Fanalytics Podcast: Mascots & Sports Team Names

In this Fanalytics podcast episode, we are doing a deep dive into mascots and team names in the sports world. Marketing Professor Mike Lewis, MBA student Al Multani-Kohal, and I kick off the episode by talking about a viral tweet.

A little background before getting to that…

Professor Lewis has been studying issues surrounding team names and mascots for several years.  This OpEd discusses the business case for changing a controversial team name such as the Washington Redskins.  A full series of posts focused on team names and mascots can be found here.

The topic of team names and mascots has since entered the classroom. Professor Lewis teaches a Sports Marketing class and recently gave an assignment where groups of students had to choose a sports brand that they believed could benefit from an updating.  Students were also asked to propose a solution to the potential branding “problem.”

Al’s group got caught up in a Twitter storm after they proposed changing the National Hockey League’s Nashville Predators to the Sabercats.

Al says his group looked at North American professional teams that could use rebranding because there wasn’t brand equity. This involved asking:

1.) Was there something that could be perceived as offensive?

2.) Was there a disconnect with how a logo/brand/mascot resonated with its origin stories?

Al says his team analyzed data on the word “predator” and found there were negative connotations associated with it. That’s how this proposal came to light.

In the second part of this episode, Mike and I talk about the history of mascots and some of the most famous brand mascots of all time including Mickey Mouse, Tony the Tiger, and Mario.

We also discuss a couple of controversial Native American mascots – the Cleveland Indians and Washington Redskins.

 

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Fanalytics Podcast: Super Bowl Advertisements

Goizueta Marketing Association’s Vice President of Career Services Nihar Thadani and Professor Mike Lewis do a live podcast on 2019 Super Bowl advertisements. They watch and analyze different advertisements to see what brands are trying to do.  For timing purposes, we have cut out the full version of advertisements being watched in the podcast.

Who are the winners and losers? Opinions are from Emory MBA students who answered a survey.

WINNERS:

  1. Stella Artois – Change Up The Usual
  2. Pepsi – More Than OK
  3. Bud Light – Game of Thrones

LOSERS:

  1. Mint Mobile – Chunky Style Milk
  2. Avocados From Mexico – Top Dog

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Fanalytics Podcast: Super Bowl History

Super Bowl LIII is right around the corner! With the big game being less than three weeks away, Mike and I wanted to talk about the history of the Super Bowl on this episode of the Fanalytics podcast. Talking about all 50+ Super Bowls would be a bit excessive so we picked the ones we felt were the most significant. Our goal was to see how much the Super Bowl has evolved and how it got to become the big sporting event it is today. Hope you enjoy!

Here’s some notes about the games we talked about.

1967 (AFL/NFL championship game):

  • The NFL champion Green Bay Packers defeated the AFL champion Kansas City Chiefs by 35–10
  • 51 million viewers – CBS and NBC two networks because it was the AFL/NFL championship game
  • Ticket pricing: $10 ($74.98 in 2018)
  • The halftime program was University of Arizona and Grambling State marching bands

1969 (Super Bowl 3):

  • First Super Bowl to be called by a number (Super Bowl III)
  • This championship proved the AFL was on par with the NFL for the very first time
  • New York Jets quarterback Joe Namath promised his team a victory – a guarantee that was obviously out of place, as the Colts were favored to win by as much as a 20-point margin
  • The Colts were unable to keep the game within one score, and the Jets took the title, 16-7
  • Ticket price: $12 ($83.15 in 2018)

1973 (Super Bowl 7):

  • Miami 14 – 7 Redskins
  • Miami was undefeated
  • Super Bowl ads did not become ‘famous’ until 1973 when Noxzema ran a commercial for their shaving cream featuring Joe Namath
  • Ticket price: $16 ($86.86 in 2018)
  • Halftime show: “Happiness Is.” with University of Michigan marching band and Woody Herman

1976 (Super Bowl 10):

