Congratulations!

Congratulations to all Emory Law grads who took any state’s bar exam in July and who have been told you passed! Most of the results have now been released, including New York and Florida, and Georgia (today); we are very proud of you. It’s a big achievement and one that is not easy to accomplish, as you know after many months of study and weeks of review courses, plus thousands of practice questions. You’ve earned the right to pat yourselves on the back!

If you want to be sworn into the Georgia Bar with your classmates on November 14, at the annual ceremony hosted here by our alumni relations team, please RSVP at this link, where you will also find more details about the event: RSVP for Swearing-In Ceremony.

If you took the exam and did not pass this time, please feel free to contact me or Rhani Lott 10L if you’d like to talk about trying a different approach or using different materials, including the ones listed elsewhere on this blog. If you will be in Atlanta studying to re-take a bar exam in February, you are welcome to come back to study in the MacMillan Law Library and/or take part in any of our spring semester programming. We have faith in you, and we want to help you cross that finish line.

Best wishes to all of you!

Great Advice from the Class of 2018

Dear bar studiers: Happy Friday! Bethany Barclay-Adeniyi, who graduated last year, has kindly written down specifics of what helped her most to pass the Georgia bar exam in February. Bethany took BARBRI and supplemented the course as below. Here are her thoughts:

Below are a few things that really helped me during the bar prep process:

  1. Mental Focus, First and Foremost
    1. Without peace of mind, bar prep will go in vain. Without a stress-free environment that allows you to focus and retain information, bar prep will go in vain. Getting your mind in the right place, and keeping it there throughout the study process, is key to success. Whether it be prayer, exercising, or some other form of stress relief or means of staying encouraged, finding ways to stay motivated, at peace with yourself, and focused are key to bar prep success.
  2. Consistent MBE practice
    1. I tried to maintain 32 MBE practice questions per day. Given my work schedule, some days I could only get through 10 or 15 questions, and then I would make up for the remaining amounts on the weekend. When I took my leave from work solely to study, I upped my MBE practice to 50 questions per day – 1 set of 25 in the morning, and one in the afternoon.

                   (I realize this may be a large amount for students going through the BARBRI course for the first time, especially in the first month given the lectures can be time-consuming. I do wish, though, that I had incorporated more MBE questions in lieu of some of the BARBRI AMP questions. While helpful in learning the black letter law, AMP questions are simply not formatted like true MBE questions).

    1. Adaptibar helped me greatly as well. Not only did it help me break up the monotony of study days, but it allowed me to track which areas I consistently got questions wrong in so I could target those topics more. While a good way to “switch it up” and keep my brain engaged, there is no substitute for putting a pencil to paper and marking up actual questions, given this is what happens on exam day
    2. Reading the explanatory answers helped because they are structured like a well-written essay question (for the most part). So MBE practice helped in all areas of preparing for the exam because it helped me learn law that is potentially also tested on the essay portion of the exam.
  1. Prioritized mastering the GA essay topics based upon which were tested more frequently, but also making sure I did not neglect any one subject.
    1. It is key to prioritize which subjects are tested more frequently (in general), but I didn’t spend a ton of time tracking which essay questions had been tested each year, etc. I know some people get a little too caught up, in my opinion, with trying to predict which essay questions will be tested based upon previous statistics. I found it more helpful to not waste energy poring over what I thought would be tested, but rather spend time learning enough information about each subject so that I would be prepared to write a well-formulated essay no matter the topic.

                    i.      For example, I think Professor Freer’s BARBRI “go-by” he provides about how many times essay topics have been tested in previous years is enough to prioritize a study strategy for essay topics. I personally did not look at another source, and was able to divide my time efficiently between subjects.

    1. When practicing essays I also kept in mind that generally each fact was in an essay question for a reason. So even on exam day, I kept that thought in mind and the facts helped jog my memory about what legal concept was being tested.
  1. Practice, Practice, Practice
    1. Consistent practice of MBE questions, essays, and MPTs

                    i.      I didn’t neglect MPTs, and followed the “Pass the Bar!” book’s suggestion of doing 1 MPT per week, and 2 essays per week. Some weeks I did more depending on how secure I felt with my performance.

