Change in Process to Apply for Accommodations on the MPRE

The National Conference of Bar Examiners has announced the following change to its process for approving accommodation requests on the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam (“MPRE”):

IMPORTANT: The process for requesting MPRE test accommodations is changing. Beginning with the March 2020 MPRE, candidates must apply for accommodations prior to registering and scheduling a test appointment. A detailed explanation of the application process is provided below; please read it carefully. NCBE is now accepting requests for accommodations for 2020 administrations of the MPRE.

Details are on the website of the National Conference of Bar Examiners. As a reminder, requests for ADA-related accommodations on the bar exam itself, as distinct from the MPRE, are reviewed and decided separately by each jurisdiction. Applicants should read the relevant portion of the state bar admissions website for the jurisdiction where they plan to take the bar exam, well in advance, as it can take a long time to collect all the required documentation. All of those websites can be reached through the website of the National Conference of Bar Examiners, www.ncbex.org.

Reminder: State Bar visit this week

We will be offering a number of bar readiness programs for graduating students, and the first will be on Wednesday, Sept. 18, from 12:15-1:45 pm, when the Director of Bar Admissions for the State Bar of Georgia will come in person to explain the character and fitness application process. Details are in On The Docket and in flyers on the electronic bulletin boards. In Georgia, you do this in your fall semester; each state has its own deadlines, which you must look up and enter into your planners. You can start here: Comprehensive Guide to State Bar Requirements. For example, the deadline to register for the November MPRE is this week, and the test is transitioning from paper to computer; you must go to www.ncbex.org for specific information about the MPRE.

If you haven’t yet read at least some of the book “Pass the Bar!”, discussed in my June email, I highly recommend it; the planning guide/timeline I sent all graduating students via email is based in part on the action checklists in that book. They start at the beginning of your last year of law school, i.e. now if you plan to graduate in May and take a bar exam in July.

The information presented this week by Georgia bar officials will be relevant to other states also, since most character and fitness reviews by bar admissions staff and committees involve similar concerns, so don’t miss this unique opportunity to hear directly from top bar officials. Pizza will be available at Wednesday’s program but feel free to bring your own lunch if you wish. 

Happy New Year! Bar Readiness 2019

Welcome back to all Emory Law students, but a special welcome back to you who will be taking a bar exam soon! We have a busy schedule of programs every spring semester to help you get ready to get the most out of the commercial bar review courses you will likely take after graduation, so please look out for announcements in On The Docket and in flyers on the electronic bulletin boards. You can also subscribe to this blog to get an email when there is a new post.

We will kick off our annual spring semester series of in-house “bar readiness” programs in late January, but you should take some steps now, before our first program (which will be on January 28, at lunchtime). That will be a Q&A session with Jennie Geada Fernandez about the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam, or MPRE. We will then start a series of “MBE Overview” sessions, led by our own faculty, with Prof. Rich Freer walking you through the topics that can be tested under Civil Procedure, on 1/30, during the community hour. Save the dates! And watch On The Docket for details about location, etc.

1) Inform yourself about the requirements and testing for admission to the bar where you hope to be admitted. Every state has its own bar admissions rules and office, and you MUST comply with that state’s requirements. You can view them in detail at the website for the National Conference of Bar Examiners, www.ncbex.org. We strongly advise you to bookmark that site, as well as the official bar admissions site for your chosen jurisdiction. If there is any contradiction between the information provided, it is the state’s official bar admissions website and rules that will supersede any other guidance, so you need to read those carefully. NCBEX writes and scores tests such as the Multistate Bar Exam (“MBE”), the Multistate Performance Test (“MPT”), the Multistate Essay Exam (“MEE”), and the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam (“MPRE”). The last, the MPRE, is given three times a year, separately from the rest of the “bar exam.” Not all states administer all three standardized tests that are given together (the MBE, the MPT, and the MEE). For instance, the state of Georgia writes and grades its own state-specific essay questions, instead of the MEE. States that DO give all three standardized components are giving a “Uniform Bar Exam”, or UBE. You should educate yourself about that at the NCBEX website.

2) We recommend the book “Pass the Bar!” by Riebe and Schwartz. Although some of its information is out of date, such as the exact coverage and breakdown of the MBE, it remains one of the most useful bar readiness books available, since it includes action checklists and various charts to help you keep track of what you are doing to prepare, in addition to sensible, humane, time-tested advice for success on the bar exam. You can see a copy in the law library if you want to take a look at it before you decide whether to get your own copy.

3) The law school will provide at least two MBE Workshops this spring, at no added cost to you. The first one will be on February 9, from 10 am – 4 pm, and will be given by Kaplan. Watch On The Docket for more details and information about how to sign up. These workshops involve you doing a number of practice MBE questions, and then a professional bar lecturer explaining those questions and answers, and the strategies for doing well on the MBE.

4) If you haven’t yet signed up with a commercial bar review course, you should get that done before the end of this month. We don’t endorse any course over another and we suggest that you use the tools in “Pass the Bar!” to make an individual assessment as to which course is right for you. However, NOT taking a strong commercial bar review course is a known risk factor for failing the bar on the first attempt, and no one wants that to happen to you. Find the course you want, and sign up for it now! Most will offer you some “early start” materials, and working on those between now and May will likely reduce the time pressure and resulting stress you may feel during the intensive bar study period after graduation.

