Suspense in the Archive, or: Did the Mid-Century Avant-garde Have a Southern Accent?

In July 2018, Dr. Anna Ioanes conducted research at Emory’s Rose Library as a recipient of our Short Term Fellowship program. Dr. Ioanes is Assistant Professor of English at the University of St. Francis. Archival research can be a suspenseful experience. The researcher turns pages and opens boxes, hoping to find something that is yet…

Frederick Law Olmsted in Atlanta

The Library of Congress recently announced a completed digitization project focusing on the collection of Frederick Olmsted.  As a manuscript archivist who has worked with the papers of the Druid Hills Civic Association (DHCA) and the Dana White papers, I knew immediately that the Library of Congress had missed highlighting Olmsted’s work in the South,…

Protest, Freedom, and Change from the South African Literature at the Rose Library

John Wamwara (SJD Candidate, School of Law) is 2017 –2018 Newton Teaching Scholar at the Rose Library. He is supporting the Rose Library Faculty Fellowship program and is reviewing the Rose Library’s collections on Africa. His doctoral research is on how law, religion, and culture have shaped the monogamy -polygamy debate in Kenya; and how…

Words are Power: Remembering the Storyteller Julius Lester

Among the thousands of authors found in the Stuart A. Rose Library, Julius Lester (1939-2018) is a giant. An essayist, writer, folklorist, civil rights activist, and teacher, Lester’s work has been an integral part of helping African Americans maintain the oral tradition of storytelling.  Through his creative explorations into the past, we are more aware…

Exploring Race Relations from the South African Collection at the Rose Library.

John Wamwara (SJD Candidate, School of Law) is 2017 – 2018 Newton Teaching Scholar at the Rose Library. He is supporting the Rose Library Faculty Fellowship program and is reviewing the Rose Library’s collections on Africa. His doctoral research is on how law, religion, and culture have shaped the monogamy – polygamy debate in Kenya;…

Talking back: bringing Beat counterculture into the modern era through dance

Author William S. Burroughs said, “In the U.S. you have to be a deviant or die of boredom.” Burroughs was certainly the former. He was a lifelong heroin addict, who wrote explicitly and affectionately of his drug use. He was openly queer at a time in American history when you could be arrested simply for…

“Create Your Own Culture” event celebrates DIY

On March 1st Rose Library celebrated the spirit of DIY at our first ever “Create Your Own Culture” event. Attendees made art, zines, poetry, t-shirts and enjoyed the music of Atlanta’s own Uniform.

Anthology, Archive, and Authority: Teaching with Lucille Clifton’s Papers

Marlo Starr (PhD Candidate, English Department) is the 2017-2018 Alice Walker Research Scholar in the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library. Her project centers on the archives and scholarship of poet and children’s book writer Lucille Clifton who was contemporary of Alice Walker. Marlo will be contributing towards a blog series based on…

“So be it”: Celebrating Lucille Clifton’s Life and Work

In perhaps her best recognized poem, “won’t you celebrate with me” Lucille Clifton invites readers to celebrate her life. Though “born in babylon / both nonwhite and woman,” the poem’s speaker explains that she has managed to forge a kind of life, and at the poem’s conclusion, she again asks us to celebrate: “that everyday…

Photographer Hugo Fernandes speaks about “Intimate Strangers”

Last night photographer Hugo Fernandes spoke in Emory’s Woodruff Library about his portrait series Intimate Strangers. To create the series of striking portraits, Fernandes recruited his subjects using websites and apps primarily designed to arrange hook ups (brief sexual encounters). His strategy has changed as the technology has changed, from using sites like gay.com in…