Player Analytics Fundamentals: Part 1

Each Spring I teach courses on Sports Analytics.  These courses include both Marketing Analytics and On-Field Analytics.  The “Blog” has tended to focus on the Marketing of Fan side.  Moving forward, I think the balance is going to change a bit.  My plan is to re-balance the blog to include more of the on-field topics.

Last year I published a series of posts related to the fundamentals of sports analytics.  This material is relevant to both the marketing and the team performance sides of sports analytics.  This series featured comments on organizational design and decision theory.

This series is going to be a bit different than the team and player “analytics” that we see on the web.  Rather than present specific studies, I am going to begin with some fundamental principles and talk about a “general” approach to player analytics.  There is a lot of material on the web related to very specific sports analytics questions.  Analytics can be applied to baseball, football, soccer and every other sport.  And within each of these games there are countless questions to be addressed.

Rather than contribute to the littered landscape, I want to talk about how I approach sports analytics questions.  In some ways, this series is the blue print I use for thinking about sports analytics in the classroom.  My starting point is that I want to provide skills and insights that can be applied to any sport.  So we start with the fundamentals and we think a lot about how to structure problems.  I want to supply grounded general principles that can be applied to any player analytics problem.

So what’s the plan?  At a high level, sports analytics are about prediction.  We will start with a discussion about what we should be predicting.  This is a surprisingly complex issue.  From there we will talk a little bit about different statistical models.  This won’t be too bad, because I’m a firm believer in using the simplest possible models.  The second half of the series will focus on different types of prediction problems.  These will range from predicting booms and busts, to a look at how to do “comparables” in a better fashion.  In terms of the data, I think it will be a mix of football and the other kind of football.

 

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