Register Now To Take Georgia Bar Exam in February 2021

If you registered to take the Georgia Bar in July, September, or October 2020, and DID NOT SIT for the exam, but you plan to take it in February 2021, you must register anew and submit a new bar application (if you cleared character and fitness review before, you shouldn’t have to do that again, but CHECK your applicant portal).

If you haven’t applied to take the exam before, but you did clear the character and fitness review, remember to submit the second step, the application to take the exam itself. Check your applicant portal and the Office of Bar Admissions website for information and deadlines.

In both situations, regular registration for the February bar opened on November 10 and will close on January 6, 2021, at 4:00 pm. For details, go here: Georgia Office of Bar Admissions.

Character & Fitness Applications and Deadlines; Planning Ahead

As we’ve been discussing for a while, if you plan to take the July bar exam in Georgia, you must first complete and clear the “character and fitness” process. Regular applications for clearance are due in Georgia by 4 pm on December 2; details are here:  Certification of Fitness.

The Director of Bar Admissions, Ms. Heidi Faenza, held her usual annual meeting about this process with Emory Law students on September 9, on Zoom; it was recorded and Emory Law students can watch it here: September 9, 2020 meeting. You can also reach it via The Fourth Floor on Canvas.

The information will be helpful even if you plan to take the bar in another state, as character and fitness review processes mostly seek the same kinds of information. You can start gathering the information you will need (past employers, addresses, etc.) now. It takes longer than you think it will!

If you plan to take the bar in a different state, each state’s rules and deadlines are different. Look up yours at www.ncbex.org, the website of the National Conference of Bar Examiners, where you will find links to each state’s bar jurisdiction website as well as information about registering for the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam (“MPRE”) which most states require in addition to their bar exam. Remember that the only official information about a jurisdiction’s rules and deadlines comes from the jurisdiction itself; always check the official bar admissions website to make sure any information you’ve gotten elsewhere is accurate and up-to-date.

I recommend, again, that you read the book “Pass the Bar!”, by Profs. Riebe and Schwartz, between now and the start of classes. It includes really helpful “action plan checklists” that start with the period 6-12 months before your commercial bar review course starts, which is now if you plan to start such a course in May 2021, for the July 2021 bar exam. The book was written before some of the changes in the MBE in recent years (e.g., it says there are 6 MBE subjects and there are now 7), and it doesn’t address any pandemic-related changes made in 2020, but in every other respect, it is one of the best independent guides to passing the bar on your first attempt that I know, and a great supplement to the guidance you’ll get from your commercial bar review course (which I hope you’ve chosen and enrolled in by now).

The book walks you through the many things you can do, throughout your 3L year, to improve your odds on the bar exam. Every one of you can pass the bar first time, but it takes advance planning and this will help. It also discusses individual risk factors any student might have, that could affect that student’s bar passage; others are described here: Bar Exam Risk Factors. Specific solutions to address each of those are listed in “Pass The Bar!”; if you feel any of them apply to you, please schedule an individual advising appointment with one of the OAESS team.

You Got This!

One week from now, your 2020 remote bar exam ordeal will be over in Georgia and in most states. Remember to double-check the instructions you have from your bar jurisdiction, including the deadline to download the exam files (10/1 at 4pm for Georgia). You’re in the last stretch of this marathon. You can do this. You can pass the bar. You don’t have to ace it, just pass it. Your law school is rooting for you and we wish you the very best.

 

Some Tips for The Last Weeks before the October Bar

No matter what state’s bar exam you will take in October, it is essential that you complete as much as possible of your commercial bar review course before then. For example, the average completion percentage of BARBRI’s successful bar-takers last summer, July 2019, was about 82%. We advise trying to do more. We also advise that bar-takers aim at having done a total of about 2000 practice MBE questions by the time you take the real thing (that includes all practice questions you’ve done since beginning your bar study). Use the tools your bar course provides to calculate how much time you need to budget daily to finish your work, including — VERY IMPORTANT! — taking the simulated MBE if you haven’t done that yet. And just as important as taking it, you must assess your own performance on it so you can target any subject areas of weakness between now and October 5.