  • Pittsburgh defeats Dallas 21-17
  • 1976 Up with People performs in Super Bowl X in Miami, FL for a live audience of 80,100 and 57.7 million TV viewers
  • Ticket price: $20 ($88.73 in 2018)

1984 (Super Bowl 18):

  • Raiders 38-9 Redskins
  • Apple MAC ad is a big deal
  • Halftime show: “Super Bowl XVIII’s Salute to the Superstars of the Silver Screen”
  • Ticket price: $60 ($145.24 in 2018)

1985 (Super Bowl 19):

  • Bears Super Bowl shuffle
  • Halftime show:”A World of Children’s Dreams”
  • Highlighted some trends in terms of the super bowl creating celebrities
  • Ticket price: $60 ($140 in 2018)

1991 (Super Bowl 25):

  • This Championship game had a lot of patriotic pride, as the U.S. was in the middle of the first Gulf War
  • The New York Giants were on their way to winning two Super Bowls in 5 years as they played the Buffalo Bills
  • New York had possession of the ball for a record 40 minutes and 33 seconds, with their longest drive clocking it at 9:29 in the third quarter before scoring on a one-yard run by running back Ottis Anderson
  • The Bills had one final chance to win the game on a field goal with seconds remaining, but the 47-yard attempt by Scott Norwood sailed wide, and the Giants sealed the victory, 20-19
  • Ticket price: $150 ($274.89 in 2018)
  • Halftime show: “A Small World Salute to 25 Years of the Super Bowl” featuring New Kids on the Block

1999 (Super Bowl 33):

  • Denver beat Atlanta 34-19
  • WASSUP Ad

2002 (Super Bowl 36):

  • With the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11 earlier in the season, it should only seem fitting that the New England Patriots would be competing in Super Bowl XXXVI. Though labeled as the underdogs
  • New England jumped to a 17-3 lead over the St. Louis Rams by the end of the second quarter. The game switched gears in the second half, as the Rams made up the points necessary to put the game at a 17-17 tie
  • On the final play of the game, Adam Vinatieri made a 48-yard field goal to give the Patriots the championship, 20-17. This game marked the first time a Super Bowl was decided on the points from the final play of the game
  • Ticket price: $400 ($554.94 in 2018)
  • Halftime show: U2

2004 (Super Bowl 38):

  • Super Bowl XXXVIII turned into a shootout in the fourth quarter, as the New England Patriots and the Carolina Panthers combined for a record 37 points in that period
  • When it was over, the New England Patriots came on top, 32-29, to win their second Super Bowl
  • The game was also noteworthy for its halftime show and the famous “wardrobe malfunction” when Janet Jackson’s breast was exposed by Justin Timberlake
  • Ticket price: $400 ($529.90 in 2018)

2015 (Super Bowl 49):

  • The hype leading up to Super bowl XLIX was some of the biggest of any game in the decade before it
  • The defending Super Bowl Champion Seattle Seahawks and their Legion of Boom on defense would take on one of the greatest post season quarterbacks of all time in Tom Brady
  • Brady and the Patriots had lost their two previous Super Bowl appearances and were looking for redemption
  • A back and forth game saw the Patriots take the lead with just over 2 minutes remaining in the game. But Russell Wilson and company drove the ball the length of the field and had a 2nd and goal situation with 26 seconds remaining. The game looked all but won for the Seahawks, when Malcolm Butler stepped in front of a slant route, to intercept Wilson, and seal the Patriots 4th Super Bowl win
  • Ticket price: $1,750 ($1,839.07 in 2018)
  • Halftime show: Katy Perry, Lenny Kravitz and Missy Elliott

2017 (Super Bowl 51):

  • Patriots 34, Falcons 28
  • It was the greatest comeback in Super Bowl history — the Patriots once trailed by 25 — led by Tom Brady, the greatest quarterback in NFL history, who threw for 466 yards. It gave Bill Belichick and Brady their fifth championship in seven trips, and it cemented the Patriots as one of the league’s top dynasties
  • Ticket price: $1,700 ($1,721.40 in 2018)
  • Halftime show: Lady Gaga

