Practice for Success on the MBE!

Dear graduating students: Congratulations on entering your final semester of law school! Although this May will mark the end of your formal legal education for most of you, we know you are very aware that the biggest test is yet to come: the bar exam. We want to help you position yourselves for the best chance of success on it the first time, as there is much you can do between now and the end of July, in a less time-pressured way, to improve your odds of passing the bar first time.

 

First, some data. Our analysis of Emory Law’s bar passage rates over the last couple of years tells us that if you are an Emory JD student with a cumulative law school GPA below 3.2, regardless of LSAT or undergraduate GPA, you are at some risk of not passing the bar the first time you take it. If your Emory Law GPA is below 3.05, you are at higher risk of a poor outcome on the bar. Law school GPA is not the only risk factor an individual student might have; for more information, see the handouts outside Dean Brokaw’s office that have a chart of risk factors and how to address them.

Second, some solutions. The same chart suggests multiple ways to counter any risk factors you might have. One is that with early, diligent self-assessment and practice, you can improve your bar readiness well before you begin your commercial bar review course. A valuable first step is to take an MBE diagnostic exam and workshop. This year, the Office of Academic Engagement & Student Success is offering two such MBE workshops in February, as previously listed in On The Docket. The first one is this Saturday, February 9. If your Emory Law cumulative GPA suggests that you may be at risk, and you do not plan to take this first workshop, we strongly recommend that you register for the second one, which will be on Friday, February 22. Even if you will take the 2/9 workshop, sign up for 2/22 — you can take both! 

Dozens of your classmates have already registered, but there’s room for more of you. The registration link is in the email sent to all 3Ls and LLM students previously.

A number of Emory Law faculty will also present MBE overview sessions this semester, to introduce you generally to the topics and sub-topics that can appear on the MBE portion of the bar exam. The first MBE Overview session took place last week, with Prof. Rich Freer talking about the MBE generally as well as the Civil Procedure portion of that test. While we do not routinely record these sessions, Prof. Freer did allow us to record his, and the link to that recording can be found on this blog in a recent post. Upcoming confirmed dates for more MBE subjects are:

2/18 – Evidence with Prof. Shepherd in 1E from 12:15 – 1:45pm

2/20 – Contracts with Prof. Pinder in 1C from 12:15 – 1:45pm

2/27 – Constitutional Law with Prof. Fred Smith, 12:15 – 1:45 pm, room TBA (see upcoming On The Docket)

3/4 – Property with Prof Dinner in 1E from 12:15 – 1:45pm

Date pending confirmation: 3/6, details TBA. Save the date!

There are links to additional, useful, bar-related information on this blog. We suggest that you subscribe to it so you get an email whenever new information is posted. We look forward to helping you cross the finish line to start your new careers!

MBE Overview: Prof. Richard Freer

Emory Law Commencement 2016 led by Professor Richard Freer, by Frank Chen.

If you are a graduating Emory Law student and were unable to attend yesterday’s kick-off of our spring “MBE Overview” series, with Prof. Rich Freer talking about the bar and the MBE in general, and specifically about the topics that can be tested on the MBE under Civil Procedure, we are able to provide the recording several of you requested, thanks to gracious permission of Prof. Freer. The recording can be found HERE. Please note that this is a service provided for the use of Emory Law students and not to be distributed elsewhere.

Keep reading On The Docket and watching the electronic bulletin boards for announcement of future sessions in February and March!

Happy New Year! Bar Readiness 2019

Welcome back to all Emory Law students, but a special welcome back to you who will be taking a bar exam soon! We have a busy schedule of programs every spring semester to help you get ready to get the most out of the commercial bar review courses you will likely take after graduation, so please look out for announcements in On The Docket and in flyers on the electronic bulletin boards. You can also subscribe to this blog to get an email when there is a new post.

We will kick off our annual spring semester series of in-house “bar readiness” programs in late January, but you should take some steps now, before our first program (which will be on January 28, at lunchtime). That will be a Q&A session with Jennie Geada Fernandez about the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam, or MPRE. We will then start a series of “MBE Overview” sessions, led by our own faculty, with Prof. Rich Freer walking you through the topics that can be tested under Civil Procedure, on 1/30, during the community hour. Save the dates! And watch On The Docket for details about location, etc.

