Author Archives: Oluwatosin Olojo

#WeAreEmoryEPI: Meet Andres Miller!

Category : #WeAreEmoryEPI

Meet Andres Miller! He is a second-year MPH Candidate in Global Epidemiology with various research interests nurtured through his experiences and time at Rollins! Andres shared with us some of his experiences.


Tell us about your academic history/where you went to school.

I attended Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee. While there, I majored in Biology and minored in Urban Community Health.

 

What are your primary research interests?

My research interests are varied but centered around understanding the social and neighborhood dynamics that drive inequitable health outcomes in historically marginalized communities. I am particularly interested in chronic disease surveillance and translating epidemiologic methods into action to directly impact people.

 

Are there any exciting projects that you are currently working on that you’d like to share with us?

I am working on a project highlighting methodologies and measurements used to approximate structural racism to benefit researchers exploring these topics. More recently, an old colleague has reached out to collaborate on building a small community assessment exploring adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and educational outcomes for children in South Memphis. Although it is still in the works, I am excited to apply some of the tools I’ve learned in study design through my coursework to benefit communities similar to those that shaped me!

 

What is your favorite part about earning your MPH at Emory?

The collaboration! Emory has an extensive reach, and I appreciate the willingness of faculty and staff to get students involved in research and practical opportunities.

 

When applying, what were you looking for in a public health school, and what factors drove you to pick Rollins?

The biggest thing that stuck out to me was the access to the extensive network of Emory/Rollins alumni doing amazing things in the field of public health. I have worked as a public health professional in work and through travelling, and I was always struck by the care and intention I saw in Rollins graduates. Also, as an alumnus of the National Service, it felt great going to a place that invests in and recognizes the diverse perspectives that come from engaging in deep, meaningful service to your community.

 

What has been your favorite class at Rollins thus far, and why?

I would have to say EPI 542 (Epidemiology of Tuberculosis), which is a 7-week class. It was an excellent opportunity to hear from leaders–who are actively working in the field–share their experiences addressing outbreaks and scientific advancements. Being able to walk through a real-life case study with the CDC Tuberculosis Response team and asking them questions about their career paths did a lot for me. It really helped me visualize what my future career paths might look like!

 

How have you been spending your free time?

Free time? What do you mean?

But seriously, I enjoy making music in my free time, and I have had the opportunity to be in community with fellow students on the weekends. I am also a nature nerd and am all about the outdoors. Sometimes, I’ll hit the trails around Atlanta and randomly identify birds.

 

Do you have any advice for anyone looking for prospective public health students?

Public health is for everyone! No matter what experiences you may have had in your professional and academic life, your voice, skills, perspectives, and passions can provide valuable insight into the field.

 

What advice do you have for 1st years?

Don’t be afraid to ask questions. I know we may have been conditioned for years to appear like we have all the answers, but science is all about knowing what you don’t know and being unafraid to admit it!

 

What are three fun facts that you want people to know about you?
  1. I am multilingual. I speak 3 to 4 languages.
  2. I once recorded a gospel album.
  3. After the World Series last year, [NBA legend and television personality] Charles Barkley once bought me a drink (along with the rest of the bar).

 

Thank you for talking with us, Andres! We can’t wait for everyone to see who we talk to next!


#InsideAPE: Joel Espinoza and the New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Category : #WeAreEmoryEPI

Meet Joel Espinoza! He is a second-year student on track to obtain a Master of Science in Public Health in Epidemiology. Joel is using his time at Rollins to obtain two certificates, one in Infectious Disease Epidemiology and the other in Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH). In addition, he shares his experience working in local government in New York City and his second APE with us.


Tell us about your academic history/where you went to school.

I graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 2021 with a Bachelor of Science in Molecular and Cell Biology and Public Health. 

 

What are your primary research interests?

I’m primarily interested in infectious disease surveillance, dynamics, and analysis, mainly sexually transmitted infections (STIs), enteric illnesses, and multi-drug resistant organisms.

 

Tell us about your APE project.

I have two! The first is a paid position with the New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH). I was initially recruited to assess the severity of Hepatitis C Virus-related outcomes (cirrhosis, liver transplantation, cancer, etc.) from 2001 to 2019 in New York City; however, my tasks have expanded to generating reports and handling data requests for clinics throughout the city. I also provide analytical support as it relates to the new Monkeypox outbreak.