Sources:

ABC

TicketCity blog

History

 

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Fanalytics Podcast: 2018 NFL Playoff Fandom Preview

Before the 2018 NFL season ends, Mike Lewis and passionate sports fan Rhett Grametbauer give their general impressions of various teams’ fan bases. Grametbauer has visited every NFL stadium in the country so who better to ask than someone who has interacted with football fans across the country? What are Pittsburgh Steelers, New England Patriots, Kansas City Chiefs, Chicago Bears, Green Bay Packers, New Orleans Saints, and Los Angeles Rams fans like?

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Fanalytics Podcast: A Visit To Every NFL Stadium

In this Fanalytics episode, sports enthusiast and author Rhett Grametbauer joins Mike Lewis to talk about his thrilling journey visiting every NFL stadium in 16 weeks. Grametbauer took his 1967 Volkswagen bus named Hail Mary to visit the 32 football teams. He wrote about his adventure in his book called “25,000 Miles to Glory.”

This episode delves into the incredible escapade, study of consumers, ethnography, childhood memories, and what makes a stadium special.

To learn more about Rhett Grametbauer: https://www.rhettgrametbauer.com/

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Fanalytics Podcast: Super Bowl Economic Impact

Ever wonder about the economic impact a Super Bowl has on a city? Super Bowl LIII is taking place in Atlanta. Emory University Finance Professor Tom Smith and Marketing Professor Mike Lewis talk about the cash flow going through the city when the big showdown happens. Does it matter who’s playing in the Super Bowl from Atlanta’s economic perspective? Where does all the spending money go? What are the long term impacts a Super Bowl has on a city?

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Fanalytics Podcast: Social Media Branding

In this episode of the Fanalytics podcast, I sit down with Brian Penter of the Harlem Globetrotters.  The Globetrotters are an iconic brand that is reinventing itself for a new generation of fans.  Older fans probably remember the Globetrotters from mass media outlets like ABC’s Wide World of Sports or Saturday morning episodes of Scooby-Doo.

In today’s era, the brand and team have needed to embrace the digital and social worlds.  Brian implements the Globetrotters brand strategy through YouTube based content and social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

We talk about a variety of issues including:

  • How social media provides a connection point for the fan community
  • How the Globetrotters leverage the fandom of an older generation to target new customers
  • How the Globetrotters deal with the challenges of converting social media metrics to the bottom line
  • How social media is used to communicate the Globetrotters brand

Brian was a great guest with lots of insights.  Social is a challenge for all teams (and brands) and Brian provides first-hand knowledge of the challenges and opportunities of using this new marketing tool.  It’s an especially cool story because of the brand under study.  The Globetrotters might be the perfect mix of sports and entertainment.  You add that the team faces some really interesting marketing challenges such as trying to engage fans while only visiting each city once a year and you have a truly fascinating business to study.

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Fanalytics Podcast: Business of Sports

In this Fanalytics episode, Mike Lewis and Goizueta Association for Media, Entertainment, and Sports (GAMES) President Taylor Prewitt discuss the business of sports. More specifically, they focus on how students can leverage a MBA program to develop a career in sports. What job positions are realistic for students coming right out of graduate school? What skills do employers look for?

They also talk about how sports players build their brands and how politics play into sports. At the end of the episode, Mike takes questions from other Goizueta students curious about the world of sports.

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Esports Fandom Partnership with Skillshot

I am thrilled to announce a new research partnership devoted to the study of fandom in esports (I know opinions vary on the spelling – eSports, etc…).  We are partnering with the Skillshot division of Hi-Rez studios.  This is a great opportunity to do some very cool stuff in one of the hottest categories of sports and entertainment.  In particular, the digital world of competitive gaming provides some unique opportunities to study fandom.  The key is that in the digital world we can link watching, playing and buying.

