Using Design Thinking in the Theological Classroom

What does a business concept have to do with teaching theology? Tom Kelly writes that a “Hands-on, user-centric approach to problem solving can lead to innovation, and innovation can lead to differentiation and competitive advantage.” As theological educators, our work is not inclined toward competitive advantage. Our work is to be present, embodied, and full Read More …

An Instructor’s Guide to Canvas Peer Review

Traditionally, peer review involves bringing papers to class, swapping, and finding time in class to read and review them. Now, we have Canvas LMS! A peer review assignment enables students to provide feedback on another student’s assignment submission. Peer reviews are a tool that allows communication between students and can help students master the concepts Read More …

6 Benefits to Peer Review in Theological Education

Simply put, peer review assignments enable students to provide feedback to each other. They are another tool to put in your pedagogical tool belt. There is a lot of research on peer review in the classroom. We will cover some best practices later in this article. The following Benefits to Peer Review we present here Read More …

Twitter for Academics: An Invitation to Public Theology

I recently spoke with a colleague who was curious about academic twitter (#AcademicTwitter). She mentioned how it has become a repository of resources. Everything from book launches to news articles – it’s so valuable. Our conversation shifted, however, once we began talking about Twitter best practices and how to use it.  For many academics, Twitter Read More …

More Discussion, Less Bored: Alternatives to Discussion Boards

For many classes, Discussion Boards serve as the primary means of assessing a student’s participation and preparation for class. Did they do the reading? Are they paying attention in class? Many faculty who teach online use discussion boards as a way to continue the conversations of the class outside of the classroom. This article is Read More …

4 Creative Uses for Polling in the Classroom

If the pandemic has shown us anything about education, it is that learning can often become a passive experience. This is true for both face-to-face and online instruction. Students will get into a “TV watching” mode and not actively engage in discussion. Now, this is not intentional and it is not something to assign blame. Read More …

Everyone Did the Reading: Collaborative Annotation in the Classroom

Often when students are assigned a reading, they gloss. They will see a name, a term, a concept… and skip it. Not because they aren’t engaged. Not because they don’t want to learn. But because it is one of seven articles to have read by the end of the week. Put simply, collaborative annotation is Read More …

Better Digital Whiteboards for Classroom Collaboration

In March of 2020, the world of higher education shifted from teaching classes on campus to Emergency Remote Teaching — How do we take exactly what we do in the classroom and teach effectively online? Online education has often been looked down upon because of the assumption that it does not generate the same interactive Read More …

Contemporary Cultural Item with Jesus and John Wayne

Associate Professor of American Religious History, Alison Greene, teaches a course called “History of Christianity in America.” In her course, she assigns a cultural analysis project through the lens of Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation by Kristen Kobes Du Mez. In this text, Du Mez provides Read More …

Practical Papers for Practical Theology

In her course, “Introduction to Practical Theology,” Susan Reynolds invites her students to explore what it means to “do theology in context.” She says, “As they negotiate the fluid, shifting boundary between theology and practice, they encounter a wide and interdisciplinary variety of texts.” In place of the weekly “one-pager” response or reflection of the Read More …