    1. Timed Performance: I started off doing a few essays and a MPT untimed. However, after that I did timed performance. I found timed performance to be invaluable because I was able to get a more accurate picture of the work product I can produce while under pressure/my MBE performance (exactly what will be happening on exam day).
    2. Sidenote: I broke out the MBE practice as its own section above because I think people underestimate the importance of the MBE in general. I also think I did not realize how important it is to practice those MBE questions religiously because, when I did, I started seeing patterns, common distractors, and my performance improved drastically. On exam day, I was in a rhythm when it came to MBE questions. It greatly helped, given you are also dealing with anxiety and nervousness on the day of the exam, to have my mind already trained and familiar with the rhythm and pace to take when doing MBE questions.
  1. Picture yourself succeeding
    1. As someone told me, and what I often got tired of hearing to be quite honest, was that bar prep is a marathon and not a sprint. While cliché, it is absolutely true! You have to pace yourself and take it one day at a time. Each day, it is important to imagine yourself succeeding, and picture yourself crushing that exam. I even went so far as to picture myself sitting in the exam room, sitting at a table while doing MBE questions, practice essays, or practice MPTs (for those who don’t know what the exam room looks like, a picture is online on the GA bar admissions website). Keeping my end goal in mind was key.

Thanks, Bethany, for sharing your words of advice and encouragement!

 

Congratulations to all February Bar-Passers!

Congratulations to all Emory Law grads who took and passed any state’s bar exam in February! Most of the results have now been released; we are very proud of you. It’s a big achievement and one that is not easy to accomplish, as you know after many months of study and weeks of review courses, plus thousands of practice questions. You’ve earned the right to pat yourselves on the back!

If you took the exam and did not pass this time, please feel free to contact me or Jennie Geada Fernandez if you’d like to talk about trying a different approach or using different materials, including the ones listed elsewhere on this blog. If you will be in or near Atlanta this summer, studying to re-take a bar exam, you are welcome to come back to study in the MacMillan Law Library or take part in some of the study breaks we’ll be offering (most will be on Wednesdays around lunchtime). We have faith in you, and we want to help you cross that finish line.

Best wishes to all of you.

Congratulations!! And a Georgia invitation

Dear Class of 2018: If you recently learned that you passed the bar exam, congratulations! All your effort and hard work paid off!

If you have passed both the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) and the Georgia Bar exam, you are now eligible for admission to the State Bar of Georgia. By now, you should have gotten the following invitation from Emory Law:

Your Emory Law Community would be honored to facilitate your admission to the Georgia Bar with a special Swearing-In Ceremony & Reception at Emory Law in Tull Auditorium on Thursday, November 15, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. Judge Courtney L. Johnson 00L will preside. All your friends and family are invited!

Arrive by 5:45 p.m. We will begin promptly at 6:00 p.m. and the entire event should conclude by 8:00 p.m., including time to process and sign the certificates following the ceremony.

To participate in the Swearing-In Ceremony & Reception, you must complete the following:

1) Register yourself and your guests.

2) Submit your original Certificate of Eligibility by end of business day on Thursday, November 8, 2018. Delivery instructions below. You received this certificate with the notification of your Georgia Bar passage, and possession of the original document (not a copy) is the only method by which the Clerk of Court may process your admission. Please note: Your certificate will be mailed to the most recent address on file with the Georgia Bar. Please confirm your address with the Georgia Bar to ensure accurate delivery.

Please hand-deliver your certificate to the wooden lockbox outside of Dean Brokaw’s office (G131) in Gambrell Hall or mail it via registered delivery (FedEx, UPS, USPS, etc.) to:

Genude Gregoire, Assistant Director of Alumni Engagement

Emory University School of Law

1301 Clifton Road

Atlanta, GA 30322

MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN END OF BUSINESS DAY ON

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2017

If you have any questions, please contact Genude Gregoire.

Once again, congratulations on this incredible milestone! We look forward to celebrating your accomplishment at 5:45 p.m. on Thursday, November 15!

Note: If you are being sworn in prior to this event, but would like to join your classmates as a ceremonial participant, please let us know by emailing me here: Genude Gregoire.

We are so proud of you, and we look forward to seeing many of you here on November 15! Do remember to register yourself and your guests.

Warm regards — all of us here at Emory Law!

You Took the Mock MBE — Now What?

