Summer Reading, vol. 1: Brent Strawn

Congratulations to the Emory and Candler communities on a stellar year— and particular congratulations to students in the Class of 2017! Whether you are headed to a new job, new school, or a well-deserved vacation, Pitts has polled faculty and staff to find the perfect books to keep you company.

For our first entry, we spoke to Dr. Brent Strawn, Professor of Old Testament and Director of the Doctor of Ministry program at Candler. First on Dr. Strawn’s list is Helmut Thielicke’s A Little Exercise for Young Theologians, which provides wide-reaching and insightful advice for seminarians, including those new to the field. In addition to this short and sweet volume, Dr. Strawn also suggests the C.S Lewis classic The Great Divorce. Dr. Strawn tries to reread both of these works every year despite his busy schedule.

As a final suggestion, Dr. Strawn recommends Henri Nouwen’s In the Name of Jesus: Reflections on Christian Leadership. Nouwen wrote this slim volume during his tenure as a priest at Daybreak, a L’Arche community. In his own words, Nouwen hoped to explain, “how I live from day to day after having spoken for twenty years to young men and women preparing themselves for ministry” (Prologue). We absolutely agree with Dr. Strawn’s recommendation of this “inspiring” book! Nouwen’s thoughts on bridging the gap between the academic study of theology and the lived experience of ministry have particular significance to all of us who are a part of the Candler community.

Last, but not least, since Dr. Strawn was too modest to add any of his own publications to this list, we will go ahead and brag for him! Dr. Strawn’s newest book, “The Old Testament is Dying: A Diagnosis and Recommended Treatment” came out earlier this year. We would highly recommend this timely monograph, which urges contemporary Christians to study the Old Testament (and study it well), mining this rich resource for new life in the church!

Many thanks to Dr. Strawn for his wonderful suggestions– stay tuned for more faculty and staff summer reading ideas in the upcoming months!

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Congratulations Grads, Now Alums!

Pitts would like to congratulate all the new Emory graduates! As new alums of Emory, you still have access to Pitts, and we hope you will continue to use the library. Visit http://pitts.emory.edu/alums to learn about how you can still borrow books, access alumni databases, and work with our reference librarians.

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Pitts Summer Hours

Starting on Wednesday, May 3rd, the Pitts Theology Library will shift to its summer hours. The Library will be open Monday through Friday, 7:30am to 5:00pm, and closed on all weekends. For a full listing of library hours, including holidays and exceptions, visit http://pitts.emory.edu/hours. Enjoy your summer!

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Finals at the Pitts Theology Library

As Candler and Emory enter the Reading Period (4/24-4/27) and Final Exams (4/28-5/3), we wish students the best with their work. During this time, Pitts will be open extended hours (http://pitts.emory.edu/hours), and we encourage all patrons to make the library a quiet, clean, and hospitable place to work (http://pitts.emory.edu/policies). If you have any questions, or if our librarians can help with those final projects, please let us know! Good luck!

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Finals on the Horizon!

From Monday 4/24 through Tuesday 5/2, Pitts Theology Library will extend its hours. Opening hours will stay the same, but the Library will stay open additional hours at night. For full hours, please visit http://pitts.emory.edu/hoursPlease Note that the building locks soon after the library closes, so all students will need to leave the Candler School of Theology building complex when the library closes. There are other 24-hour study spaces on campus, particularly the Woodruff Library (http://web.library.emory.edu/using-the-library/visiting-the-library/hours/).

During this time, we will also be a silent study space, so please take any conversations outside of the library. Additionally, the third floor classrooms will be open to accommodate extra study space, so be sure to check there for a quiet study spot! If you’re in need of collaborative study space, you can book a group study room at http://pitts.emory.edu/rooms.

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Pitts Closed for Easter

The Pitts Theology Library will be closed from Friday, April 14th, through Sunday, April 16th, in observance of Good Friday and Easter Sunday. The Library will re-open at 7:30am on Monday, April 17th. For all Library hours, visit http://pitts.emory.edu/hours.

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Easter Image Resources

As Holy Week approaches, the to-do lists get longer and the time gets shorter! Even though it isn’t, strictly speaking, the “good news” of this liturgical season, Pitts does have some good news! You can cross at least one item off your list by finding bulletin and program images in the Pitts Digital Image Archive. In addition to the regular character search features, you can also search the database by scripture verse, streamlining the search process.
You can find almost 600 images that engage the crucifixion in the DIA database, including this representation of Jesus as the “Man of Sorrows” in the title page to one of Martin Luther’s sermons on the suffering of Christ. Try searching for the term “crucifixion” or “cross” or even “suffering” and “Christ.” Each DIA entry will include a brief description of the image as well as information about the original source of the image, which we hope can help you and your parishoners engage the biblical texts in new ways.

In keeping with the cyclical nature of the Holy Week events, there are also a number of images relating to the joy of the resurrection! One particularly beautiful find is this stunning 15th century woodcut pulling from the Mark 16 version of the Easter story (the lion at Christ’s feet is the iconographic representation of the evangelist Mark).

You can also find images that highlight the women present at the crucifixion and the resurrection events, such as the 16th c. woodcut to the right. Bottom line: the DIA is a rich resource that we hope will enhance you Holy Week programs (and many other aspects of your church’s print material as well)!

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McDonald Conference: Commemorating the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation

The fourth in the McDonald Distinguished Scholar Lectures series commemorates the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation with a two-day international conference on April 3 and 4 at Cannon Chapel. The conference is convened by the Center for the Study of Law and Religion and Candler School of Theology and sponsored by the McDonald Agape Foundation.

This event is free and open to the public. For the full schedule, go here. Complimentary boxed lunches for conference attendees will be served both days. To register, go here.

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Pitts-Sponsored Film Night Thursday 3/30

We hope you will join us for a screening of the film Munich ’72 & Beyond: A Film of Redemption, a Monument of Remembrance. This film screening, sponsored by the Pitts Theology Library, the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies, and Emory Film and Media Studies, will be held on Thursday, March 30, at 7pm in White Hall Room 208. The 45-minute film will be followed by a question and answer session with the film’s producer, Dr. Steven Ungerleider. You can register for the event here, and you can learn more about the film at http://munichmemorial.org.

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Book Sale

Join us for the annual Friends of the Library Book Sale in the third floor lecture hall and atrium at Pitts Theology Library on Tuesday, March 21 and Wednesday, March 22 from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm. Thousands of books will be on sale for $1 – 5, with a few special items for $10. Cash only.

There are nearly 6,000 books in this year’s sale and a range of categories including theology, biblical studies, ethics, literature, philosophy, ministry, and more. We look forward to seeing you there!

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