Hormone Therapy Can Treat Breast and Prostate Cancers

Certain types of cancer, such as breast and prostate cancer, rely on hormones to grow and develop. These types of cancerous cells have receptors that attach to hormones, allowing them to divide and spread. The growth of these cancers can be halted if the hormones are blocked or modified. Hormone cancer therapy accomplishes this by blocking specific hormones as well as changing how they behave. Especially when combined with other cancer therapies, hormone therapy can successfully eradicate specific types of cancers. The idea behind hormone therapy arose in 1874 when English doctor Thomas Beatson discovered that by removing the ovaries Read More …

Understanding Epilepsy

Movie theater attendees are probably familiar with the “flash” and “strobe lights” warnings for children or adults that occasionally accompany films. These warnings are put in place to protect those with epilepsy and other health issues since photosensitive epilepsy seizures can be triggered by flashing lights or contrasting light and dark patterns. These warnings can help ensure the health and safety of those living with epilepsy. However, an accurate and a fuller understanding of epilepsy can help further protect those with epilepsy that live amongst us, even beyond the movie theater. Epilepsy is a chronic central nervous system disorder that Read More …

Your Thyroid Called, it Wants its Hormones Checked

The thyroid gland is one of the most essential glands in our bodies. In fact, the thyroid was named after a Greek shield at the time of its discovery. This butterfly shaped gland is responsible for regulating the metabolic rate, which controls heart, muscle, and digestive function, as well as brain development and bone maintenance. The thyroid gland relies on a sufficient supply of iodine to function correctly. See Image 1. The thyroid gland releases three hormones: T3 (Triiodothyronine), T4 (Tetraiodothyronine), and Calcitonin. These hormones are essential for growth, neuronal development, reproduction, regulation of energy, and metabolism. In fact, our Read More …

What is Alzheimer’s Disease?

With the improvement of medicine and technology, the life expectancy of most people is increasing. While that is an incredible feat of human progress, age is one of the primary risk factors of Alzheimer’s disease, though researchers believe that the disease may develop from a number of factors. Alzheimer’s disease, the most common cause of Dementia, is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States. Symptoms include memory loss, decline in executive functions such as problem solving and judgement, navigation problems, language difficulties, and social withdrawal. Alzheimer’s disease is progressive, meaning that symptoms grow more severe and cognitive Read More …

What is the Nutraceuticals Market?

As a child, the highlight of my morning routine was eating Flintstone vitamin gummies with my breakfast. I delighted in munching on Dino and Fred Flintstone, and picking my exact combination of red, yellow, and purple gummies for the day. While gummy multivitamins may have added some joy to breakfast, they also provided valuable supplements to my diet. Multivitamins are just one example of nutraceuticals, products derived from food that provide health benefits. Nutraceuticals include items such as functional food (food with extra health benefits such as seeds, nuts, and milk with extra protein), medicinal food, and dietary supplements. Functional Read More …

Hepatitis Basics

Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. There are multiple types of Hepatitis, and most are caused by a viral infection. However, extreme alcohol use, some medications, and certain medical conditions can also cause Hepatitis. The liver is a vital organ that performs over 500 functions to keep the body healthy; it digests food and processes nutrients, battles infections, recycles and filters blood, maintains the level of sugar in the bloodstream, flushes out toxins, and more. When the liver is inflamed, its function can be affected. Many people with Hepatitis suffer from a loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, digestive issues, Read More …

*Cracks Knuckles* So What is Arthritis?

Knuckle cracking can be very stress relieving for most people. Some people enjoy it so much that they can also crack other parts of their body, such as their neck, back, or even their toes. There is a long list of myths and superstitions revolved around knuckle cracking, the most infamous of which is that it can cause arthritis. Arthritis is literally defined as “inflammation of the joint” and can be an informal way of referring to joint pain or disease. Contrary to popular belief, people of all ages can and do have arthritis, and it is the leading cause Read More …

Looking at Healthy Vision Month in a New Light

The phrase “eat your carrots; they’re good for your eyes!” is a staple part of many childhoods. This is part of a larger truth–diets rich with fruits and vegetables are important for keeping your eyes healthy. Research shows there are benefits to eating dark leafy greens (like kale, collard greens, and spinach) and foods high in omega-3 fatty acids (like salmon and tuna). This blog will focus on understanding how the eye works, different common eye conditions and diseases, and resources to promote healthy vision. The National Eye Institute’s (NEI) NEI for Kids page offers an excellent simplified explanation of Read More …

Climate Change’s Impact on Nutrition

When climate change is discussed, it is often in the context of natural disasters, rising temperatures, and rising sea levels. However, conversations about climate change should also include the impacts that climate change will have on food and nutrition.  Natural disasters such as floods, droughts, heatwaves, and wildfires can impact nutrition by driving down crop yields, hindering the transport of food, and destroying livestock. In addition, the rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere can decrease the nutritional value of global staple crops like rice and wheat. The impact on nutrition is supported by research that was conducted by Sam Read More …

Multiple Sclerosis 101

During the second and third season, The West Wing’s fictional president is diagnosed with a debilitating and difficult disease that ultimately leads to a scandal in Washington. His relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) is portrayed with relative accuracy and was commended by The National MS Society—the president continues on to have a productive life, keeping most of his symptoms out of the public eye. MS is an autoimmune disease where the body’s immune system attacks the myelin– a protective layer around the nerves fibers of the spine made of proteins and fats. The cause of MS is unknown. The resulting injuries Read More …