Many of you took your bar review course’s simulated MBE last week, and many of you may have been disappointed in your results. Now is the time to put on a final, focused effort to make sure you get the scores you need to pass! Even if you were pleased with your simulated MBE score, now is NOT the time to relax. Four weeks from today, you will be in the bar exam for real. If you keep up the good work and continue your diligent, targeted strategies to improve your own performance, there is no reason why you cannot achieve success! Here is some great advice from the Law School Academic Support blog:

The key is to use the feedback to improve.  I highly encourage everyone to sit down with the Academic Support or Bar Support person at your law school.  Bring the score analysis from your bar review company.  Create an improvement plan for July.  You can absolutely improve 20 questions by getting 3 more questions correct in each subject.  Everyone can learn enough law for 3 questions per subject.

Efficient studying in July gets the 3 extra questions per subject.  Most of June focused on the MBE, so much of July will be spent on essays.  Most students worry about how to find time to improve.  I agree that no one has time to add in an extra 2-3 hours memorizing outlines for each MBE subject, but you don’t need to.  My biggest suggestion is to spend 10-15 minutes at the end of the night on the most important sub-topics.  Use the score report to identify 1-2 small topics you struggled on that are highly tested in each MBE subject (ie – hearsay, duty of care, etc.).  Spend 10-15 minutes right before bed looking at flashcards, an outline, or even practice questions on only that sub-topic.  Switch subjects every day between now and the bar.  The focused study on only areas needing improvement will help gain the couple questions per subject.  Focused studying is the key in July.

If you’d like to meet with me or Jennie next week to discuss your simulated MBE score, we will be happy to talk over strategies you can use in the next four weeks. If you have the book “Pass the Bar!”, remember to review their action checklist that applies to this time period, it has great suggestions. Make sure to keep up with your course’s assigned work and keep your completion rate as high as you can — students who finish 75%, 80%, 85%, and more of their commercial courses have the highest odds of success (above 90%), and the more you do, the better your odds. If you have to choose which assignments to complete and not do others, I recommend focusing on practice questions in all areas of the bar: MBE, MPT, and essays. Enjoy your Fourth of July — but keep studying. With that effort and focus, you can make sure this is the last Fourth you have to spend studying for a bar exam — because you will pass it this summer! Keep calm and carry on.

Congratulations to our February bar takers!

I just received the results for the February bar exam in Georgia, following results we already had from a number of other states. Congratulations to all who passed! We are very proud of you. We know you are glad to be finished, whether this was your first bar exam, or a repeat attempt, or you were taking an additional bar to get admitted in another state. We wish you a happy, pleasant, and restful weekend!

Wishing our bar-takers the best!

Georgia bar results from the July 2017 bar exam should be out this Friday, October 27; New York results may be out that day too, or the next week (it can change from year to year) (UPDATE: New York bar results were emailed to test-takers late last night, 10/23). Other states’ results have been coming in a few at a time this month. Our fingers and toes are crossed that all Emory Law grads achieve success! If you passed, CONGRATULATIONS!  All your hard work and effort paid off! If you did not pass, please don’t despair. Now you know what it looks like and feels like to take a bar exam, and what you may need to focus on more for success on your second attempt. Unless there is some other complicating factor like personal illness or crisis, most of our grads who have to take it again pass the second time. The Anxious Lawyer website has some excellent advice. I’ll be happy to suggest resources to anyone who will be taking the bar again, including some that are available to alumni in our law library.

In the meantime, whether you get/got good news or bad, please remember that your worth as a person does not ride on the outcome of the exam, important as it is. I hope you will all remember that about each other, too. I hope you will be kind to each other, and support each other toward your goals even if one of you stumbles occasionally. If you know a classmate didn’t pass, don’t avoid that person. He or she already feels terrible. It’s not rubbing it in if you express empathy and offer to meet over coffee or a beer. And maybe you have some resources to share, to help your classmate over the finish line.

One helped the other over finish line

 

 

We’re proud of all of you and the effort you invested in years of law school and months of bar preparation! We’re looking forward to seeing many of you at the Georgia bar swearing-in ceremony for Emory Law grads on November 16, in Tull Auditorium. The link for registration is here: http://bit.ly/2017swearingin – the event will last from 6-7:30 pm. You made it! See you soon!

 

You Made It!

By the time you read this post, if you took a bar exam this week, you will be done. Wow. I know most of you are just heaving a sigh of relief that it’s over. Now begins the long wait for results, which don’t come out until the fall: in Georgia, the end of October. What can you do in the meantime?

