Exhibitions

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Born Digital: From Kilobytes to Terabytes Virtual Exhibit Walkthrough: The Future/Where We’re Going: (Case 3)

Hello, and welcome to week 3 of our Virtual Exhibit Walkthrough! Due to COVID-19 and Rose Library being closed, we’ve decided to do a virtual walk-through of our current exhibit, Born Digital: From Kilobytes to Terabytes.   For a more in-depth “tour,” see below for up-close photographs and exhibit text. Be sure to click through photographs of each case to view the entire…

Born Digital: From Kilobytes to Terabytes Virtual Exhibit Walk-through: Storage(Case 2)

Hello, and welcome to week 2 of our Virtual Exhibit Walkthrough! Due to COVID-19 and Rose Library being closed, we’ve decided to do a virtual walk-through of our current exhibit, Born Digital: From Kilobytes to Terabytes.   For a more in-depth “tour,” see below for up–close photographs and exhibit text. Be sure to click through photographs of each case to view the entire…

Born Digital: From Kilobytes to Terabytes Virtual Exhibit Walk-through: Where Did We Begin? (Case 1)

Hello, and welcome! Due to COVID-19 and Rose Library being closed, we’ve decided to do a  weekly virtual walk-through of our current exhibit, Born Digital: From Kilobytes to Terabytes.  For a more in-depth “tour,” see below for up–close photographs and exhibit text. Be sure to click through photographs of each case to view the entire thing!   Every text sent, every document…

The Making of an Exhibit: “Born Digital: From Kilobytes to Terabytes”  

“Born Digital: From Kilobytes to Terabytes,”  curated by Rose Library’s project digital archivist Brenna Edwards, explores and examines the collecting story of born-digital materials at Rose Library alongside the evolution of the technology creating these materials, featuring items from the papers of Lucille Clifton, Jake Adam York, Salman Rushdie, and Elaine Brown.  The Beginning:   In…

Join us on January 31 for Emory’s Evening with Educators!

This free event, open to Atlanta area K-12 educators and administrators, begins at the Carlos Museum and ends at the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Books Library as we co-host our Evening for Educators. Participants can explore both locations and learn more about the exhibitions “DO or DIE: Affect, Ritual, Resistance” by Dr….

Words are Power: Remembering the Storyteller Julius Lester

Among the thousands of authors found in the Stuart A. Rose Library, Julius Lester (1939-2018) is a giant. An essayist, writer, folklorist, civil rights activist, and teacher, Lester’s work has been an integral part of helping African Americans maintain the oral tradition of storytelling.  Through his creative explorations into the past, we are more aware…

Talking back: bringing Beat counterculture into the modern era through dance

Author William S. Burroughs said, “In the U.S. you have to be a deviant or die of boredom.” Burroughs was certainly the former. He was a lifelong heroin addict, who wrote explicitly and affectionately of his drug use. He was openly queer at a time in American history when you could be arrested simply for…

Celebrate the Service of African Americans in WWI

Opening soon at the Rose Library,  “A Question of Manhood: African Americans and WWI” commemorates the centennial of the First World War, while celebrating the African American men who served as citizen-soldiers at a time when they were systematically denied full access to the promises democracy. The exhibit explores the challenges and conflicts, as well…

Living With Exhibition Offers Opportunity to Share AIDS History

Georgia Equality will honor World AIDS Day this year with a provocative community art exhibit at West Midtown’s Gallery 874 on November 30–December 1, 2016. The exhibit, Living With, explores the life stories of five HIV positive young people in Georgia through a series of multi-media installations created by local artists working alongside the youth…

The Billops-Hatch Butterfly Project

“When I leave our loft, it will be feet first, or in a butterfly net.” – Jim Hatch, April 18, 2004 In the 1970s, Camille Billops and James V. Hatch started inviting friends and students into their New York City loft to record public conversations with visual artists, writers, poets, actors, and musicians. During this…