History Undergrad Courses

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History

  • HIST 190: Freshman Seminar
    • Course Description: Introduces first-year students to the discipline of history, particularly historical sources and methods; aims to improve critical reading, analytical, and writing skills in small group discussion.
    • Topics Include: Transnational Black Experience on Film; Charts, Maps & Graphs; Hindu Nationalism in India
    • Frequently Taught By: Leroy Davis Jr, Elena Conis, Bikramjit De

 

  • HIST 203: The West in World Context
    • Course Description: Examines the interaction of European cultures with other world cultures, and considers that interaction’s impact both on the West and the World.
    • Frequently Taught By: Ashleigh Dean

 

  • HIST 204: The Silk Road and Central Eurasia
    • Course Description: This course introduces students to the central nexus of commercial, cultural and political exchange in Eurasia over the course of nearly three millennia. From the Bronze Age to the rise of European sea-borne hegemony, the Silk Road sent the horse and Buddhism to China, silk and the Black Death to Europe, Islam and Sufi mysticism into South Asia. From the great world Empires of Chingis Khan and Alexander to the mercantile city-states of Central Asia and Sinkiang, the lands of the Silk Road shaped human history profoundly. The story of the region will be told by ancient mummies and Chinese monks, Persian heroes and Arab ambassadors, Venetian merchants and warrior princes. Classics of world literature such as the Avesta, the Rigvedas, Firdusi’s Shahnamaand Herodotus’ Histories, travelogues of Xuangzang and Marco Polo, the autobiography of Babur and Sufi poetry will supplement more scholarly accounts. And in these stories, students will hear the tale of the world’s first globalization and see, it is hoped, a mirror of their own world. This class will meet the General Education Requirement in History, Society and Culture (HSC); it is not intended to be a preparation course for later Eurasian history courses nor does it presume that students have knowledge of the topic.
    • Frequently Taught By: Matthew J Payne

 

  • HIST 221: The Making of Modern Africa
    • Course Description: Traces the gradual incorporation of Africa into an expanding world economy and examines the impact of this incorporation on the development of African societies and modern nation states.
    • Frequently Taught By: Kristin Mann

 

  • HIST 241: Topics in History and Texts
    • Course Description: The course demonstrates how literary, artistic, and/or cinematic texts, when understood in relation to the context of their production, can be used to study selected historical themes.
    • Topics Include: Tropical Encounters
    • Frequently Taught By: Brian Vicks

 

  • HIST 265: The Making of Modern South Asia
    • Course Description: What does it mean to study the history of South Asia? Does it entail studying the discrete patterns within a geographic entity, largely understood as India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and more recently, Afghanistan? Or is it to understand the history of this region so as to better appreciate the present conjuncture in which these countries appear? When did South Asia even become a geographic unit that one could study and moreover, how did this region yield to the separate nation-states; in other words, what is the modern history of South Asia?
    • Frequently Taught By: Shatam Ray

 

  • HIST 285: Topics Historical Analysis
    • Course Description: An introductory course on the nature and methods of history. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
    • Topics include: Plantation to Postcolonial, Hitchhiking the Atlantic, Opium to Obamacare, Guano to Cocaine: Global Latin America, Women/Health/Sexuality: Africa, Ethnic Experience in America, South Asian History and Identity, The Great Powers: Middle East, Colonial Contests: 1492-1830, Cities/Citizens in Latin America
    • Frequently Taught By: Robert Goddard, Andrew Britt, Elena Conis, Abigail Meert, Jonathan Coulis, Ashley Parcells, Jonathan D Prude, Ruby Lal, Ziv Rubinovitz, Dawn Peterson, Ariel Svarch

 

  • HIST 309: Europe in the Age of Empire
    • Course Description: Examines the growth of cities, the intensification of consumer culture among the middle classes, the revolutionary and role of empire In Europe.
    • Frequently Taught By: Julia Lopez Fuentes, Walter L Adamson

 

  • HIST 351: Special Topics
    • Course Description: Topics related to economic change outside the United States or in which the U.S. is only one area of comparison. Slave trade, global economies, economic thought, colonialism, or comparative economic systems.
    • Topics Include: Non-US Economic History, The Origins of Capitalism, Consumer and Industrial Revolution
    • Frequently Taught By: Judith A. Miller

 

  • HIST 360: Mexico
    • Course Description: This course examines 500 plus years of Mexican history, from the Aztec Empire to today’s
    • Topics Include: Aztecs to Narcos
    • Frequently Taught By: Yanna Yannakakis, Audrey Henderson

 

  • HIST 361: Brazil
    • Course Description: Covering the history of Brazil since Portuguese colonization, this course addresses conquest, colonial structures and legacies, questions of race and identity, political institutions, and migration. Themes include slavery, cultural diversity, economic development, and Brazil’s role in the world
    • Topics Include: Country of the Future
    • Frequently Taught By: Maria de los Angeles Picone, Thomas Rogers

 

  • HIST 362: History of the Caribbean
    • Course Description: Development of the major islands of Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico, from colonial times to the present. Emphasizes evolution of plantation societies, slavery and race relations, international rivalries, economic dependence, political independence, and social revolutions.
    • Frequently Taught By: Thomas Rogers

 

  • HIST 364: African Civilization, Transatlantic Slave
    • Course Description: Political, social, economic, and cultural history of sub-Saharan African civilizations, from the rise of the Sudanic empires through the impact of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.
    • Frequently Taught By: Kristin Mann

 

  • HIST 367: The Making of South Africa
    • Course Description: Evolution of South Africa from a society based on the principle of systematic racial segregation to a multiracial democracy. Origins of racial segregation and apartheid, nationalist struggles, challenges of post-apartheid development.
    • Frequently Taught By: Clifton Crais

 

  • HIST 385: Special Topics
    • Course Description: Selected topics in history for advanced students. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
    • Topics Include: South Asian Politics since 1945, Women in India, Economics, Nation and Empire of India, Ghandi: Non-Violence and Freedom, Race and Caste: America and India, Afro &American Diaspora, Sugar and Rum, African Slavery and Spanish America, Latin American Immigration Rights, Ghandi: Non-Violence
    • Frequently Taught By: Marion Creekmore Jr., Ruby Lal, Navyug Gill, Velcheru Rao, Gyanendra Pandey, Leroy Davis Jr., Robert Goddard, Nicholas Jones, Mary Odem

 

  • HIST 487: Colloquium: Europe
    • Course Description: Topics Vary
    • Topics Include: Muslims in Russia
    • Frequently Taught By: Matthew J Payne

 

  • HIST 488: Colloquium: U.S.
    • Course Description: Topics Vary
    • Topics Include: Roots of Empire in the US, Slave/Empire: Us. Revolutionary Era
    • Frequently Taught By: Dawn Peterson

 

  • HIST 489RW: Latin America and Non-Western World
    • Course Description: (Similar in nature and format to History 487 and 488.) Recent colloquia in the area include The Palestine Mandate, Fundamentalism in East Asia, and Empires: Past and Present.
    • Topics Include: Explorations in Modern World History, History of Violence, Rebellions/Revolts/Revolution, History of Violence, Race and Caste: America and India
    • Frequently Taught By: Clifton Crais, Gyan Pandey, Leroy Davis Jr

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