11 ways to get involved in entrepreneurship at Emory

Emory University is one of the central entrepreneurial innovation hubs in the US. The school achieves this legacy through the resources it offers to its students, including classes, school-sanctioned events, and extracurricular clubs. There are so many ways for Emory student, faculty, and staff to hone their entrepreneurial spirit – start with this list. Extracurricular organizations 1. Emory Entrepreneurship and Venture Management (EEVM) The most popular entrepreneurial organization for undergrads on campus, EEVM’s mission is to assist student entrepreneurs and foster a business spirit at Emory. One of its most well-known activities is HackATL, a weekend-long business hackathon that has Read More …

Angel investing vs. venture capital: What’s the difference?

It’s no secret that you need funding to launch a start-up, and angel investing and venture capital are two of the most common sources. There are significant differences between these types of funding, and the right fit depends on both the characteristics of the inventor (you) and the terms of investments. What is an angel investor? An angel investor is someone that provides a large amount of their own money to an early-stage startup. Some angels invest independently, but often investors will join angel networks in which they pool funds to make larger investments. In exchange for this monetary support, Read More …

Emory’s Female Founders Forum promotes underrepresented innovators

This is the first installment of a series featuring the Female Founders Forum at Emory (F3@E). This year’s cohort members include Drs. Rasheeta Chandler, Elaine Fisher, Louise Hecker, Rebecca Levit, Cassandra Quave, Sarwish Rafiq, and Chunhui Xu. Out of the estimated $283.3 billion venture capital (VC) allocated in 2022, start-ups with all-women teams received just $4.5 billion – less than 2% of the total funding. F3@E is one step that Emory University is taking in response to this disparity. An initiative created by Deborah W. Bruner, Senior Vice President for Research, in partnership with Emory’s Office of Technology Transfer (OTT), Read More …

Funding Opportunities for Women-Owned Start-Ups

Women-owned businesses are on the rise: According to 2022 census data, their average earnings increased by 27% from 2021, they employ 10.9 million Americans, and they had an estimated $432.1 billion in annual payroll. But despite these impressive numbers, women-owned businesses still lag behind their non-women-owned counterparts in an important area. While women-owned businesses were more likely to take funding compared to men in 2022, they got less money. In 2022, male-owned businesses received 41% more in funding than women-owned enterprises. Since a lack of funding can prevent a start-up from getting off the ground, these facts put women-owned start-ups Read More …

4 Federal Grant Options for Small Businesses and Start-ups

Ask any entrepreneur, and they’ll tell you that money is a top concern for their small business. Profits are essential, but grants specifically for small businesses can also be a gamechanger for their long-term success. Grants – monetary awards designated for a specific purpose – help small businesses in more ways than one. They can bring in more cash flow, offer visibility and credibility, and make businesses more likely to receive other forms of funding. For U.S.-based companies, there are several small business grant options, starting with the government. Does the government provide small business grants? Yes! The United States Read More …

What does that Venture Capital Term Mean? – Part 2

Venture capital (VC) is a form of financing that is private and provided by investors, investment banks, or other financial institutions to startup companies and small businesses, particularly those with long-term growth potential. Often seen as the “engine of economic growth”, venture capital investors provide funds to early-stage companies or start-ups in exchange for equity or ownership stake. To help introduce you to the world of Venture Capital, we’ve compiled a list of some of the most common terms in this field. You can find part one of this blog here. Common Venture Capital Terms & Concepts Securities and Exchange Read More …

What does that Venture Capital Term Mean? – Part 1

Venture Capital (VC) is a form of financing that is private and provided by investors, investment banks, or other financial institutions to startup companies and small businesses, particularly those with long-term growth potential. Often seen as the “engine of economic growth”, venture capital investors provide funds to early-stage companies or start-ups in exchange for equity or ownership stake. To help introduce you to the world of Venture Capital, we’ve compiled a list of some of the most common terms in this field. Common Venture Capital Terms & Concepts Venture Capitalist (VC): A venture capitalist is the first term that is Read More …

The Differences between SBIR and STTR Cheat Sheet

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs both provide Small Business Administration (SBA) grants to small businesses for research. The two programs share the same three phases, with separate federal contracts awarded for Phases I and II. Phase I is innovation and research, where the scientific merit and commercial viability of an innovation is studied.  Phase II focuses on the innovation’s development, demonstration and delivery. Phase III involves preparation for commercial rollout and is funded by outside sources rather than the SBA. While the two programs share many similarities, they have some important differences Read More …

Faculty as Start-up Founder: One Man’s Experience

Raymond Dingledine, PhD is Emory professor of Pharmacology and co-founder of Emory’s screening facility. His research focuses on the pharmacology of glutamate receptors and the causes of epilepsy. Dingledine’s has received numerous awards such as the ASPET’s Robert R. Ruffolo Career Achievement Award in Pharmacology and election to the National Academy of Medicine. He has published over 200 research papers, served as editor of “Molecular Pharmacology,” and sat on the editorial board of “Molecular Interventions.” Ray is also co-founder of Emory start-up NeurOp. In this interview he shares some of his thoughts and experiences as co-founder of a company. Tell Read More …

Emory Start-ups Continue to Have Impact, Success, and Products to Market

In 2014, OTT published a comprehensive survey of all start-up companies founded on Emory intellectual property. The results proved Emory to be an economic hub in the South, generating not only private and public investment capital, but also job growth and life-saving products. Across the 72 companies surveyed at the time, 1,200 workers had been employed at peak, mostly in the areas of drug development, diagnostic materials, and software-based products. These start-ups cumulatively raised more than a billion dollars in funding and brought 30 different products to market. Now, five years later, OTT has updated its survey, unquestionably demonstrating the Read More …