My second APE is tied to my thesis, where I work with GOJO Industries, which is the maker of Purell. I am creating a database to assess the efficacy of alcohol-based sanitizers versus traditional handwashing in reducing the microbial load on hands among varying age groups and geographies.

 

How did you find your APE project?

I started with random internet searches around large cities because I knew I wanted local government experience. I had found the Epi Scholars program with the DOHMH on my own, and I started working on the application about a month before I noticed that Rollins had shared it in the newsletter.

 

When did you start looking for an APE? When did you start working for your APE organization?

I started looking for APEs around late October/November, but I didn’t officially start with DOHMH until June! To be fair, there was a very long application process for this program, and I hadn’t confirmed my position until about mid-April.

 

Are you pursuing/interested in any certificates? If so, was it difficult to meet your APE requirements?

Yes! Luckily, the Infectious Disease Epidemiology and WASH certificates complement each other well, despite “double-dipping” being prohibited. I had to do two APEs because the Epi Scholars Program/Project was/is not WASH-related. Since my thesis was, I worked with GOJO Industries and my thesis advisor to create another APE that would benefit both GOJO and my academic career.

 

What has the experience been like so far?

I’d say I really hit the ground running with my current position. Local governments, especially large ones like New York City, are constantly changing and restructuring. This coincidentally left the current bureau I work in with only one data analyst, so they’ve put me to work! I have had some opportunities to network, but many people still operate remotely due to the pandemic. Luckily, I have received an offer to take on a remote contract position as a Research Specialist to continue to assist the department as needed.

 

Any advice for people looking for an APE?

The most sage advice I received was from Dr. Scott Fridkin: He encouraged me not to pick an APE just because it was “available,” alluding to my current work with the Georgia Emerging Infections Program. He made me realize that the APE serves to expand on our skills and experiences that we haven’t yet had the opportunity to gain within our first year. It gave me the courage to stick it out through the waiting period to hear back instead of settling for another option.

 

How have you been spending your free time this summer? Anything interesting you’re doing?

I’ve been exploring New York City! My jobs allow me to work remotely at times, so I also try to turn that into opportunities to explore new coffee shops.

 

What are three fun facts you want people to know about you?
  1. I’ve been a dancer for over eight years.
  2. I can make balloon animals.
  3. My favorite flavor is anything s’more related . . . with maple as a close second.

 

Thanks for talking with us, Joel! Tune in next week to see who we speak to next!


#WeAreEmoryEPI: Meet Dannelle Charles!

Category : #WeAreEmoryEPI

Meet Dannelle Charles! She is a first-year MPH Candidate in the Epidemiology Department and is our second department representative on the Rollins Student Government Association. She’s interested in the health of Black and Indigenous/Latine health. Let’s hear more about her.


Tell us about your academic history/where you went to school.

I completed my undergraduate degree at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida, in 2022. While there, I obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and a minor in Public Health.

 

What are your primary research interests?

My primary research interests are maternal and child health. I want to focus on the Black infant and maternal mortality rate, maternal substance use, and Black & Indigenous/Latine reproductive health. I am also interested in focusing on health disparities and family needs assessment.

 

Are there any exciting projects that you are currently working on that you’d like to share with us?

Currently, I am working on a qualitative project focusing on identifying the barriers to adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) adherence among Black women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The primary focus is on Black women because of their low adherence rates to AET compared to white women. For this project, we interviewed both patients and providers.

 

What is your favorite part about earning your MPH at Emory?

My favorite part about earning my degree at Emory thus far is the connections I’ve made with my peers! I appreciate that everyone genuinely wants to help each other out and is rooting for one another. I have noticed that we all have a similar theme in the trajectory that brought us here at Emory; you’ll always feel seen and heard here.

 

When applying, what were you looking for in a public health school, and what factors drove you to pick Rollins?

At Rollins, I would be mentored by faculty in my niche research interest and be in the public health capital of the world. What really drove me to pick Rollins was the exchange of positive experiences from alums when reflecting on their time in the program, from the courses to faculty to peer-to-peer interactions.

 

What advice do you have for people who may be interested in getting their MPH?

