 

Guest Post on Bar Exam “Trigger Words”

Dr. Kirsten Schaetzel, a linguist and our Emory Law ESL specialist, has written this excellent advice that will help all bar-takers, not just those for whom English is not a native language. The bar exam will play tricks on you; awareness and practice will help:

“Pay attention to trigger words!

Bar questions, both multiple choice questions and essay questions, often contain words that may seem insignificant, but instead carry much legal meaning and usually have an impact on the answer you choose or the answer you write. We call these words “trigger” words because just like the trigger on a gun, these words have an impact! When you pull the trigger on a gun, a bullet shoots out; when a question contains a trigger word, it has an impact on the way you interpret a situation. Some bar questions may have more than one trigger word.

Trigger words concern time, place, and manner (the way something is done). These usually have a legal impact. Examples of triggers are:

  1. Adverbs, such as immediately, recklessly, accidentally, quickly, severely
  2. Negatives, such as not, does not, did not, and prefixes such as il- (illegal), im- (imperfect), in- (inhospitable), and un- (unconscious)
  3. Descriptive qualifiers, such as a person’s age, any physical limitations, gender, familial or business relationships
  4. Dates, distances, and times (may be clues to causation and statute of limitations)
  5. Place, such as country, state, county, city (may be clues to jurisdiction)

A few examples of trigger words in sample MBE multiple-choice questions are listed below (http://www.ncbex.org ):

  1. The man has “Beware of Dogs” signs clearly posted around a fenced-in yard . . .
  2. The neighbor was attached by one of the dogs and was severely
  3. A major issue is whether the train sounded its whistle before arriving at the crossing.
  4. A daughter was appointed guardian of her elderly father . . .
  5. The sales agreement did not mention the shutters, the buyer did not inquire about them, and the buyer did not conduct a walk-through inspection of the home before the closing.

Notice the underlined “trigger” words and think about the impact they have on meaning.

As you read the prompts for multiple-choice questions and the fact-patterns for bar essay questions, keep your eyes open for trigger words and phrases!”

Thanks, Dr. Schaetzel! I recommend, in this final stretch of bar study, doing as many practice MBE questions as you can and use “active reading” by underlining or circling trigger words and other key words on the questions themselves. This will remind you to notice them on the real bar exam (and you should underline or circle them on the real questions too). Time will be tight — you can streamline your pace of answering questions by practicing now how to focus on the essentials.

Six Weeks to Go! A Plan, and Pets

Six weeks from today, most of you will be almost through your first day of the bar exam. Now is a great time to reassess your bar preparation plan and make any adjustments. If you haven’t yet established a productive daily routine, you should do that this week. You should treat bar study as a fulltime job if you aren’t working: getting up every morning at the time you will need to get up on the actual exam days, attending class (in person if that is an option, to reduce distractions), practicing good self-care, studying new material and reviewing older materials daily, keeping up with bar course assignments, and doing practice questions.

For most of this work, you should try to work in 60-90 minute blocs of time, then take a 5-10 minute break; human brains struggle to stay mentally focused for longer than 60-90 minutes at a time. Track your progress by using your bar course’s system to log your work; keeping up will help you stay motivated and on track. I recommend staying comfortably ahead of your cohort’s completion statistics, as those include people who have stopped studying and/or don’t plan to take the bar, so they pull down the averages.

Speaking of practice questions, some bar experts believe you should aim for doing AT LEAST 2000 practice MBE questions by the end of bar preparation. If you did the diagnostic workshops we held in February, you did 100 practice MBE questions in each workshop, and those count as long as you assessed your performance on them. Add up how many you’ve already done by now, and figure out how many more you need to do to reach 2000 by the weekend before the bar, then divide that up by how many days you have left and assign yourself that number to do every day, using all the resources of your commercial bar course and other supplements you may have. If your course offers spaced-repetition exercises or practice questions, that is an effective learning technique.

Profs. Riebe and Schwarz recommend doing MBE practice questions in sets of 34 per session, as that is how many you should ultimately be able to do in one hour on the real exam (100 questions per 3-hour session, morning and afternoon). One approach when you’re practicing is to start by seeing how long it takes you to finish 34 with a high level of accuracy; it will likely be more than one hour! Work on balancing accuracy, timing, and endurance, and develop a rhythm by daily practice. The goal is to work up to finishing 34 practice questions in one hour with a high percentage of correct answers. “High” is anything above 65-70%.

If you’re still reinforcing your knowledge of substantive law in some subjects, it’s fine to do your 34-question sets in one subject for now. After you do them, review both correct and incorrect answers to understand why each is right or wrong. As your recall and knowledge get stronger, you must shift toward doing mixed-subject practice sets. For instance, if you’re able to finish 34 practice questions in a single subject, in one hour, with 65% or more correct, you’re definitely ready for mixed question sets (you may be ready sooner). Don’t panic if your accuracy drops quite a bit when you go from single-subject sets to mixed-subject sets — it will! Pushing through that stage and persisting is where a lot of learning occurs. Keep doing the mixed sets, those are what you will see on the bar itself, and you WILL get better.

If you’ve persisted this far and you’re still reading, here is your reward: Happy Tails volunteers and their lovely dogs return to the law school tomorrow, Wednesday, June 19, to offer some puppy love and pet therapy. They’ll be in the Law Student Commons from 12:30-1:30 pm, so please join us! Doing something rewarding for yourself at the end of every productive day should also become part of your routine. You can do this!