An Introduction to Investor Pitches

You’ve filled out all the paperwork, organized all your patents, developed your prototypes, and maybe started selling products. Your company has reached the point where if you want to get any further, you’ll need some money. It’s time to pitch to investors. The biggest mistake you can make when developing a business pitch is thinking that what you’re pitching is simply a business or a product. Investors hear of great ideas and promising businesses constantly. A key element that distinguishes one company from the next is the people running it. Try to pitch the team behind the company. A great Read More …

The Small Business Administration: Its Resources and Opportunities

Getting a startup off the ground is a grueling task. What’s harder is working through the process alone. Luckily, the U.S. federal government recognizes the value in entrepreneurship and as such, works to support small companies through various resources offered by the Small Business Administration (SBA). In this article, we will highlight the key resources offered by the SBA broken into four categories. Funding Programs For its funding programs, the SBA mostly acts as a mediator between lenders and small businesses. For instance, interested entrepreneurs can utilize the SBA’s Lender Match service, an online referral tool that connects small businesses Read More …

Business Plan Example

This is the companion post to our introduction to business plans, you can find that post here. Executive Summary MotionBud Inc. designs, manufactures, and markets a practical and portable non-pharmaceutical approach to motion sickness that prioritizes style, comfort, and effectiveness. Our mission is to lead the motion sickness relief market in the development of novel solutions that target the inner ear, our brain’s motion sensor, directly. Our FDA approved device is the first of its kind on a market that traditionally favors OTC drugs and acupressure wristbands. As roughly 50% of the world’s population suffers from motion sickness in some Read More …

Getting Started with a Business Plan

A business plan outlines a company’s goals and the strategies by which it achieves these goals. Typically, a business plan consists of: a) an executive summary, b) a description of products or services, c) industry overview/market analysis, d) marketing and sales strategies, e) operations/execution strategy, f) competitive analysis, g) description of management team, h) financial statement and i) an exit strategy. Below is a high-level description of each of these components. A business plan starts with an executive summary, an overview of the business plan. This operates as a reader on the company and is meant to concisely communicate its Read More …

Corporate Structures for the Newbie

Choosing a corporate structure isn’t just an exercise in paperwork – it determines the company’s tax status, as well as its relationship to potential investors and managers. In this regard, it is one of several key decisions to be made in the early life of your startup. Generally speaking, there are four primary considerations that can guide this decision-making process. These are a) tax requirements, b) access to outside funding, c) level of legal protection, and d) administrative obligations. Below is an outline for a handful of common corporate structures relevant to university-based startups focusing on these elements. C Corporations Read More …

STTR/SBIR Proposal Assistance Resources

In the world of startup funding, resources and donors abound. Securing a piece of this abundance, however, is quite a tricky prospect. Two such funding programs, the STTR (Small Business Technology Transfer Research) and SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research), are operated by the U.S. government agencies such as NIH, DOD and others. These initiatives allot federal research money to small businesses with the intent of funding scientific research directed towards commercialization efforts. This article will dive deeper into the STTR/SBIR application process, highlighting various resources available to researchers who wish to utilize such funding in their own startup efforts. A Read More …

The OTT POC Fund: A Little Goes a Long Way

What’s one of the biggest hurdles to startup success? Finding enough money to start. Seed funding is absolutely critical to getting new technologies on the market. It’s the money that can help give an idea a physical shape, put it on the path to becoming a full-fledged product. The POC fund is a simple idea reflected in its simple acronym: proof of concept. The fund is meant to give Emory inventors enough money to develop their product with as little bureaucratic stalling as possible. By getting funds into the hands of innovators quickly and effectively, and by helping provide follow-up Read More …

Crowdfunding Your Start-up? Be Wary.

Crowdfunding has been all the rage for years now. Take Ouya or the Pebble Watch, for example, which raised millions of dollars within a matter of weeks. The product-based platforms of Kickstarter or IndieGoGo aren’t even the only ones out there—equity crowdfunding is also becoming a popular method of raising funds among newer startups, even those that already have Series A funding. But it’s important to know crowdfunding isn’t without its drawbacks. Start-ups, especially less established ones, need to be careful before turning to the world wide web for what seems like free money. It isn’t. Money off the Top Read More …

Monte Eaves: A Kauffman Success Story

Monte Eaves is a professor of surgery at Emory University and Medical Director at Emory Aesthetic Center. He is also the man behind EMRGE, a company developing products that are revolutionizing the wound closure industry. EMRGE challenges the traditional needle and thread wound closure procedure with noninvasive and cost-effective technology that promotes healing and minimizes scarring. For this, Eaves was recently awarded the Office of Technology Transfer (OTT) award for 2017 Startup of The Year, one of many achievements. Shortly after, we got to talk with him about how he got there and the role OTT and Emory’s Kauffman Foundation Read More …

Venture Funding, Tranches, What?

Every start-up wants to become the next verb. “She definitely Photoshopped that image.” “Do you think we can Uber home from here?” “Here, let me Google that for you.” But before any of those companies ever had their names added to the Oxford English Dictionary, they were lean units, not even a fraction of the size they are today. Those small groups of entrepreneurs got to realize their dream through accumulating funding — at first, coming from the pockets of their family and friends, but eventually from dedicated venture capitalists. The list below will detail each formalized round of start-up Read More …