W 09/21: Since Time Immemorial: Native Custom and Law in Colonial Mexico Workshop

The Interdisciplinary Workshop in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies and the Emory Department of History hosts the first event of their Fall 2022 Colonial/Postcolonial Seminar Series with Professor Yanna Yannakakis. She will present a section of her forthcoming book, Since Time Immemorial: Native Custom and Law in Colonial Mexico.

Since Time Immemorial traces the invention, translation, and deployment of Native custom as a legal category and strategy of empire in colonial Mexico. After the Spanish conquest, custom represented the primary mode through which Indigenous communities governed themselves and interfaced with authorities outside the community from the early 16th c. until independence from Spain in 1821. This book examines how the European category of custom was given local meaning, how it became part of the fabric of Indigenous communal life and a potent claim in Spanish courts, and how its purview changed and narrowed over time.

Professor Yannakakis’ Bio: Her research explores the social and cultural history of colonial Latin America, the history of Mexico, ethnohistory, the history of legal systems, and the interaction of indigenous peoples and institutions in Mexico. Her first book, The Art of Being In-Between: Native Intermediaries, Indian Identity, and Local Rule in Colonial Oaxaca (Duke University Press, 2008) examines how native cultural brokers negotiated with Spanish courts and the Catholic Church to open and maintain a space for the political and cultural autonomy of indigenous elites and their communities during Mexico’s colonial period. This book was awarded the 2009 Howard Francis Cline Memorial Award given by the Conference on Latin American History for the best book on the history of Latin America’s indigenous peoples.

Time: Wednesday, September 21st, 4pm-6pm EST

Location: Anthropology Building, Room 206

This seminar is co-sponsored by the Emory History Department. For questions, and if you would like to read a background chapter of Yannakakis’ book, please contact Hugo Hansen at hugo [dot] hansen [at] emory [dot] edu

Sat 10/15: Stickball Summit: Game and Panel Discussion

The Atlanta Beltline and Emory are co-sponsoring the Southeast Woodlands Stickball Summit, including a stickball game and panel discussion in collaboration with NAISI and the Carlos Museum. This event centers around the new Atlanta Beltline artwork “Itti’ kapochcha to’li’” by Addison Karl (Chickasaw and Choctaw). First, there will be an exhibition stickball game in the historic Old 4th Ward Activity Park, beginning at 10:30am EST, followed by a panel discussion about the history and future of stickball at 7:00pm EST.

Time: Saturday, October 15th, 10:30am-3:00pm, then 7:00pm

Place: Old 4th Ward Activity Field (the game), Ackerman Hall at the Carlos Museum (panel)

Toli (stickball) has been enjoyed by many of the Woodland Nations of the Southeast of the US. Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Cherokee have deep roots in the game. The Chickasaw played as a substitute for war, to settle disagreements, as well as enjoy sports and athletics. This artwork is a celebration of generation after generation playing this game. Karl dedicates this work to his grandfather, whose Toli sticks featured prominently in the home he grew up in and for the woodland nations on whose land the artwork is being installed. Click here to learn more.

Addison Karl Bio: Born in Denver, Addison Karl is currently base in Italy, and is a Chickasaw and Choctaw visual artist, painter, sculptor, and public artist. Karl’s artistic emphasis finds its way through multidisciplinary materials and methods to create a visual narrative. The execution of his visual library is deeply rooted within the methods of creation. Pulling references from personal interactions, nature, culture, the history of humanity, altruism, perception of colors, and emotional states. His process explores two main domains combining humanitarian figurative & aesthetic subject matter. In working internationally with different cultures, Addison has explored the social construct of individual versus community. These ideas raise issues he feels are primordial to discuss in both contemporary and public arenas. Furthermore, through his artistic practice, he hopes to reintroduce into shared visual space a sense of ownership.  Addison works with the Chickasaw Nation as a growing Culture Bearer.

