A Seven-Week Action Checklist

By now, most of you have started the assignments in your bar review course. If you have NOT started yet, you need to start NOW. Seven weeks from tomorrow, most of you will be finished with the bar exam!

Success on the bar exam is less about aptitude and more about attitude — that is, it’s all about sweat equity. The more time and effort you invest in your own bar passage, the better your chances are. You have a lot of control in this process. You want to invest time and effort wisely and efficiently, so try to be thoughtful and intentional with your study plan.

Think about incorporating these steps into your course’s study plan, in addition to making sure you “attend” bar classes daily, do the assignments on time and keep up with them, review material covered in class daily, and do plenty of practice questions. Profs. Riebe and Schwartz strongly advise doing about 34 practice MBE questions every day; 2 essay questions per week (from the MEE or your bar jurisdiction’s website); and one MPT question every week. You should make sure that the work you are doing for your commercial course, plus what you add to that, total those numbers daily and weekly.

If you want to practice with actual released MBE, MEE and MPT questions written by the National Conference of Bar Examiners, remember that Emory Law has paid for all graduating students in the class of 2021 to have free access to the full suite of NCBE study and practice materials. Details were sent to you via Emory email, so please check your inbox if you didn’t keep the instructions; or you will also find them on The Fourth Floor page of Emory’s Canvas system, under Bar Readiness.  If you set up your account for the study aids this spring, you should be able to log in at https://studyaids.ncbex.org, on any device. Your names were provided to NCBE as part of our institutional subscription; if you have any difficulty with the study aids, please contact NCBE.

To make sure you will succeed and pass on your first try, the next weeks are crucial and doing practice questions is an important key to success. One analysis some years ago showed that students who did 2000 practice MBE questions scored 13 percent higher on the MBE. That can mean the difference between passing and not, so why leave it to chance?

Similarly, practicing with essay and MPT questions (actually writing and submitting answers to your bar review company in time to get meaningful feedback) is very valuable. No amount of watching videos, reading the material, and even reading model answers can prepare you, or show you where you have gaps, as well as writing out your own answers and getting feedback in time to adjust and improve your approach. By practicing, you will also build up familiarity with the format and the look and feel of bar exam questions, which will reduce mental stress and allow you to engage more quickly and effectively with real bar exam questions. It’s a little like riding a bike; doing it over and over makes it more automatic each time you try.

You can still use the West Academic Assessment subscription also, to bolster your understanding of bar-tested subjects. Instructions for using the West materials are also posted on The Fourth Floor page of Canvas, and so is the Winter Break Study Plan sent to all graduating students in December to suggest specific ways you can use the West materials for bar preparation.

I recommend taking a scheduled 10-15 minute break after an hour of bar study, then switching topics. After your next break, you can go back to the first topic, but switching will probably help your brain process and retain what you’re learning more efficiently. Bar study is a full-time job, and you will give yourselves the best odds by working at it for 8-10 hours daily, so you’ll need those breaks! I also recommend sticking to a daily schedule that includes getting up as early as you will on the days of the exam itself, so your body and brain will adjust to being alert then; then take a break at the end of the day and do something for your wellbeing — a run or other exercise, or a walk with a friend, or a good meal. At this stage, I also recommend taking one weekend day off every week, if you are keeping up with assignments.

Your class has persisted through the worst global pandemic in a century. You can do this! The next seven weeks are in your capable hands.

Sign Up For A Bar Mentor!

If you’ve just graduated from Emory Law, congratulations! Most of you will have started your commercial bar review course by now. For some years, young alumni of Emory Law have volunteered to be “bar mentors” for individual new graduates of Emory Law who are studying for a July bar exam. Each graduate who wants a mentor is matched as closely as possible with a young alum (most have graduated in the preceding ten years) in terms of the state bar jurisdiction and House. The mentors are asked to stay in weekly contact with their mentees, to offer proven guidance at various stages of bar study, meet for coffee if feasible and if both parties want to do so, and generally be a sympathetic and knowledgeable resource for this year’s bar studiers.

Sign-ups for Emory Law’s Class of 2021 to request a bar mentor opened a week ago and are open through this Friday, 5/28. More details are on this flyer:

Bar Readiness, Remote Version

Welcome back to the Spring semester, Emory Law!  Even though we are not with you physically, we are still available and ready to assist you as you prepare for the bar exam.  Professor Rich Freer has recorded an introductory lecture regarding bar preparation, which you can view here. We have also rescheduled our series of MBE subject matter workshops (see schedule below). At these sessions, Rhani Lott 10L (with input from Dean Brokaw and the Dean’s Teaching Fellows) will walk you through the MBE’s scope of coverage as outlined by the National Conference of Bar Examiners. The sessions will be recorded, but we encourage you to take part live so you can ask questions.

Wednesday, April 1: 12:15pm

Wednesday, April 8: 6:30pm

Monday, April 13: 12:15pm

Wednesday, April 15: 6:30pm

We also encourage you to review the information here: Academic Engagement & Student Success: Bar Readiness; and to bookmark and subscribe to this blog, Emory Law Bar Readiness, so that you receive new bar-related blog posts. As always, go directly to the website of the jurisdiction where you plan to take the bar exam for specifics and deadlines. You can find a listing of those websites at www.ncbex.org.