Go for it! What’s amazing about this degree and public health is that it’s multidisciplinary, so you’ll still be able to utilize what you’ve learned in these two years, regardless of your chosen career, after earning your MPH.

 

What are three fun facts that you want people to know about you?
  1. I’m a first-generation graduate student.
  2. I’m a loud and proud Haitian-American.
  3. I have a three-octave range.

Thanks for talking with us, Dannelle! Tune in next week to see who we talk to next!


#WeAreEmoryEPI: Meet Brenda Hardy!

Category : #WeAreEmoryEPI

Luckily,we have our very own Associate Director of Academic Programs (ADAP) specifically for it. Our ADAPs are the equivalent of academic advisors at most institutions, and they serve as a great point of contact for questions relating to the department, academic advising, classes, and so much more. Take the opportunity to meet our ADAP, Brenda Hardy! She advises students who are in the Global Epidemiology (GLEPI) Master of Public Health and Master of Science in Public Health programs.


Tell us a little about your academic history/where you went to school.

I earned all three of my degrees from the University of Albany in New York. I hold a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology, a Masters of Science in Counseling Psychology and a Certificate of Advanced Study (CAS) degree in School Counseling.

 

What were you doing before you came to Rollins?

Right after I graduated, I was an archaeologist for a number of years. Then, when I had my son, I returned to school to earn my Master’s and CAS degrees. I have since been advising in higher education for about 33 years.

 

Why did you want to become ADAP for the Epidemiology Department?

I had been in higher education for quite a long time. I was moving to Georgia to be near my grandchildren, and the Department of Epidemiology was hiring. When I interviewed and learned more about the job, I knew the department would be a perfect fit for me.

 

What are you most excited about working with MPH students?

I love seeing them be so successful and so caring. Epidemiology and public health are such wonderful professions, and this is my way of supporting both the field and my students.

 

What goals do you have when working with new students?

I have a few goals. Most importantly, I want to make sure that my students are okay. I like listening to my students and helping them achieve their goals. I want my students to always feel cared for and understood.

 

What is your favorite part of being at Emory?

I love so many things. My favorite part of all of it is the people I work with. They make coming to work a joy. I also love doing all I can to help everything go smoothly for everyone on staff, as well as students.

 

What advice do you have for students?

Be kind. Be kind to others and be kind to yourself. Figure out what is important to you and work towards your goals. Also, know that goals can change and plans can change. Be open to the possibilities.

 

What is one place in Atlanta that you would recommend people to visit?

My son, daughter-in-law, grandkids and I will often go to IKEA and then the Georgia Aquarium. I am new to the area, and I don’t know a lot of policies. Doing things in Atlanta can be such a drive since I live in Cobb County.

 

What are you currently reading/watching/listening to?

I read the Matthew Perry biography in two days. I watch a lot of documentaries on TV.

 

What are three fun facts that you want people to know about you?
  1. I love being a grandma more than anything.
  2. I made my son’s and daughter-in-law’s wedding cake.
  3. I loved doing archaeology and working at the New York State Museum.

 

Thanks for talking with us, Brenda! We’re happy to have you in the Emory EPI family.


#WeAreEmoryEPI: Meet Frad Barry!

Category : #WeAreEmoryEPI

Farah sadly left the EPI department to join the Emory Global Health Institute; however, we happily welcomed a new Associate Director of Academic Programs (ADAP) just last month. Our ADAPs are the equivalent of academic advisors at most institutions, and they serve as a great point of contact for questions relating to the department, academic advising, classes, and so much more. Take the opportunity to meet our new ADAP, Frad Barry!


Tell us a little about your academic history/where you went to school.

I attended Mississippi State University (Hail STATE!). I obtained both my bachelor’s and master’s degrees from there. My Bachelor of Science degree is in Biological Sciences, and my master’s was in Health Promotion.

 

What were you doing before you came to Rollins?

I worked with Undergraduate Admissions for Emory, specifically Emory’s Oxford Campus. Before that, I also worked as a Residence Life Coordinator with the Oxford Campus.

 

Why did you want to become ADAP for the Epidemiology Department?

I wanted to become an ADAP because it allowed me to combine my work experiences with my educational background. I enjoy student development and being a part of their college journey. Student affairs work is so impactful, and sometimes it gets lost in college discussions.