As part of this new partnership I recently sat down with Zhe Han.  Zhe is my PhD student and he is working on a dissertation that examines how players respond to dynamic incentives in video games and other mobile applications.  Zhe is also an avid gamer and a big time consumer of esports.  In this episode we talk about a range of issues related to gaming and this (relatively) new phenomenon of esports.  There will be a LOT more to come.

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The official press release is below:

Esports Fandom Research Initiative Announced by Emory University and Skillshot Media

Partnership to explore the relationship between Watching and Playing within the rapidly growing esports sector

 

ATLANTA. November 1, 2018 The Marketing Analytics Center at Emory University and its Influential Analytics Lab are partnering with the Skillshot Media division of successful Georgia-headquartered gaming company Hi-Rez Studios to study consumer behavior and fandom in the rapidly growing esports sector.  The interactive entertainment industry, which includes video games, mobile gaming and competitive video gaming known as esports, generated over $100 billion in global revenues in 2017 alone.

The purpose of the Esports Fandom Research Initiative is to apply cutting edge analytics techniques informed by sophisticated psychological theories in order to study how the consumption of esports fosters consumer interest. The partnership will provide data and access for multiple PhD students to explore how passive consumption of esports leads to active engagement with games. Learnings can then be applied to better identify, understand, and utilize the explosive growth in business opportunities for game publishers, media companies, and brand sponsors within the esports space.

Most leading game publishers now have an intuition that an esports ecosystem supports higher player engagement and perhaps even higher in-game monetization”, said Todd Harris, President of Skillshot Media and co-founder of Hi-Rez Studios.  “We certainly share this hypothesis and are excited to test it more rigorously.  We’ll be supporting this experienced Emory research team to better quantify the relationship between watching esports and playing esports, which should help inform publishers and other partners on their esports investment and expected return.”

The Emory Marketing Analytics Center has been actively studying fandom in categories ranging from sports to politics. Gaming and esports provide exciting new opportunities to study evolving fandom, and the digital nature of esports programming and its consumption supplies researchers with extensive data with which to study behavior of casual consumers and hyper-invested fans alike.

The Research Program

The partnership between Emory University and Skillshot Media, the largest esports producer on the U.S. east coast, is focused on creating innovative and meaningful research projects related to esports and gaming. The core of the program is an emphasis on the consumer and gaining a better understanding of how the interactive nature of esports creates a new type of engagement and fandom. The research program aims to translate its outcome to a relevancy well beyond gaming, as trends in culture and technology all point to a future where industries ranging from education to fitness include digital delivery and gamification systems based on behavioral decision making theories.

Initial Projects:

Investigating the Interplay between Watching and Participation:
Interactive entertainment such as gaming provides opportunities for both active and passive consumption.  Traditionally consumers have interacted with games by being active players.  This active play has expanded in scope and scale and can now cross cultures and continents.  More recently, we have seen the growth of esports as a category where fans participate by watching high level players compete against each other.  This competition can be consumed in traditional physical arena settings or via streaming services or videos on demand.

Investigating Consumer Behavior in the Video Gaming Industry:

Gaming applications often feature a variety of dynamic incentive schemes and social community structures that can greatly influence consumer behavior.  Current research projects investigate how gamification systems such as rewards, leveling up and earning community status alter consumer preferences and purchasing behavior

For more information about the Esports Fandom Research Initiative, please contact mike [dot] lewis [at] emory [dot] edu at Emory University.

 

About the Marketing Analytics Center at Emory University

The Marketing Analytics Center at Emory University connects academic, business and student communities interested in the analysis of consumers.  It is directed by Professor Mike Lewis, who also conducts academic research through the Influential Analytics Lab.

 

About Skillshot Media:

Skillshot provides a turnkey esports solution for leading competitive titles, including online and offline tournament organisation, industry-leading esports production and active community management.  Skillshot has over five years of esports experience, hosting thousands of global competitors, paying out millions in tournament prizing and serving over one billion esports views to date.