1) Inform yourself about the requirements and testing for admission to the bar where you hope to be admitted. Every state has its own bar admissions rules and office, and you MUST comply with that state’s requirements. You can view them in detail at the website for the National Conference of Bar Examiners, www.ncbex.org. We strongly advise you to bookmark that site, as well as the official bar admissions site for your chosen jurisdiction. If there is any contradiction between the information provided, it is the state’s official bar admissions website and rules that will supersede any other guidance, so you need to read those carefully. NCBEX writes and scores tests such as the Multistate Bar Exam (“MBE”), the Multistate Performance Test (“MPT”), the Multistate Essay Exam (“MEE”), and the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam (“MPRE”). The last, the MPRE, is given three times a year, separately from the rest of the “bar exam.” Not all states administer all three standardized tests that are given together (the MBE, the MPT, and the MEE). For instance, the state of Georgia writes and grades its own state-specific essay questions, instead of the MEE. States that DO give all three standardized components are giving a “Uniform Bar Exam”, or UBE. You should educate yourself about that at the NCBEX website.

2) We recommend the book “Pass the Bar!” by Riebe and Schwartz. Although some of its information is out of date, such as the exact coverage and breakdown of the MBE, it remains one of the most useful bar readiness books available, since it includes action checklists and various charts to help you keep track of what you are doing to prepare, in addition to sensible, humane, time-tested advice for success on the bar exam. You can see a copy in the law library if you want to take a look at it before you decide whether to get your own copy.

3) The law school will provide at least two MBE Workshops this spring, at no added cost to you. The first one will be on February 9, from 10 am – 4 pm, and will be given by Kaplan. Watch On The Docket for more details and information about how to sign up. These workshops involve you doing a number of practice MBE questions, and then a professional bar lecturer explaining those questions and answers, and the strategies for doing well on the MBE.

4) If you haven’t yet signed up with a commercial bar review course, you should get that done before the end of this month. We don’t endorse any course over another and we suggest that you use the tools in “Pass the Bar!” to make an individual assessment as to which course is right for you. However, NOT taking a strong commercial bar review course is a known risk factor for failing the bar on the first attempt, and no one wants that to happen to you. Find the course you want, and sign up for it now! Most will offer you some “early start” materials, and working on those between now and May will likely reduce the time pressure and resulting stress you may feel during the intensive bar study period after graduation.

5) Plan a “bar vacation” for AFTER the bar exam! It’s fine to take a short week off after graduation before your commercial course class sessions start, but save the long vacations for August, after you’ve taken the bar. Your fulltime job between graduation and the end of July is to prepare for, take, and pass the bar exam. You’ll enjoy your vacation so much more once that is over!

Again, welcome back, and happy 2019! We look forward to helping you get ready for graduation and the bar exam.

Emory Law Commencement 2016 led by Professor Richard Freer, by Frank Chen.
Commencement 2016; photo by Frank Chen.

Two Weeks to Go — Stay Engaged!

Two weeks from today, right now, you will have finished your first morning of the bar exam! And if you are taking the bar in Georgia, you will be eating the lunch that Emory Law provides at the bar exam site, with your classmates and a number of law school faculty and staff who will come to cheer you on.

But between then and now, you have thirteen days of study left. Remember that marathoners often say that it’s the last leg of the race that is the hardest, and studying for the bar is no exception. You may feel burned out by now, or at least disengaged. That is normal but — like a marathoner — you have to push through the fatigue and keep doing your best until you cross that finish line. Here are some suggestions that may help, based on good advice from Prof. Steven Foster:

  1. Take a break this weekend, at least a half-day completely off from bar study.  You need to take it so that your brain can digest all the studying you’ve been doing and catch up.
  2. Remember to study without distractions, and choose to do practice questions ahead of passively watching more video lectures or reading more outlines. “Multi-tasking” is a cruel myth when it comes to studying intensively and effectively — it doesn’t work. Put your phone on “do not disturb”, silence notifications on your laptop, shut yourself off from social media for prescribed periods of time, using an app like RescueTime or something similar. When you study, focus only on studying.
  3. Take a short, ten-minute study break every 45 minutes to an hour. Doing one thing for too long gets boring and retention decreases.  Get up, stretch, move around. When you resume studying, switch between study methods and/or subjects. The change will help your brain keep learning and retaining information. Use active study methods, such as handwriting your own flashcards and then using them, maybe even out loud.
  4. In these last weeks, focus on memorizing the law and practicing questions.  You will review each subject 2-3 times in the last couple of weeks before the exam.  Test your recollection of as much black-letter law as possible (flashcards or MBE practice questions), study to fill gaps in your memory, and then do practice essay questions, writing out some full answers. You can also do “half-practice” essay questions, i.e. practice your active reading skills on long essay questions and outline what your answer would be, even if you don’t write out a full answer for all questions.  You should do the same exercise as practice on some MPT questions. Keep drilling yourself with practice MBE questions to increase your score between now and the exam.  You want to peak on exam day, so continue to push improvement right up to the exam day.
  5. Last call to establish good sleep habits! If you have been staying up late to study, and getting up late in the morning, STOP! You will take this exam in the morning. You need to train your brain to be alert and ready to get to work in the morning by the same time you will start the bar exam. Start going to bed earlier and getting up at the same time you will have to get up on actual exam days, allowing for 7-8 hours of sleep per night.
  6. Finally, remember that you can do this! The bar exam is hard, but you have an Emory JD, which is a huge accomplishment.  Tell yourself every morning, “I will pass the bar in 2 weeks!”

If you own the book “Pass the Bar!” by Riebe and Schwartz, look at their “action checklist” for this stage of bar preparation; it has excellent suggestions too. Stay engaged — you’re almost there!

You Took the Mock MBE — Now What?

Many of you took your bar review course’s simulated MBE last week, and many of you may have been disappointed in your results. Now is the time to put on a final, focused effort to make sure you get the scores you need to pass! Even if you were pleased with your simulated MBE score, now is NOT the time to relax. Four weeks from today, you will be in the bar exam for real. If you keep up the good work and continue your diligent, targeted strategies to improve your own performance, there is no reason why you cannot achieve success! Here is some great advice from the Law School Academic Support blog:

The key is to use the feedback to improve.  I highly encourage everyone to sit down with the Academic Support or Bar Support person at your law school.  Bring the score analysis from your bar review company.  Create an improvement plan for July.  You can absolutely improve 20 questions by getting 3 more questions correct in each subject.  Everyone can learn enough law for 3 questions per subject.

Efficient studying in July gets the 3 extra questions per subject.  Most of June focused on the MBE, so much of July will be spent on essays.  Most students worry about how to find time to improve.  I agree that no one has time to add in an extra 2-3 hours memorizing outlines for each MBE subject, but you don’t need to.  My biggest suggestion is to spend 10-15 minutes at the end of the night on the most important sub-topics.  Use the score report to identify 1-2 small topics you struggled on that are highly tested in each MBE subject (ie – hearsay, duty of care, etc.).  Spend 10-15 minutes right before bed looking at flashcards, an outline, or even practice questions on only that sub-topic.  Switch subjects every day between now and the bar.  The focused study on only areas needing improvement will help gain the couple questions per subject.  Focused studying is the key in July.

If you’d like to meet with me or Jennie next week to discuss your simulated MBE score, we will be happy to talk over strategies you can use in the next four weeks. If you have the book “Pass the Bar!”, remember to review their action checklist that applies to this time period, it has great suggestions. Make sure to keep up with your course’s assigned work and keep your completion rate as high as you can — students who finish 75%, 80%, 85%, and more of their commercial courses have the highest odds of success (above 90%), and the more you do, the better your odds. If you have to choose which assignments to complete and not do others, I recommend focusing on practice questions in all areas of the bar: MBE, MPT, and essays. Enjoy your Fourth of July — but keep studying. With that effort and focus, you can make sure this is the last Fourth you have to spend studying for a bar exam — because you will pass it this summer! Keep calm and carry on.

Getting SeRiouS with Spaced Repetition; and a discount

If you are studying for the July bar, you know by now how much material you have to master and you have probably outlined a work calendar/schedule for the next eight weeks. (If you haven’t done that yet, now is a good time to do so).  Making the most effective use of your study time is crucial. A tool that may help is available now from www.SpacedRepetition.com, a start-up that has adapted “spaced repetition” technology to be used in studying for the bar exam, especially the MBE. Its founder is a law professor, Gabe Teninbaum, and you can read about the technology and its application here, SRS Info, and here: Top 20 Legal IT Innovations 2017.