Here’s the recorded Zoom session with Prof. Rich Freer and BARBRI’s Director of Legal Education, Jonathan Augustin, held on Sept. 23: MBE Strategies.

When you review your simulated MBE score, Profs. Riebe and Schwartz recommend analyzing WHY you got any particular answer wrong so you can plan how to do better. They identify four main categories of error: 1) reading comprehension (RC); 2) missed issue (MI); 3) error of law (EL); 4) applied law incorrectly (A). As you review your test results, jot down those letters by each one you got wrong, and identify which kind of error you make most often, then work on improving that skill.

Emory Law graduates, if you weren’t able to attend last week’s session on how to tackle the Georgia essays, plus other tips on the MPT and what you can do to reach peak bar readiness over the next few weeks, that session was recorded and you will find it on Zoom here: Georgia Bar Essays and Other Tips for Readiness. The Powerpoint used during that session is here: 

If you missed last week’s separate session with Georgia’s Director of Bar Admissions, that was also recorded and the recording is available on Zoom: Information about the October 2020 Georgia Bar Exam.

Check communications from the Georgia bar or your bar jurisdiction as to whether you will now be allowed to use any scratch paper during the MPT, as that was a recent change option, but not all states have changed their restrictions.

If this feels like a heavy lift after the long months of delay, quarantine, rule changes, schedule changes, etc. — it is. But this exam is the last obstacle between you and the license to practice law that you’ve all worked so hard to achieve. You’re almost there! You can do this! We are all cheering you on!

Georgia Bar Publishes Details About October Exam

The Georgia Office of Bar Admissions has updated its FAQ section with more details and specific logistical requirements for the remote October bar exam: here. If you plan to take that exam, please review those very carefully, as a failure to comply strictly with all requirements could result in your being disqualified. You all have waited too long and endured too many changes to have that happen in the home stretch!

As set forth in the new FAQ and in an email you should have received from the Georgia Bar this week, laptop registration is now open. It will close on September 18 at 4 pm, so please don’t leave that until the last moment. There is other paperwork you must complete, so do read their email carefully, it has detailed instructions in addition to the FAQ posted. Both are essential for you to review.

The Office of Academic Engagement & Student Success will host a special review session for Emory’s Georgia bar-takers on September 10 at 4 pm, on Zoom, to discuss how to tackle the open-book Georgia law essay questions. Check your Emory email for details and a link.

Take good care of yourselves, the light is showing at the end of the tunnel. 

Georgia Supreme Court Replaces September Bar Exam With Online Exam in October

student with head down on desk

Chief Justice Harold D. Melton announced this afternoon that the Supreme Court of Georgia has canceled the in-person Georgia bar examination scheduled for Sept. 9-10 at the Georgia International Convention Center: https://www.gasupreme.us/online-bar-exam/. Due to public health concerns during this pandemic, and concerns specifically for bar-takers’ safety, an online exam will be administered Oct. 5-6 in its place.

Atlanta, July 20, 2020 – Chief Justice Harold D. Melton announced today that the Supreme Court of Georgia has canceled the in-person Georgia bar examination that was scheduled for Sept. 9-10 at the Georgia International Convention Center. Due to public health concerns during the pandemic, an online exam will be administered Oct. 5-6 in its
www.gasupreme.us

It is expected that the October exam will use most of the same materials from NCBE that other jurisdictions will use for online bar exams in October, but with Georgia law essays as usual instead of Multistate Essay Exam questions. All the subjects that were previously identified as eligible for testing are still potential subjects on the October exam, for the MBE, the MPT, and the Georgia law portions. Although the exam will still be given over two full days, the exam itself will be shortened.

If you were previously registered to take the September exam, our information is that the bar plans to roll over your registration, but make sure to follow all official instructions and announcements from the Office of Bar Admissions itself. If you had previously decided to wait until February 2021, but would now like to take it this October in the online format, it is likely you will get a chance to register for October, but that window may be brief, so keep checking the bar admissions website, below.

Details will be forthcoming at www.gabaradmissions.org. If you are already registered, look for further direct communications to you from the Georgia Office of Bar Admissions, which will also post answers to Frequently Asked Questions on that website later this week.