Well, you can’t do anything more about the bar exam for now. You’ve given it your very best shot, and you have earned a break. Here is some excellent guidance from the Law School Academic Support blog: Congratulations To You (and a few tips while waiting for results). As Prof. Johns writes, many well-meaning people will tell you to relax, you’ve passed. And it may not feel that way to you. I suggest that you take the first part of their advice: relax. Don’t ruminate. Get LOTS of sleep and lots of time with friends, family, loved ones. Do some of those summer things you’ve been putting off, whatever they are: vacation, staycation, new book, old hobby, etc.

We’re proud of all the hard work you did to get to this point. Have a GREAT weekend!

Good luck on the MPRE this Saturday!

If you are taking the MPRE on Saturday, March 18, we wish you the best of luck and success! Please note: you CAN take the Georgia bar exam before you take the MPRE but you MUST take the MPRE and achieve the cut-off score on that, in addition to passing the bar exam, before you will be admitted to practice in Georgia. After this Saturday’s administration (for which all registration deadlines have passed), the next MPRE administration will be on Saturday, August 12, 2017. The regular registration deadline for that is June 22; the late registration deadline, which doubles the fee, is June 29.

The August MPRE is the last date that will likely allow you to receive those results by the end of October, when you should also get your results from the actual bar exam. If you plan to be sworn in to the Georgia bar this fall, and you have not yet taken the MPRE or achieved the required score, make sure you know those dates and register in time for August.

If you don’t have it already, now is a great time to buy yourself a copy of “Pass The Bar!” by Riebe and Schwartz, so you can refer to their terrific action plan checklists for readiness before you start your commercial bar review course.

Bar Results

If you took any state’s bar exam in July 2016, you likely have your results by now. Most of you are thrilled and relieved; some of you are not. Let me share some wise words and advice from Scott Johns, a law teacher who posted this on the Law School Academic Support Blog :

First, if you passed the bar exam, congratulations!  What a wonderful accomplishment!  As you celebrate your success while waiting to take your oath of office, here’s a quick suggestion.  This a great time to reach out to your support team (family, friends, colleagues, mentors, etc.) and personally thank them for their encouragement and inspiration.  And, with respect to your law school colleagues that did not pass, its important that you reach out to them too.  Send a quick email.  Invite them for coffee.  Let them know that you personally stand behind them and for them no matter what.  Most importantly, just listen with kindness, graciousness, and compassion.  In short, be a friend.

Second, if you did not pass the bar exam, please know that the results are not a reflection of who you are as a person….period.  Lots of famous and successful people did not pass the bar exam on the first try (and some after a number of tries).  Yet, they are some of the most outstanding attorneys and successful leaders.  So, be kind to yourself.  Take time to reflect, cry, and ponder.   Most importantly, just be yourself.  Then, in a few days or a few weeks, reach out to your law school.  Make sure you order your exam answers if they are available in your state because looking at your exam answers can give you inside information on what you did that was great and where to improve too.  Contact your bar review company for a one-on-one chat.  Overall, though, the most important task at hand is to be kind to yourself, and please remember, your value comes from who you are and not from the bar exam at all.  Period.

We are proud of all of you for undertaking something as challenging and exhausting as preparing for a bar exam. We will be offering resources to those who did not pass, but feel free to contact us yourself for support, whether in bar passage, employment or a fellowship. To the advice above, I would add that you should absolutely get as much information about your own answers as you can from your bar jurisdiction; make sure you know the deadline for making that request. In New York, for instance, it is 60 days after the date of notification that you did not pass.  Also, in most jurisdictions, you can request hand-scoring of your MBE answer sheet if you think that would make a difference. Contact your state bar jurisdiction for instructions on how to do that, as each of them has different rules. In Georgia, the process is:

Send a request in writing to the Office of Bar Admissions containing:

Your Name/Address/Phone Number/Email and Applicant Number

Month/Year Bar Exam Taken

Signature

Include a money order made payable to the National Conference of Bar Examiners (NCBE):  $50

The address is:

Office of Bar Admissions — ATTN MBE Hand Score Request

244 Washington Street; Suite 440

Atlanta, GA  30334

If you passed the Georgia bar exam, you should have heard from our Alumni Relations team inviting you to join your classmates and members of the Emory Law community to be sworn in at a special ceremony hosted here at the law school next week. If you did not get that information, please contact Bethany Glass at bethany [dot] glass [at] emory [dot] edu. You must RSVP and bring the original of your Georgia Bar certificate to Rm. G120 in Gambrell Hall. We look forward to hearing from you or seeing you soon.

Featured image provided by Al Haidar.