The site uses a unique algorithm to help students learn far more in far less time. “An important focus for SpacedRepetition.com is helping law students succeed on the bar,” he says, adding that thousands of American law school graduates fail the exam every year. “But it can also be used by students and lawyers in other contexts to help them retain other legal knowledge. It has applications beyond law, too, but law is the current focus.” Combining psychological research and web technology, the system is built on a series of electronic flashcards. The core content, called the Boost Deck, is written by law professors. “A student spends about ten minutes a day studying them, and for each flashcard they see, they rate how well they know each one on a scale of 1 to 5,” explains Teninbaum…

Users are projected to improve their score by about eight points on the bar. This has dramatic potential, according to Teninbaum, because “between a third and half of people who fail the bar fail by less than that margin”.

Prof. Teninbaum is offering a 25% discount to all Emory Law grads who want to buy the basic “Boost Deck”, which normally costs $99 for a year’s access. Go to the SRS website, sign up (you can try it for 7 days for free) and use the discount code emory25 for 25% off. If you have to list a “referrer”, put Katherine Brokaw or try Emory or Emory Law. You can also follow Prof. Teninbaum on Twitter: @SpacedRep.

This system works best if you use it consistently and daily, but it takes very little time; you get automated reminders when you should do more review. It could be a refreshing change from your primary study methods. If you try it, let me know what you think!

Congratulations, Emory Law graduates! On to the bar exam!

Dear Emory Law graduates: first and foremost, CONGRATULATIONS! You made it! You earned the law degree in which you have invested so much effort, expense, and time. That is a wonderful achievement and I hope you take some time to savor it.

Second (of course), if you plan to use that degree to enter the legal profession, as the great majority of you do, you must take and pass the dreaded bar exam. Fear not! You can do it. But like your degree, it will require effort, some expense, and time. You don’t have to reinvent strategies for success on the bar exam, either. There are many excellent sources of guidance by people like academic support staff who have been coaching law students to succeed on the bar exam the first time they take it. And if you are taking a commercial bar review course, which we highly recommend (not taking one is a known risk factor for failing the bar first time), they will spend the next two months preparing you to pass.

Beware of bar-related advice from lawyers who are only drawing on their own anecdotal experiences with the bar exam. There have been a number of statistically significant changes to parts of the bar exam like the MBE in the last few years, so anyone who took it more than a year or two ago took an exam that may have been easier than the one you will face. Even excellent advice from knowledgeable sources must be viewed in light of those changes. For example, I often recommend Schwartz and Riebe’s book “Pass The Bar!”. It is an outstanding guide to first-time success on the bar exam and it includes action checklists for each stage of bar readiness. However, it was published before Civil Procedure was added to the Multistate Bar Exam (MBE). So do use it, but remember that it won’t discuss that subject being on the MBE.

Because of the changes to the MBE in recent years, my best advice is to aim for overshooting the passing score in your jurisdiction. Those who aim only to meet a passing score often fall short. It’s just not worth it! As long as you don’t exhaust yourself, there is no harm in doing more preparation than you may think you need. Again, beware of lawyers who tell you not to bother studying too much. It’s not the end of the world if you don’t pass first time, but it’s not a pleasant experience and not one we want any of you to undergo. It can mean the end of a job offer you hoped to get, so underpreparing is not worth the risk.

The good news for Emory Law grads is that there is really no reason you can’t pass first time, as long as you prepare diligently and make full use of the next two months. You are very capable students, and the bar exam is not an aptitude test — it is all about well-managed, diligent study and practice, which are completely within your own control. If you will be studying here in the Emory Law library and building, the Office of Academic Engagement & Student Success will be hosting regular study breaks for you starting the week of May 21. Specifically, we are hosting a study break/bar review kick-off on Monday, May 21, with King of Pops and the King of Civil Procedure, Prof. Rich Freer, at 1 pm. Watch your Emory email and Facebook pages for details from me, Jennie Geada Fernandez 02L, and Sei Yoshioka-Cefalo! We’ll be here all summer, so you are also welcome to drop by for encouragement and coffee.

We’ll be sharing information periodically on this blog between now and the bar exam itself. For example, here is some great bar-related guidance (and post-bar guidance) from lawyer Paula Edgar, CEO of a speaking, executive coaching and diversity consulting firm in New York: Bar Exam and Beyond: 11 Strategies for Law School Graduate Success.