Georgia Bar Exam Delayed to September

The Supreme Court of Georgia announced today in a press release that the July 2020 bar exam in Georgia has been postponed to September 9 and 10, 2020, and that it will temporarily allow provisional admission to practice of law graduates within certain limitations: Supreme Court of Georgia Order. Georgia’s Office of Bar Admissions has posted a special FAQ page for questions about these new rules: GA Bar COVID-19 FAQ. Please read this new information carefully, as it has very specific details, together with the other bar examination information posted on the Bar Admissions website. If you are a current applicant to take the Georgia bar exam, make sure to check your applicant portal often for all communications.

It goes without saying that this is a rapidly changing situation, and bar jurisdictions are updating their decisions, deadlines and processes almost every day. The National Conference of Bar Examiners updates July 2020 Jurisdiction Information frequently; check that here. This blog will not cover all changes to all jurisdictions. Always check at www.ncbex.org and then at a specific bar jurisdiction’s official website for the most accurate, updated and authoritative information.

Good luck on this week’s bar exam!

If you are taking a February bar exam this week, we are rooting for you! I think our graduates overall could pick up some more points on the MPT, and possibly bridge the difference between passing and failing, so make sure you understand what it will ask you to do, and how it will be graded. If you want to look over examples of past MPTs and sample answers, you will find some here: Georgia Bar Past Questions and Sample Answers.

Make sure you review the rules, procedures and instructions for your jurisdiction’s bar exam. Georgia’s are here: Rules, Procedures and Instructions. Most of all, get a good night’s sleep tonight, stay hydrated, plan ahead for challenges like traffic and weather, and get to the test site early. The less stress you have on bar exam days, the better your chances are. Remember, each question is an opportunity to do well and score points; fight for every point, but forget about each question after you finish, and move on. Remind yourself why you know you can pass this exam! Good luck, wherever you are taking the bar– you can do this!

Congratulations!

Congratulations to all Emory Law grads who took any state’s bar exam in July and who have been told you passed! Most of the results have now been released, including New York and Florida, and Georgia (today); we are very proud of you. It’s a big achievement and one that is not easy to accomplish, as you know after many months of study and weeks of review courses, plus thousands of practice questions. You’ve earned the right to pat yourselves on the back!

If you want to be sworn into the Georgia Bar with your classmates on November 14, at the annual ceremony hosted here by our alumni relations team, please RSVP at this link, where you will also find more details about the event: RSVP for Swearing-In Ceremony.

If you took the exam and did not pass this time, please feel free to contact me or Rhani Lott 10L if you’d like to talk about trying a different approach or using different materials, including the ones listed elsewhere on this blog. If you will be in Atlanta studying to re-take a bar exam in February, you are welcome to come back to study in the MacMillan Law Library and/or take part in any of our spring semester programming. We have faith in you, and we want to help you cross that finish line.

Best wishes to all of you!

Reminder: State Bar visit this week

We will be offering a number of bar readiness programs for graduating students, and the first will be on Wednesday, Sept. 18, from 12:15-1:45 pm, when the Director of Bar Admissions for the State Bar of Georgia will come in person to explain the character and fitness application process. Details are in On The Docket and in flyers on the electronic bulletin boards. In Georgia, you do this in your fall semester; each state has its own deadlines, which you must look up and enter into your planners. You can start here: Comprehensive Guide to State Bar Requirements. For example, the deadline to register for the November MPRE is this week, and the test is transitioning from paper to computer; you must go to www.ncbex.org for specific information about the MPRE.

If you haven’t yet read at least some of the book “Pass the Bar!”, discussed in my June email, I highly recommend it; the planning guide/timeline I sent all graduating students via email is based in part on the action checklists in that book. They start at the beginning of your last year of law school, i.e. now if you plan to graduate in May and take a bar exam in July.

The information presented this week by Georgia bar officials will be relevant to other states also, since most character and fitness reviews by bar admissions staff and committees involve similar concerns, so don’t miss this unique opportunity to hear directly from top bar officials. Pizza will be available at Wednesday’s program but feel free to bring your own lunch if you wish.