Thu-F 10/27-28: Indigenous Language Path (ILP) Listening Sessions & Celebration of Muscogee Nation

There will be three Indigenous Language Path (ILP) listening sessions hosted at Emory this Fall!  The entire Emory community is invited to learn and provide insight into the university-wide project to develop physical reminders and rituals on Emory’s Oxford and Atlanta campuses to honor Muscogee language and knowledge, as the indigenous language and knowledge of this land.

On Oxford campus, there will be a dinner listening session for students, faculty, and staff, and on Atlanta campus there will be a faculty/staff breakfast session, a student lunch session, and in the afternoon a Muscogee Teach-in and Stomp Dance on the Academic Quad that will be open to all.

Information about these sessions and RSVP forms can be found here.

Time: 10/27 from 5:30pm-7:30pm (Oxford College Session) & 10/28 from 10:00am-11:30am and 12:00pm-1:30pm (Emory College Sessions) & 10/28 from 2:30pm-5:00pm (Teach-In and Stomp Dance)

Locations: Dean’s Dining Room (Oxford College Session) & Convocation Hall (Emory College Session) & Academic Quad (Muscogee Teach-In)

To learn more about the Indigenous Language Path, please visit: https://president.emory.edu/race-social-justice/task-force/language-path.html

Th 04/07: Indigenous Language Path Engagement – Atlanta Campus Faculty, Staff, and Student Session

The Emory community is invited to learn about and provide input into a university-wide project to develop physical reminders and rituals on Emory’s Oxford and Atlanta campuses to honor Muscogee language and knowledge as the indigenous language and knowledge of this land. To get started on the process toward the Path, will be a series of open engagement sessions with the Native-led consulting firm Kauffman Associates, Inc. (KAI). The third session is for faculty, staff and students on the Atlanta Campus and will be accompanied with dinner.

RSVP is required. All events are in-person encouraged, but there is also a Zoom option if needed. RSVP for in-person here or zoom here.

Time: Thursday, April 7, 2022, 5:30-7:00pm

Place: Atlanta Campus, Convocation Hall 210

To learn more about the Indigenous Language Path, please visit: https://president.emory.edu/race-social-justice/task-force/language-path.html

Please note that additional engagement opportunities are being planned for the Fall 2022 semester.

With questions, please contact religiouslife [at] emory [dot] edu

 

Th 04/07: Indigenous Language Path Engagement – Oxford Students Session

The Emory community is invited to learn about and provide input into a university-wide project to develop physical reminders and rituals on Emory’s Oxford and Atlanta campuses to honor Muscogee language and knowledge as the indigenous language and knowledge of this land. To get started on the process toward the Path, will be a series of open engagement sessions with the Native-led consulting firm Kauffman Associates, Inc. (KAI). The second session is for Oxford students on that campus and will be accompanied with lunch.

RSVP is required. All events are in-person encouraged, but there is also a Zoom option if needed. RSVP for in-person here or zoom here.

Time: Thursday, April 7, 2022, 12:00-1:30pm

Place: Oxford Campus, Dean’s Dining Room

To learn more about the Indigenous Language Path, please visit: https://president.emory.edu/race-social-justice/task-force/language-path.html

Please note that additional engagement opportunities are being planned for the Fall 2022 semester.

With questions, please contact religiouslife [at] emory [dot] edu.

 

Th 04/07: Indigenous Language Path Engagement – Oxford Faculty and Staff Open Session

The Emory community is invited to learn about and provide input into a university-wide project to develop physical reminders and rituals on Emory’s Oxford and Atlanta campuses to honor Muscogee language and knowledge as the indigenous language and knowledge of this land. To get started on the process toward the Path, will be a series of open engagement sessions with the Native-led consulting firm Kauffman Associates, Inc. (KAI). The first is a faculty and staff session on the Oxford Campus.

RSVP is required. All events are in-person encouraged, but there is also a Zoom option if needed. RSVP for in-person here or zoom here.

Time: Thursday, April 7, 2022, 10:00-11:30am

Place: Oxford Campus, Dean’s Dining Room

 

To learn more about the Indigenous Language Path, please visit: https://president.emory.edu/race-social-justice/task-force/language-path.html

Please note that additional engagement opportunities are being planned for the Fall 2022 semester.