Once again, we are VERY proud of you and all that you have achieved. We look forward to cheering you on, toward and across the bar exam finish line!

Bar Exam Risk Factors — and Solutions

If you plan to take a bar exam in the coming year, including this summer, you should take some time now to assess yourself and what risk factors you may have that could put you at risk of not passing the bar on your first try. That sounds scary, but 1) there are many ways to address those risk factors, many students have done that successfully to beat the odds; and 2) you have plenty of time between now and the summer to address any risk factors if you start now.

The book I recommend that all students read, ideally starting in the summer after their 2L year, is “Pass the Bar!” by Denise Riebe and Michael Hunter Schwartz. Here is a chart for self-assessment based on their list of risk factors and solutions:

Bar_Exam_Individual_Risk_Factors

Take a few minutes to read it over and ask yourself if any apply to you — they DO apply even to Emory Law students — then keep reading to find out how to neutralize them! Look for and attend our ongoing programs this semester that will help you ease into bar readiness. And feel free to visit with Dean Brokaw or Jennie Geada Fernandez to discuss how you can optimize your chances of success, starting with the MBE diagnostic exams and workshops we will hold starting this Saturday. If you are a graduating student, check your email or On The Docket for info and a registration link. The bar exam is not an aptitude test; it is an ATTITUDE test — you achieve success based on the effort you invest. Sweat equity. And that’s good news, because success is within reach of you all if you make the right choices. We’re here to help.

Nine Weeks …

Nine weeks from today, most of you will be done with the July bar exam! That’s hard to envision, since most of you also just started your bar review courses. Here are some pieces of good news, which I hope you will find encouraging:

  1. In nine weeks, this will be over. No, it won’t be the best summer of your life, but it will be over before August and you can still go to a beach, lake, or whatever destination fits your budget and your need to relax.
  2. You have NINE WHOLE WEEKS to focus on getting ready to pass the bar on your first attempt. If you manage your time well, keep up with your courses’ assignments, and treat bar preparation as a daily job, that is a good amount of time. Don’t let one of those workdays or weeks get away from you — it might feel good now, but it sure won’t later.
  3. You are a very bright student community and most of you WILL pass the first time — IF you put in the time, do the work, and do more than 1800 practice MBE questions. If you took one of our diagnostic MBE workshops this spring, those count toward your total! If you didn’t, you can still pick up the practice questions from all three workshop providers, outside G145.
  4. The bar exam is not an aptitude test; it’s all about “sweat equity”, and you control that. No matter how bright you are, if you don’t study enough, you are unlikely to pass. But even if you struggled academically in law school, you can still pass the bar first time by investing focused, daily effort in your preparation and doing up to 2000 practice MBE questions. This is within your control, unlike so many law school courses. Seize the moment and take that control!
  5. Slow and steady really does win this race. Don’t panic or freak yourself out — there’s no need, and it won’t help. Just plug away at your course assignments and practice questions, 6 days/week (you can and should take a day off weekly, if you are otherwise keeping up).

Check your Emory Law email for the list of support programs we are offering this summer on Wednesdays here on campus! We were glad to see many of you today for the first one — complete with celebrity cameo appearances by Prof. Rich Freer and Dean Schapiro. Whether or not you are here in Atlanta, know that we are here and we are rooting for you. Let us know how we can help.

Happy New Year! Bar Readiness in 2017

Will you graduate this May? Do you plan to take a bar exam this summer? If so, now is the best possible time for you to focus on getting ready to pass the bar the first time you take it, if you haven’t started already. Time after time, we see that the law students who start planning for the bar early in their 3L year have a much higher chance of passing the first time. In January, you have plenty of time to diagnose any weaknesses you might have and work over time to address them. Many law students have factors that put them at risk of not passing the bar first time — but virtually all of those factors can be readily addressed if given time and attention.

As we did last year, Emory Law is offering all our students who will graduate this spring the opportunity to gain some of those insights by taking an MBE diagnostic test of 100 practice questions with a follow-up workshop to discuss correct and incorrect answers, and the strategies to achieve your best scores. They will take place in January and February; the first one is on January 20. Students can sign up HERE for 1, 2 or all 3 of them! Last year, many students took all three and got great results on last summer’s bar exam. We are very happy to be able to offer the same opportunities again this year!