Author Archives: Melanie Pincus

About Melanie Pincus

Melanie is a PhD student in the Neuroscience program at Emory. She is studying how chronic stress in female macaques interacts with experiential factors, including pubertal timing and diet, to alter the development of corticolimbic circuitry important for emotion regulation. She enjoys pursuing inter-disciplinary questions to better understand complex relationships between the developing brain, neuroendocrine system, gut microbiome, and behavior. She is a CMBC affiliate and contributed blog posts for the CMBC Lunch series from 2014-2015.

Now You See It, Now You Don’t: Scientists, Humanists, and Collective Memory

Thursday, April 16, 2015 Angelika Bammer and Hazel Gold What exactly do we mean when say “collective memory” and how might individuals’ personal memories of an event converge into a cohesive memory maintained by a group? This was the central … Continue reading

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How to Build Bridges between Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Psychology

Tuesday, March 24, 2015 Dieter Jaeger and Phillip Wolff In the first CMBC Faculty Lunch Discussion of the Spring 2015 semester, titled ‘How to Build Bridges between Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Psychology?’ Dr. Phillip Wolff (Department of Psychology, Emory University) … Continue reading

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Thinking Musical Thoughts

Wednesday, December 17, 2014 Don Saliers and Richard Patterson Dr. Don Saliers (William R. Cannon Distinguished Professor of Theology and Worship, Candler School of Theology) and Dr. Richard Patterson (Philosophy) held the second CMBC Faculty Lunch Discussion of the 2014 … Continue reading

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From Rambo to Rushdie via Linklater and Lavant: Our Peanut Butter Cup Runneth Over

Friday, October 17, 2014 Marshall Duke and Daniel Reynolds In the first CMBC lunch talk of the 2014 academic school year, Dr. Marshall Duke (Psychology, Emory University) and Dr. Daniel Reynolds (Film and Media Studies, Emory University) discussed their recent … Continue reading

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