With questions, please contact religiouslife [at] emory [dot] edu.

W 04/06: NPHW Keynote – Indigenous Teachings: Lessons for Public Health with Dr. Victoria O’Keeffe

In celebration of National Public Health Week 2022:

The Native American and Indigenous Studies Initiative, Rollins School of Public Health, and Native American Student Association welcome Dr. Victoria O’Keeffe, PhD, Mathuram Sanrosham Chair in Native American Health at Johns Hopkins University to present: Indigenous Teachings: Lessons for Public Health

Time: Wednesday, April 6th, 2022 at 4:30PM EST

Place: In-person at the Emory Student Center (ESC) in Multipurpose Rooms 5-6

W 03/23: Film Screening and Open Discussion of “Denying Access: NoDAPL to NoNAPL” by James Corwin and Tami Watt

Film screening of “Denying Access: NoDAPL to NoNAPL” by Dr. James Corwin and Tami Watt. Followed by an open discussion with Dr. James Corwin, Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Indigenous Studies at the University of Buffalo and citizen of the Seneca Nation (Deer Clan).

Free and open to the public. Mask required. No food or beverages.

Time: Wednesday, March 23rd at 7:00pm EST

Place: White Hall, Room 207

Event is co-sponsored by Emory University Hightower Fund, Center for Faculty Development and Excellence, Department of Anthropology, Department of Environmental Sciences, Department of Film and Media Studies, and Department of History. In conjunction with ant 280 class “Indigenous Peoples of North America” (Prof. Vidali).

T 03/01: Imperial History, Quechua Philology, and the Andean Hinterlands

The Department of Spanish and Portuguese presents a public lecture by Professor Leonardo Velloso-Lyons titled: Imperial History, Quechua Philology, and the Andean Hinterlands

Time: Tuesday, March 1st at 2:30PM EST

Place: Oxford Road Building Presentation Room (1390 Oxford Road)

Description: Professor Velloso-Lyons is currently Mabelle McLeod Lewis Fellow in the Department of Comparative Literature at Stanford University. This talk is the first product of Velloso-Lyons’s second book project, which springs from his findings concerning early modern knowledge, colonialism, genre and rhetoric. It examines how writers deploy their knowledge of non-European languages and cultures to create a hierarchy of regional groups legible to colonial authorities. These writers’s use of non-European languages in historical and literary works creates what he tentatively calls “implied geographies” that order, homogenize, and even efface certain non-European groups for the benefit of other non-European groups. Although Velloso-Lyons’s focus remains on writers from the many reaches of the Ibero-Atlantic empire, he turns away from the sixteenth-century’s reckoning with global colonialism toward seventeenth-century writers’ attempting (and ultimately failing) to create uniformity among non-European groups by effacing the ethnic and cultural diversity of each region in favor of uniform identities that would fit better the colonial superstructure. Velloso-Lyons currently anticipates chapters on Viceregal Peru, New Spain, Brazil, the Kingdom of Kongo, and Granada; this talk focuses on the Andean world, introducing some of the problems he expects to discuss with respect to sources from these regions.

F 03/04: Emory Faculty on Race – The Violence of Natural Law: Race, Indigeneity, and Citizenship

Emory College and the James Weldon Johnson Institute presents First Fridays at 4: Emory Faculty on Race

Title: “The Violence of Natural Law: Race, Indigeneity, and Citizenship”

March 4th, 2022 from 4pm-5:30pm. Zoom link here.

Speaker: Dr. Malinda Maynor Lowery, Cahoon Family Professor of American History

Talk Moderator: Dr. Falguni Sheth, Associate Professor, Director of Graduate Studies

Event description: Dr. Lowery, a historian of identity and sovereignty in American Indian nations, will talk with Dr. Sheth, a political philosopher of race and gender, about the invention of natural law in the 17th and 18th centuries and how its ramifications are felt today.