Course Schedule

August 31What’s Interesting About Emory: Asking the Right Questions

Together, we will take a look at three institutional histories at Emory, one of which you own (Hauk and King, Where Courageous Inquiry Leads, 2010) and the other two of which you can find either on reserve or in the stacks at various Emory libraries (Henry Bullock, A History of Emory University, 1936; and Thomas English, Emory University, 1915-1965: A Semicentennial History, 1987).
Questions: What interests the authors of these works about the university and its history? What questions do they ask? What questions don’t they ask? How are the books different from one another? How might you approach the topic differently?
Second Hour: Topic Brainstorming

September 7 – NO CLASS: LABOR DAY

First Writing Assignment
Emory: From Southern College to National University

Since we will have a two-week “vacation” from meeting as a class, there will be an independent assignment to get you thinking about how to approach Emory’s history in an analytical way. It is due in class on September 21, but aim to have it completed by September 14, as you will also have to complete the readings for September 21 and be ready for class discussion.

Read the following articles and chapters, one of which (Duke) is a thought piece on the meaning of Emory’s history, and the other four of which explore different periods of the university’s history. Then, write an essay of no less than 5 pages in which you use these readings to explore the following questions:
1) What were the major turning points in the growth and development of Emory University since its founding as Emory College in 1836? 2) How did each turning point change the character of the institution, and what implications did these changes have? 3) Given this history of change, what are the major questions we should be asking about the history of the university?

Readings:
Excerpt from A History of the Class of Eighty.
English, Emory University, 1915-1965, 10-62.
– Nancy Diamond, “Catching Up: The Advance of Emory
Since World War II,” in Hauk and King, 93-111.
– Leonard Ray Teel, “A Coke and a Smile: Emory University Decides How to Allot $100,000,000.”
– Marshall Duke, “Emory Are Here’: Emory as Place and
Story,” in Hauk and King, 3-12.

September 14 – NO CLASS: ROSH HASHANAH

Reminder: Aim to complete the first writing assignment by September 14, because you will also need to complete the readings for September 21 and be ready for class discussion.

September 21The Changing Meaning of Higher Education

Questions: How did fundamental assumptions about the meaning of higher education change during the half-century following World War II? Are there any continuities? Give concrete examples from the various documents.

Readings:
– Except from Report of the Lower Division Curriculum Committee (1954)
– Oral history interviews with Emory deans, in Hauk and
King, 122-155
– Paul Courtright, “Studying Religion at Emory,” in Hauk and
King, 363-368
Either: Delores P. Aldridge, “African American Studies at
Emory: A Model for Change,” in Hauk and King, 173-186
or Mary Odem and Candace Coffman, “Feminist Activism
and the Origins of Women’s Studies at Emory,” in Hauk
and King, 223-234.

First short paper is due in class.

September 28Diversity and Difference on Campus

Questions: How and where do issues of diversity and difference arise in the life of a university? How has the university responded to these issues and what do the responses reveal about Emory’s particular history and culture? How have these issues pushed the university to reshape its overall mission and worldview?

Readings:
Ginger Cain, “Women at Emory in the Nineteenth and
Twentieth Centuries”
– Melissa F. Kean, “National Ambition, Regional Turmoil:
The Desegregation of Emory,” in Hauk and King, 39-56.
– Stephanie DiIullo, “From Shanghai to Dixie: Tsoong
Kia-Tsing at Emory College”
– Also take a look at the current web page for Emory’s
Office of Multicultural Programs and Services. How have
issues of difference and diversity changed at Emory since
the 1960s and 1980s?

In-class film: From Silence to Recognition: Confronting Discrimination in Emory’s Dental School History

October 5NO CLASS – Independent Document Assignment

Because we will have another two-week “vacation” from class meetings, we will have our second short writing assignment, which entails using a packet of Emory-related documents to practice analyzing historical sources. The paper is due in class on October 19, but aim to complete it before Fall Break, because you will probably need to consult library materials at Emory and you also need to complete the readings for October 19 and be ready for class discussion.

For the assignment instructions, click here.
For group # 1’s documents, click here.
For group # 2’s documents, click here.

October 12 – NO CLASS: FALL BREAK

Reminder: Aim to complete the document assignment by October 12, because you will probably need to consult library materials at Emory and you also need to complete the readings for October 19 and be ready for class discussion.

October 19Beyond the Classroom: Campus Life

Questions: What are the different types of students Horowitz identifies? Do you agree with her typology and do you recogize these types of students on the Emory campus today? Would you add any other categories to her schema?

Readings:
Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Campus Life.

Document Assignment is due in class.

October 26 – In-class Workshop #1

Due in class: Thesis statements, 2-page introduction, and bibliography (five secondary sources and three primary sources). Bring three copies to class, one to hand in and two for an in-class workshop.

November 2 – In-class Workshop #2

Due in class: Paper outlines. The outlines should map out your argument by showing the various sections of the paper, the main points of each section that help build toward the argument, and the evidence you will use to support each point. Bring three copies to class, one to hand in and two for an in-class workshop.

November 9 – In-class Workshop #3

Due in class: Rough Drafts (no less than 12 pages)
Bring three copies to class, one to hand in and two for an in-class workshop

November 16 – NO FORMAL CLASS – instead, sign up for a one-on-one meeting with Prof. Goldstein to discuss your rough drafts.

November 23 – In-class presentations

November 30 – In-class presentations

December 7 –┬áIn-class presentations, LAST DAY OF CLASS