 

What are you most excited about working with MPH students?

What excites me most is being able to help students! I get to develop these individual relationships and guide students in their academic journey.

 

What goals do you have when working with new students?

One goal that I have is to help students find their space within whatever community they want to be a part of, whether it be professionally or personally.

 

What is your favorite part of being at Emory?

My favorite part of being at Emory is the community, the network, and the supportive environment that Emory has. Relationship building is a key component of what I look for within my work environment, and Emory meets all of those needs.

 

What advice do you have for students?

I have two pieces of advice for students. The first is to be present and enjoy your life to its fullest. The second is to always advocate for your worth and passions.

 

What is one place in Atlanta that you would recommend people to visit?

There are a lot of fun things to do in Atlanta. High-Frequency Friday at the High Museum is a vibe! I’e recommend eating at The Nook, which is near Piedmont Park, and exploring Old Fourth Ward, too.

 

What are you currently reading/watching/listening to?

I’m currently watching a few shows, like HarlemHow to Get Away with Murder, and Top Chef. I’ve also been listening to a lot of Nick Hakim and Beyoncé’s Renaissance (on repeat). I’m always open to any podcast suggestions if anyone has any.


 

Thanks for talking with us, Frad! We’re happy to have you join the Emory EPI family.


#InsideAPE: Michaela Bonnett and the Emory Autism Center

Category : #WeAreEmoryEPI

Meet Michaela Bonnett! She is a second-year MPH Candidate in Global Epidemiology with a research interest in developmental disabilities and delays in lower- and middle-income countries and underserved populations. Michaela takes us inside her APE to share her experience working with the Emory Autism Center.


Tell us about your academic history/where you went to school.

I got my Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of Nebraska – Lincoln.

 

What are your primary research interests?

I am interested in developmental disabilities and delays, particularly autism. I especially want to focus on the detection and healthcare infrastructure associated with these concerns in low- and middle-income countries and underserved populations.

 

Tell us about your APE project.

I designed and conducted a brief study, which I submitted for IRB approval, focused on identifying sources of disparity in accessing and utilizing autism diagnostic and supportive services among children in Metro Atlanta. The study centered around a series of qualitative expert interviews with experienced daycare directors representing Atlanta’s diverse regions and population. My APE will culminate with a report of our findings that will be used as groundwork for more extensive future studies with the Emory Autism Center.

 

How did you find your APE project?

I conducted a series of informational interviews with Emory faculty, describing my research interests and goals. A very helpful professor put me in contact with the director of Emory Autism Center, and I worked together with him to design my APE from the ground up.

 

When did you start looking for an APE? When did you start working for your APE organization?

I started looking for my APE in December, at the end of my first semester. I started designing my APE with the Emory Autism Center in March of my second semester.

 

Are you pursuing/interested in any certificates? If so, was it difficult to meet your APE requirements?

I’m not pursuing a certificate; however, finding an APE that met my interests while meeting the global health requirement was challenging. I was lucky enough to discover that focusing on an underserved domestic population is also a way to meet the global health requirement that the EPI department has for GLEPI students.

 

What has the experience been like so far?

It has been great having hands-on research experience that has let me connect with the community. Still, I also get the unique experience of being a primary investigator on a study from start to finish. There have been frustrating moments, and I’ve had multiple setbacks, but I’ve also gained some really valuable mentors. Encompassing everything, the experience has been worth it!

 

Any advice for people looking for an APE?

It’s never too early to start looking but don’t panic if you don’t find something even after you’ve been looking for a while. Don’t be afraid to think outside the box if you want to do something really unique.

 

What are three fun facts you want people to know about you?
  1. I’ve lived on 3 continents, and I hope to get that number even higher.
  2. I love baking, especially desserts. I always make enough to share!
  3. I’m a Nebraskan, and I somehow miss the Midwest.

 

Thanks for sharing your APE experience with us, Michaela! Come back next week to see the next student who we feature!


#InsideAPE: Noah Mancuso and Coptic Hope Center for Infectious Diseases

Category : #WeAreEmoryEPI

Meet Noah Mancuso! Noah is a second-year student on track to obtain a Master of Science in Public Health in Global Epidemiology. His primary research interest is HIV treatment and prevention. For his APE, Noah is working with one of our faculty members in Kenya!


