The Reformation of Suffering: A Kessler Conversation with Prof. Ronald Rittgers

Don’t miss the final installment of the Fall 2020 Kessler Conversations at Pitts Theology Library, a series of online interviews with leading church historians and theologians, asking this question, “What relevance do the events, personalities, and texts of the Protestant Reformation hold for contemporary communities?” These 30-45 minute conversations offer opportunities for the general public to learn about the events in Europe the 16th century and to consider what they tell us about the issues facing our communities. Conversations each semester will focus on a single contemporary theme and trace it back to the Reformers. This Fall, the Kessler Conversations focus on disease, healing, and pastoral care in the 16th century.

November’s conversation this week is with Dr. Ronald Rittgers of Valparaiso University. Professor Rittgers joined the VU faculty in the fall of 2006 after having taught for seven years at Yale University. He is the first occupant of the Erich Markel Chair in German Reformation Studies and serves as Professor of History, Theology, and Humanities. Professor Rittgers is interested in the religious, intellectual, and social history of medieval and Early Modern/Reformation Europe, focusing especially on theology and devotion. He will be speaking on the topic of “The Reformation of Suffering,” and the event will be live-streamed on November 4th at 12pm EST. Register for free at pitts.emory.edu/ronaldrittgers

In addition, catch up all September and October’s Kessler Conversations with Professors Anna Johnson (Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary) and Erik Heinrichs (Winona State University) at pitts.emory.edu/kesslerconversations! 

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