Talking back: bringing Beat counterculture into the modern era through dance

Author William S. Burroughs said, “In the U.S. you have to be a deviant or die of boredom.” Burroughs was certainly the former. He was a lifelong heroin addict, who wrote explicitly and affectionately of his drug use. He was openly queer at a time in American history when you could be arrested simply for…

“Create Your Own Culture” event celebrates DIY

On March 1st Rose Library celebrated the spirit of DIY at our first ever “Create Your Own Culture” event. Attendees made art, zines, poetry, t-shirts and enjoyed the music of Atlanta’s own Uniform.

Anthology, Archive, and Authority: Teaching with Lucille Clifton’s Papers

Marlo Starr (PhD Candidate, English Department) is the 2017-2018 Alice Walker Research Scholar in the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library. Her project centers on the archives and scholarship of poet and children’s book writer Lucille Clifton who was contemporary of Alice Walker. Marlo will be contributing towards a blog series based on…

“So be it”: Celebrating Lucille Clifton’s Life and Work

In perhaps her best recognized poem, “won’t you celebrate with me” Lucille Clifton invites readers to celebrate her life. Though “born in babylon / both nonwhite and woman,” the poem’s speaker explains that she has managed to forge a kind of life, and at the poem’s conclusion, she again asks us to celebrate: “that everyday…

Photographer Hugo Fernandes speaks about “Intimate Strangers”

Last night photographer Hugo Fernandes spoke in Emory’s Woodruff Library about his portrait series Intimate Strangers. To create the series of striking portraits, Fernandes recruited his subjects using websites and apps primarily designed to arrange hook ups (brief sexual encounters). His strategy has changed as the technology has changed, from using sites like gay.com in…

Celebrate the Service of African Americans in WWI

Opening soon at the Rose Library,  “A Question of Manhood: African Americans and WWI” commemorates the centennial of the First World War, while celebrating the African American men who served as citizen-soldiers at a time when they were systematically denied full access to the promises democracy. The exhibit explores the challenges and conflicts, as well…

Alciato’s Emblems

Emory University has an incredible collection of emblem books, largely thanks to the efforts of Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Art History, Dr. Walter Melion. The contents of this collection are divided between the Pitts Theology Library in the Candler School of Theology and Rose Library. Among Rose’s portion of the collection is a 1584…

Alfonso Chacón’s Comprehensive Documentation of Trajan’s Column

Alfonso Chacón lived from 1530-1599 CE and was a Spanish Dominican scholar in Rome. He was an expert of ancient Graeco-Roman and Paleo-Christian epigraphy and was knowledgeable in medieval paleography and manuscripts. His work Historia Vtriusque Belli Dacici a Traiano Caesare Gesti : Ex Simulachris Quae in Columna Eiusdem Romae Visuntur Collecta, published in 1576,…

A Repulsive Monument to Stone Mountain and Black Resistance

In summer 2016, Barry Mauer, associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Central Florida, conducted research with Rose Library’s Kelly Miller family papers and Stone Mountain collection. The “repulsive monument” is a textual genre invented by Gregory Ulmer. Repulsive monuments honor abject losses, which result from a collective’s behaviors but are…

Collection spotlight: Boisfeuillet Jones papers

The Rose Library is proud to announce that the papers of Atlanta civic leader, Boisfeuillet Jones, are open and available for use. From 1935 until his death in 2001, Boisfeuillet Jones influenced health, education, and welfare policy, and charitable actions on the national, state, and local levels. The Atlanta area especially bears Jones’ mark: the…

Medieval Europe in Atlanta: The Value of Facsimiles

Over the past three years, a large part of my research as a medieval art historian has been on a manuscript of Las Cantigas de Santa María, a 13th century Spanish collection of miracle stories performed by the Virgin Mary. The manuscript is currently kept in the library of El Escorial, approximately 4,000 miles away from…