Tell us about your academic history/where you went to school.

I studied both Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Global Health at Duke University as part of the Robertson Scholars Leadership Program.

 

What are your primary research interests?

I’m interested in studying infectious diseases, specifically HIV treatment and prevention.

 

Tell us about your APE project.

I am working with Dr. Michael Chung and the Treatment, Research, and Expert Education (TREE) Program at the Coptic Hope Center for Infectious Diseases in Nairobi, Kenya. We are looking at cervical cancer recurrence among a large cohort of women living with HIV. My job is to help inventory biospecimens in the lab, to link them to patient electronic medical records, and to create an epi database for analysis.

 

How did you find your APE project?

Dr. Chung was a guest judge at the Global Health Case Competition I competed in, and his feedback/knowledge was super helpful. I then saw him listed as a faculty member attending the Epi Interactions event that the department hosted, and I decided to ask him more about his work.

 

When did you start looking for an APE? When did you start working for your APE organization?

I started looking for my APE over winter break and into the spring semester. I did not secure it until March. I started working on my APE in Atlanta in May, and I arrived in Kenya in June.

 

Are you pursuing/interested in any certificates? If so, was it difficult to meet your APE requirements?

I am doing the infectious disease epidemiology certificate, which is available for people across different departments to do. Since I am working with women living with HIV, it was not difficult to meet the certificate APE requirements.

 

What has the experience been like so far?

The experience has been great so far! The transition to Nairobi was very easy. My colleagues have been very welcoming of me and easy to work with, and there has been lots to explore and discover.

 

Any advice for people looking for an APE?

Don’t be afraid to ask your professors AND classmates if they know of any opportunities or faculty working in your field of interest. And don’t stress if everyone else around you appears to have their APE already figured out. 🙂

If you’re interested in working internationally, I’d also highly recommend looking into the Global Field Experience (GFE) Financial Award early on in your APE search, so that you can be prepared to apply for funding.

 

How have you been spending your free time this summer? Anything interesting that you’re doing?

So far, I have been able to do a lot of hiking and camping around Kenya, which has been super cool! I also connected with the Jump Rope Association of Kenya and have been jumping with local teams at their practices and community performances around Nairobi.

 

What are three fun facts you want people to know about you?
  1. I am a professional jump rope athlete.
  2. I love to cook for friends.
  3. My cat, Penelope, is cuter than yours.

 

Thanks for talking with us, Noah! Tune in next week to see who we speak to next!


Finding an APE or Summer Opportunity

Category : PROspective

Spring always meant new beginnings and transformations, with flowers blooming. However, it also meant that rain would sometimes come around and ruin my day. During my first year at Rollins with new classes, the ADAPs throwing around the new acronym APE more often, it made me so nervous, as I didn’t know where to start. This was especially true, given the fact that I was coming into public health without a Bachelor’s in Public Health or much experience doing what I thought made public health. I didn’t have a clear idea where to start, but I can always help others find their APE/Summer Opportunity. 

1. Get your resume or CV in order. 

You need to have it together. This is the way that you communicate what you’ve done, who you are, and the skills you have to others. Your resume gives you a place to consolidate all of that information. Every opportunity requires something different: some want your resume, others require you fill in an online form, and a small minority don’t even ask for it. Your resume is a snapshot of who you are. From personal experience, not every resume will look the same. When I’m applying to an opportunity that requires me to be well-rounded versus one that requires me to showcase my ability to work in a lab, my resume won’t look the same.   

Know the difference between what a resume and a CV are. Your resume will probably be no more than 1 to 2 pages. Your CV will sometimes be triple that. Both require concrete details, but they’ll be used for different purposes. Both are used to secure interviews, but a resume is used in most non-federal/government or academic positions, but a CV can be used for fellowships/grants, research positions, etc. 

Also, sometimes having a cover letter can help. Cover letters help convey why you’re a great candidate for a role, but they also help to give a personalized explanation to your new employers. Even if an application says, “cover letter optional”, it doesn’t hurt to introduce people to your attitude, motivations and values. Cover letters, CVs, and resumes can all be worked on with the Office of Career Development, filled with great people who want you to find something you want just as much as you do yourself.  