5) Plan a “bar vacation” for AFTER the bar exam! It’s fine to take a short week off after graduation before your commercial course class sessions start, but save the long vacations for August, after you’ve taken the bar. Your fulltime job between graduation and the end of July is to prepare for, take, and pass the bar exam. You’ll enjoy your vacation so much more once that is over!

Again, welcome back, and happy 2019! We look forward to helping you get ready for graduation and the bar exam.

Emory Law Commencement 2016 led by Professor Richard Freer, by Frank Chen.
Commencement 2016; photo by Frank Chen.

Good luck on the MPRE this Saturday!

If you are taking the MPRE on Saturday, March 18, we wish you the best of luck and success! Please note: you CAN take the Georgia bar exam before you take the MPRE but you MUST take the MPRE and achieve the cut-off score on that, in addition to passing the bar exam, before you will be admitted to practice in Georgia. After this Saturday’s administration (for which all registration deadlines have passed), the next MPRE administration will be on Saturday, August 12, 2017. The regular registration deadline for that is June 22; the late registration deadline, which doubles the fee, is June 29.

The August MPRE is the last date that will likely allow you to receive those results by the end of October, when you should also get your results from the actual bar exam. If you plan to be sworn in to the Georgia bar this fall, and you have not yet taken the MPRE or achieved the required score, make sure you know those dates and register in time for August.

If you don’t have it already, now is a great time to buy yourself a copy of “Pass The Bar!” by Riebe and Schwartz, so you can refer to their terrific action plan checklists for readiness before you start your commercial bar review course.

Deadline For Regular Registration for November MPRE is 9/15

If you are planning to take the MPRE in November 2016 (it is offered three times/year), the deadline for regular registration is this Thursday, September 15. Detailed information about how and when to register, fees, deadlines, etc. is on the National Conference of Bar Examiners website. From that website:

The Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) is a two-hour, 60-question multiple-choice examination developed by NCBE that is administered three times per year. It is required for admission to the bars of all but three U.S. jurisdictions (Maryland, Wisconsin, and Puerto Rico). (In addition, Connecticut and New Jersey accept successful completion of a law school course on professional responsibility in lieu of a passing score on the MPRE.) Because MPRE requirements vary from one jurisdiction to another, examinees are advised to check with the bar admission agency in the jurisdiction to which they seek admission before registering for the MPRE. Passing scores are established by each jurisdiction.

Remember that from now on, you will have various deadlines and requirements to meet for purposes of registering for, preparing for and taking a bar exam. It is your responsibility to research and keep up with those requirements, including by getting information directly from official sources. The only authoritative official source of information about the bar exam and bar admission in a given jurisdiction is that jurisdiction’s own Office of Bar Admissions or Board of Examiners website. Please make sure to bookmark the one for the state where you plan to take a bar exam, create an online account if that is available, and check both regularly. If you’re taking the November MPRE, good luck!

Subjects Tested on the Georgia Bar Exam

The Georgia bar exam is a two-day exam. Some parts are written by the National Conference of Bar Examiners; the essay questions are written and graded by members of the Georgia Board of Bar Examiners and their attorney assistants. For details on the Georgia bar exam dates, deadlines and logistics, visit their website: www.gabaradmissions.org.

Day 1: Two 90-minute Multistate Performance Test (MPT) questions in the morning and four 45-minute essay questions in the afternoon.

Day 2: Multistate Bar Exam (MBE), a 200-question, multiple choice exam.

SUBJECTS TESTED

MBE Subjects: Constitutional Law, Contracts/Sales, Criminal Law/Procedure, Evidence, Federal Civil Procedure, Real Property, Torts.

Georgia Essay Subjects: Business Organizations; Commercial Paper; Family Law; Federal Practice and Procedure; Georgia Practice and Procedure; Non-Monetary Remedies; Professional Ethics; Trusts, Wills and Estates; plus all MBE subjects. More than one subject may be tested in a single essay question.

Multistate Performance Test: Practical questions using a file of instructions, factual data, cases, statutes and other reference material supplied by bar examiners. Examinees are asked to draft a written work product, such as: a memorandum to a partner; a judicial opinion; contract provisions; a letter agreement; a letter of advice to a client, etc.

Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam: The MPRE is taken separately from the bar exam and it is offered in March, August and November. A scaled score of 75 on the MPRE is required for admission to the Georgia bar.

Are you taking the MPRE in March?

If you plan to take the MPRE (Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam) before graduation, it will be given next on March 19, 2016.  For more information, and to register, go to the website of the National Conference of Bar Examiners. The MPRE is required for bar admission in most American jurisdictions.

The MPRE is Saturday, November 7

As most graduating law students know, the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam (MPRE) is the standardized professional responsibility test required in most states, separate from the actual bar exam. It is offered three times/year, in November, March and August. It is one of the tests designed by the National Conference of Bar Examiners. For more information about it, including how and when to register for its next administration, plus some sample MPRE questions and other resources, go to www.ncbex.org. Most commercial bar review courses offer some free MPRE study materials; consult their websites for more information.