Important Bar Readiness/Advising Sessions in March; MBE Overview Information

Dear students: Welcome back from your break! We hope you enjoyed some rest and relaxation. Here is some important information about bar readiness programming in March.

  1. On March 20, the Office of Academic Engagement & Student Success will hold an open academic advising session for all rising 2Ls, rising 3Ls, and continuing LLM students, specifically focused on course selection and bar readiness. In addition to fulfilling graduation requirements, it is wise to choose a variety of courses, each of which serves at least one of the following purposes: (a) help you better define your potential interests, by narrowing the possibilities; (b) help you deepen your knowledge/skills/abilities in specific practice areas, if you know the possible careers you may choose to pursue; (c) help you signal to potential employers your knowledge of (and interest in) a particular area; (d) help you prepare for the bar exam by instructing you in one or more of the topics that are tested. Pre-registration and regular registration will take place in the first half of April, so come to this session on March 20, Rm. 1E, 12:15-1:45 pm. Graduation requirements are listed on the Law School Registrar webpage and in the online Student Handbook you will find there. You can review a course selection checklist for JD and AJD students here: Office of Academic Engagement & Student Success, under the tab for Choosing Courses.
  2. On March 27, the Office of Academic Engagement & Student Success will again welcome the Director of Bar Admissions for the State Bar of Georgia and a member of the Board of Bar Examiners for Georgia, to discuss what to expect on the bar exam itself. This session is well worth attending even if you plan to take the bar in a different state, as much of the information will cover national tests like the MBE and MPT, as well as other generally applicable information. This program is especially intended for students who plan to take the bar exam in July 2019, but others are also welcome to attend. March 27, Rm. 1E, 12:15-1:45 pm. A copy of the actual bar essay question the bar examiner will review with students is linked below; you should review it, outline how you would answer it, and bring those materials to the session.
  3. Due to a lack of faculty availability and student attendance, there will be no more MBE Overview sessions this spring. You may view the 2019 MBE Subject Matter Outline that is the basis for those sessions here, on the website for the National Conference of Bar ExaminersMBE Subject Matter Outline.  Rest assured that your commercial bar review courses will instruct you thoroughly in these topics. If you haven’t yet signed up with a bar course, you should do so right away, and start reviewing the “early start” materials most provide.

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Georgia Bar Exam BOWDEN JULY 2018 QUESTION

Bar Admissions/Bar Examiners 3-27-19

Steven Friedland on Bar Exam Readiness; Bar Examiners’ Visit on March 19

Prof. Steven Friedland, who has published books about bar readiness, has a great article in the current National Jurist: Using The “Four T’s” To Achieve Bar Exam Success. His advice is sound, especially what he says about staying actively engaged in your own learning process, and using active techniques to improve your learning and retention.

Spring break will be a great time to look again at “Pass The Bar!” by Riebe and Schwartz, and see where you stand in terms of their pre-bar checklists, and the bar exam risk factors and remedies they identify. The spring semester will accelerate rapidly once you all return from spring break, and graduation will be upon you faster than you expect (yay!) — then your commercial bar review courses. Please use time to your advantage now, identifying areas that may be a challenge for you on the bar exam so you can address them sooner and more thoroughly, with less pressure.

Please remember that the Director of Bar Admissions for Georgia and one of the Board of Bar Examiners, both alumni of Emory Law, will be at the law school on Monday, March 19, at 12:15 to 1:45 pm. Usually the Bar Examiner asks students to review a specific past essay question in advance, so watch for an email about that and check On The Docket for any other details. You can find past Georgia bar essay and MPT questions, and select answers, here: Georgia Bar Essays and MPT Questions. A light lunch will be served but feel free to bring your own.

Have a great spring break!

Bar Exam Essays: Just Do It (Them)

Here is excellent advice from the Law School Academic Support Blog, about doing practice essays questions now, as part of your preparation for the bar exam in one month. I strongly advise doing practice essay questions now, if you have not yet done any, and turning them in ASAP for feedback if your commercial bar review course offers that service. Students sometimes avoid doing practice essay questions because they fear them. Here’s the thing: if essay questions scare you now, how do you think they’ll make you feel on the real bar exam? The good news: if you tackle that fear now and don’t avoid doing practice essays, you will be much less intimidated when you have to answer the real thing. Your first attempts may not be very good. That’s okay, you have time to practice and get better. None of this is based on aptitude or intuition.

  1. Just do it. If you wait until you are fully comfortable with the law to write an essay; you will never do it. You will never be fully comfortable with all aspects of each and every subject area but you can get better by writing.
  2. Build your muscles. You must dive in to build tough skin when it comes to critique/feedback. When you are faced with the unknown you will develop a strategy. You do not want to face your worse fear, the essay, on the day of the exam.  It just won’t work. “Remember that no one shows up for a marathon without preparation so why should you?” (Dean of Student Engagement quote)
  3. Keep it real. Be completely honest with yourself and the people who are trying to help you.  Complete timed questions, honestly critique your responses,and start to do it closed book.
  4. Close the book…or you will never get the timing right and you will never memorize the rules.  Only after you have made a good faith attempt and done your best should you look up rules you do not know or understand.

Another word of advice for Georgia bar exam takers (and it may be relevant in other jurisdictions too): the exam will almost always include an essay question that raises issues of professional ethics. It will likely appear as part of a question on a different, bigger topic — because that is how ethical issues arise in the legal profession, they emerge when you are trying to handle a specific matter of law. On the February bar exam, which you can see online here, Essay Question 1 mostly concerned Evidence. However, one of the questions asked whether or not a prosecutor should turn over certain evidence to the defense. This is a specific scenario where the Georgia rules are slightly different. To do well on all of this essay, examinees needed first to know to discuss the rules governing professional conduct as well as evidence, and the Georgia distinctions.

February 2016 Bar Questions Are Online

Georgia’s Office of Bar Admissions has posted the February 2016 questions online here: Ga. February Bar Essays and MPTs. It is well worth your time to read through them so you have a better idea of what you will see on the actual bar exam. They have not yet posted sample answers for the February questions, but you can see sample answers for earlier bar exam essay questions and MPT questions going back as far as 2000. The New York Bar also has past questions and sample answers but the most recent ones they have posted are from July 2015.

No matter where you are taking the bar, make sure to look at the actual past bar exam questions that most jurisdictions make available. At this stage, you may not be ready to tackle them by doing practice answers but the more familiar you get with them by reading them over, the easier and more effective that practice will be when your bar course assigns you to do some (or you’re ready to do some on your own). Actually doing lots of practice MBE questions and writing out practice essay and MPT answers can mean the difference between passing first time and not. And make sure to think carefully about the “call” of each question; practice reading those closely, so you have more confidence that you know what the bar examiner actually wants to see in your response. Fight for every point!