2. Reach out to professors. Let them know what you’re looking for. 

Honestly, we underutilize our professors a lot of the time. I and many of my friends have had opportunities that have been connected to our professors. Sometimes, it feels like they don’t have the time, but they want to all help teach the next generation of public health professionals. You wanted to come to RSPH to be taught by great professors who have connections to places both within Emory and outside of it. The worst that they can ever tell you is no. (They could also potentially help you craft an opportunity just for you.) But in my experience, the worst I’ve gotten are constructive nos.  

A ”constructive no” is what I like to call a subset of constructive criticism. It is when a professor tells you no not because they don’t have an opportunity for you, but because they know that they aren’t the right fit for you. Part of being in academia is connecting with other faculty and professionals. And the biggest service that they can do for you is not waste your time. You’d be more upset doing something that doesn’t fulfil you and waste your time than finishing your APE/Summer Opportunity. 

3. Go online! Google, 12twenty, the Confounder, LinkedIn and more can be so helpful. 

Simply searching the words “public health internship” can present you with tons of opportunities. Your network won’t always know all the opportunities that can help you. Sometimes, new programs can start that they hadn’t heard about. For example, you can be part of the inaugural cohort of a new summer fellowship that no one else has ever done. You can find an internship with a small consulting company that is willing to have you be part time during your second year. Why limit yourself to a small pool of opportunities when you can increase it? 

Going online allows you to filter out opportunities that aren’t what you need or that you can’t do. If you hear about something in California from a professor but you’re aiming to stay in Atlanta for the summer, it can be disheartening. However, you can take key words from that opportunity and use it to find something else that does fill your needs. 

 4. Not everything is for everyone. Being patient is key. 

There’s nothing wrong with saying no. Part of being an adult is to say no to things, doing it in a professional way that doesn’t end a relationship. You may say no because you had a lot of responses, and you could only do one. You may say no because you won’t get the opportunity that you want from something. 

 I have said no to opportunities that I realized weren’t for me. I have said no to things that I thought wouldn’t provide me with an opportunity to learn what I wanted to in public health. We have such limited time in school that we need to make the most of every chance that we get. Potentially wasting it on something that you may dislike the entire time isn’t worth it. 

You don’t want to just fulfill your APE requirement. You’re in public health to make a difference, and you want to ensure that your graduate education allows you to do something meaningful. To do that, you need to think about why am I in public health? What do I want to do in my career in public health? 

You also need to be patient. Some opportunities won’t come in that window that you want. Others will come in a whirlwind of two days. Some won’t happen over the summer, like you wanted. You may get an opportunity that can only happen during the school year. Making sure that your APE fulfills that “why” and “what” for you is going to make that time so much more valuable. It’ll also be a great thing to talk about after your time at Rollins. 


#WeAreEmoryEPI: Meet Franchesca Amor Aguilar!

Category : #WeAreEmoryEPI

Meet Franchesca Amor Aguilar! She is a first-year MPH Candidate in Epidemiology and one of the department representatives for the Rollins Student Government Association. Let’s meet her!


Tell us about your academic history/where you went to school.

I received my Bachelor of Science in Biology from Gettysburg College in May 2022. While there, I also got a minor in East Asian Studies on the Chinese track.

 

What are your primary research interests?

My primary research interests are infectious disease epidemiology, vaccine epidemiology, outbreak response, and health inequities. However, I am still discovering new research interests!

 

Are there any exciting projects that you are currently working on that you’d like to share with us?

I’m currently working with the RECOVER Project under the Emory Health Services Research Center, an NIH-funded project focusing on understanding long COVID. I currently help organize and clean the data collected through REDCap from the five healthcare sites working with the Atlanta hub. (This project has several different hubs throughout the country!) In February, I will be working on a study with the CDC focusing on strategies to prevent respiratory illnesses among people who experience homelessness.

 

What is your favorite part about earning your MPH at Emory?

I love how supportive everyone at Rollins is! I never feel like I have to “compete” with my classmates because we’re all willing to share information and knowledge. It really resembles the collaborative nature of the public health field!

 

When applying, what were you looking for in a public health school, and what factors drove you to pick Rollins?

I picked Rollins because of the friendly atmosphere here. I didn’t think a graduate school campus could feel so welcoming. I also loved the connections that RSPH has with other public health organizations because I knew that meant I could gain different work experience.

 

How have you been spending your free time?

