Ryan Runager

An Online Education in Belonging

In After Whiteness: An Education in Belonging, Willie James Jennings explores the implications of white supremacy and racial identity on American Christianity and education. He argues that white supremacy has profoundly impacted American society and religion and created a culture of segregation and exclusion. For Jennings, American Christianity must embrace a new theology of belonging […]

An Online Education in Belonging Read More »

Building Community in the Online Learning Environment Using Canvas LMS

As online learning becomes more and more accessible, so does the possibility of a more isolated educational experience. Building community, especially in theological education, is essential to student learning.  It is important that the online environment be just as welcoming, hospitable, and supportive for online students as it is in the in-person classroom. A well-designed

Building Community in the Online Learning Environment Using Canvas LMS Read More »

Mapping Out Our Assessment Ecologies as a Theological Practice

By: Ryan Runager and Dr. Sarah Bogue Often, for many classes, getting a particular grade or simply completing the assignment is more important than the learning of class material.  Asao B. Inoue, Professor of Rhetoric and Composition at Arizona State University, writes: Classroom writing assessment is more important than pedagogy because it always trumps what

Mapping Out Our Assessment Ecologies as a Theological Practice Read More »

Using Design Thinking in the Theological Classroom

What does a business concept have to do with teaching theology? Tom Kelly writes that a “Hands-on, user-centric approach to problem solving can lead to innovation, and innovation can lead to differentiation and competitive advantage.” As theological educators, our work is not inclined toward competitive advantage. Our work is to be present, embodied, and full

Using Design Thinking in the Theological Classroom Read More »

Canvas Peer Review Guide for Students

What exactly are peer reviews? Peer reviews are assignments where students receive another’s paper, make comments and annotate, and return to its original owner. They’re a tool used by faculty to improve student writing, feedback skills, and to clarify learning goals and assignment details. However, they’re not always so clear. Through several conversations with students,

Canvas Peer Review Guide for Students Read More »

An Instructor’s Guide to Canvas Peer Review

Traditionally, peer review involves bringing papers to class, swapping, and finding time in class to read and review them. Now, we have Canvas LMS! A peer review assignment enables students to provide feedback on another student’s assignment submission. Peer reviews are a tool that allows communication between students and can help students master the concepts

An Instructor’s Guide to Canvas Peer Review Read More »

6 Benefits to Peer Review in Theological Education

Simply put, peer review assignments enable students to provide feedback to each other. They are another tool to put in your pedagogical tool belt. There is a lot of research on peer review in the classroom. We will cover some best practices later in this article. The following Benefits to Peer Review we present here

6 Benefits to Peer Review in Theological Education Read More »

Twitter for Academics: An Invitation to Public Theology

I recently spoke with a colleague who was curious about academic twitter (#AcademicTwitter). She mentioned how it has become a repository of resources. Everything from book launches to news articles – it’s so valuable. Our conversation shifted, however, once we began talking about Twitter best practices and how to use it.  For many academics, Twitter

Twitter for Academics: An Invitation to Public Theology Read More »

More Discussion, Less Bored: Alternatives to Discussion Boards

For many classes, Discussion Boards serve as the primary means of assessing a student’s participation and preparation for class. Did they do the reading? Are they paying attention in class? Many faculty who teach online use discussion boards as a way to continue the conversations of the class outside of the classroom. This article is

More Discussion, Less Bored: Alternatives to Discussion Boards Read More »