Lately, I’ve been listening to audiobooks and learning Spanish. I’m currently listening to Anxious People by Fredrik Backman. (I just recently discovered it is also a Netflix series!)

 

What advice do you have for people who may be interested in getting their MPH?

If you’re even remotely interested in getting your MPH, just do it because you can learn so much about a little bit of everything! Ask questions, attend faculty/student panels, and visit the campus!

 

What are three fun facts that you want people to know about you?
  1. I was the best female player at my undergrad’s e-sports competition in a Super Smash Bros tournament and finished top 10 overall!
  2. I was born and raised in Hawai’i, so I know a little Hawaiian and can speak Hawaiian Pidgin!
  3. I love to sing! I performed twice at my undergrad’s cultural talent show, once in English and once in Tagalog.

Thanks for talking with us, Franchesca! We loved getting to talk to you, and stay tuned to see who we’ll speak to next!


#WeAreEmoryEPI: Meet Cameron Goetgeluck!

Category : #WeAreEmoryEPI

Meet Cameron Goetgeluck! Cameron is a first-year MPH Candidate in Environmental Health & Epidemiology! Let’s see why he decided to come to Rollins!


Tell us about your academic history/where you went to school.

I attended the University of South Florida, majoring in Cell & Molecular Biology and minoring in Emergency Management.

 

What are your primary research interests?

I am interested in the environment’s role in disease transmission, and I would like to use that intersection to aid in outbreak investigations and study how disease strains evolve over time using epi-phylogenetics to inform control measures. I am also interested in emerging infectious diseases and exploring how exposure to toxicants can facilitate disease manifestation.

 

Are there any exciting projects that you are currently working on that you’d like to share with us?

I am working with an Environmental Health professor–Dr. Mike Caudle–on how toxicants can impact nerve development. I am also working on a project focused on defining risk perception and the disparate impacts that hurricanes in South Florida can have.

 

What is your favorite part about earning your MPH at Emory?

My favorite part about being at Rollins is being able to engage with world-class faculty that offer countless opportunities for students to participate and learn from. I also get to be part of a diverse cohort!

 

What are three fun facts that you want people to know about you?
  1. I have a twin.
  2. I’ve both cliff jumped and hang glided before.
  3. Thanks to TicketMaster, I waited in lines for hours to get tickets to a Taylor Swift concert.

Thanks for talking with us, Cameron! Tune in next week to see who we talk to next!


Upcoming Events

  • Humphrey Fellows Noontime Seminar Series April 25, 2024 at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Networking and Guest Lecture and Meeting and Special Event and Student Event; zoom.us… Online Location: https://zoom.us/j/95325531576Event Type: Networking,Guest Lecture,Meeting,Special Event,Student EventSeries: Noontime SeminarSpeaker: Various Speakers - see details by dateContact Name: Kris ValerianoContact Email: kvaleri@emory.eduRoom Location: RRR_R809Link: https://sph.emory.edu/departments/gh/fellows/humphrey-fellows/index.htmlFellows will present on a topic pertaining to their home country, culture and/or their work in public health.Deb Mcfarland Room, 8th floor RRR.3.28: Abeselom Gutta, MD &Yeshoda Aryal, MPH4.11: Ola Ziara,…
  • Tips from the Other Side of the Peer-Review Process to Help Get Your Scientific Manuscript Published April 25, 2024 at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Guest Lecture Event Type: Guest LectureSeries: Center for Faculty Development and ExcellenceSpeaker: Bruce G. Weniger, Adj Assoc Prof, RSPHContact Name: Carol ColaninnoContact Email: ccolani@emory.eduLink: https://forms.gle/uhaExcRPKar39LuC7Examples good and bad, templates, andanecdotes from journal-editor experience tolimit the burden and skepticism of busyreviewers who use conscious criteria andsubjective, often unconscious intuition to judgepublication worthiness using only yourmanuscript and revision cover…
  • 2024 Charles C. Shepard Award Symposium May 8, 2024 at 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm zoom.us… Online Location: https://zoom.us/j/96537866614The Charles C. Shepard Award is given to thegraduating masters student who is deemed bythe faculty to have prepared the most scholarlyresearch paper. Please join us to recognize andcelebrate this year’s finalists who will present aposter of their work.

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